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Author Topic: Galaxian Mame Conversion  (Read 50667 times)

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lcddream

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Control Panel Artwork
« Reply #120 on: February 17, 2008, 12:13:08 pm »
I'm surprised to see how nasty some people around here can get.

To the OP good luck, it looks like you are doing a great job!

csa3d

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Control Panel Artwork
« Reply #121 on: February 17, 2008, 08:00:59 pm »
Well, here it is.  I applied the artwork last weekend.  The artwork MameMarquees provided came on giant rolls of sticky sided vinyl, much like a giant sticker.  Though I provided Scott with exact measurements of the cab (which were a tad smaller then his standard "full size"), he still sent me full sized artwork.  Ok, I didn't think much of it because in the end, it ended up working out, and not much difference was noticed when trimming it off.

My sides and front of the cabinet were primed with white paint only, to prevent mold and aged must from re-emerging.  I windexed these areas well and dried them completely before applying the stickers.  they went on well, without a problem, although it took two people to maneuver it just right.  They stuck on fine, no bubbles, trimmed up well, and I was pretty pleased.  This process took about 2 hours I'd guestimate.

Well, a day later, the front the right side and front of cabinet began to peal away.  No matter how many times i try to stick it back down, it keeps coming back off.  It would appear to me, that the sticky vinyl material was not meant to go onto primed wood.  I'm currently kinda bummed.  That artwork set me back 260$.  I will be making a trip to the hardware store to find some sort of glue to remedy this problem.  As it stands, I'm not sure I'd want spray adhesive, because I don't want to overspray onto the artwork or finished interior paint.  I'm thinking I need some sort of laminate glue like used on countertops, and spread it on thinly, doing half of the artwork at a time and letting it set, so that it still lines up properly.

Worse case senario is that I'll have to re-order this artwork and do that part over again.  This is a busy week or two with family coming into town and work deadlines, so until this issues has resolved itself, there will be no pictoral updates to stir any "I told you so" pots. ;)

-csa
« Last Edit: February 18, 2008, 08:30:06 am by csa3d »

Sir Auros

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Control Panel Artwork
« Reply #122 on: February 17, 2008, 08:41:20 pm »
OUCH!

I can't imagine what I'd do if I spent that kind of money on something that got fubared. I hope you can find some glue that'll do the trick.

koolmoecraig

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Control Panel Artwork
« Reply #123 on: February 19, 2008, 06:11:06 am »
Your control panel design is a great way to MAME a classic but I don't agree with LCD and ditching the vertical layout.  But, whatever.

Here are my panels keeping in the theme of the cabinets:




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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Control Panel Artwork
« Reply #124 on: March 12, 2008, 08:53:31 am »
Awesome CP for the space you have, I am currently considering adding a trackball to my CP which is just 6" by 26".

Could I ask some questions...

I noticed you ditched the idea of 2p buttons in the end, was this after working on a test CP?

What are the vertical dimensions of your CP?

Have you had any problems with the 'thinness' of the MDF on the trackball mount?

How did you so carefully route out the round corners of the trackball case - is there a trick? My router seems to have a 'route' of its own!

And most importantly, playing games like Marble madness or Golden tee have you had any problems with proximity of controls?

Sorry to ask so many questions!!

Ex
My kitchen cab is progressing here

csa3d

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Control Panel Artwork
« Reply #125 on: March 12, 2008, 09:43:44 am »
I noticed you ditched the idea of 2p buttons in the end, was this after working on a test CP?

If you take a look at the underside of my control panel, the right side of that picture is where player 2 buttons were originally slated to go.  The PCB on the right is from the TurboTwist spinner, and that cord was only so long.  I thought about mounting it to the front of my control panel (top of picture), but because my control panel hinges upwards from the top, I figure there's a chance someone could grab it accidentally while doing this, or that it may get caught on something.  The included wires weren't long enough to relocate it to the other side, but I suppose you could if you *really* wanted to.  So yeah, you could probably squeeze those buttons in.

The way I started my layout, was with the two joysticks.  My cab has high sides, so if you mount them too wide, your wrists are going to hit the edges, which would make playing terrible.  I mounted them as wide as I felt I could.  Then based on a button dimensions thread, the spacing for the 6 button layout determined how much space I had for the trackball and player 2 side.  Next was the trackball and spinner.  The trackball ate up a lot more space underneath then I anticipated, and when it was all said and done, adding those two extra buttons on the player 2 side seemed silly.  P2's hands would be so close together that I figured why bother.  Plus with the high sides, and 23.75" of elbow room, I decided this was going to be a 1 player only cab.  That won't be an issue in my current household.  If you went with 4 buttons in a diamond shape vs. 6 player street fighter layout, then you would probably have greater success.  Your other option would be to nix the trackball (which was not an option in my mind).

What are the vertical dimensions of your CP?
I'm pretty sure it was about 6 inches.  I can measure tonight when I'm home.  I built the current CP based on the romstar one which came with the cab.

Have you had any problems with the 'thinness' of the MDF on the trackball mount?
All this time, and I have ironically, not even fired my machine up!  I'm currently working on a rotating monitor solution, and don't want to loose site of the prize.

How did you so carefully route out the round corners of the trackball case - is there a trick? My router seems to have a 'route' of its own!
I suppose I held on tight and tried to keep a steady line.  I had traced the trackball onto the wood before starting, and the rounded edges were created from the diameter of the router bit.  If you search the forums, others have discussed methods of making templates.  I figured, that wasn't important, I'm only doing this once, and if I goofed up it would be under the panel where most no one will ever look.


And most importantly, playing games like Marble madness or Golden tee have you had any problems with proximity of controls?
I'll have to let you know in another couple months at the rate I'm going on my build.. (stupid real life..)  :badmood:

Sorry to ask so many questions!!
Yeah.. you have exceeded your quota  :laugh2:  Feel free to ask whatever else, always glad to help

-csa

csa3d

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Rotating Monitor work continues...
« Reply #126 on: March 12, 2008, 09:51:33 am »
Since last we left off (to update the progress further), I've affixed the peeling vinyl back onto the machine using contact cement.  It's not coming back off now!  Doing it over, I'd probably have used spray adhesive, as the contact cement dried super fast, and made the surface underneath show imperfections as the glue balled up and dried.  Bubbles happened as well, and I've got most of them out using the push technique and pinning the others.  I'm fairly certain that if I undertake another cab, I will probably go with laminate or do a woody style cab.  Full sized vinyl artwork is no joke.  At any rate, while I was mildly disappointed with with end result, it still looks 100 times better then when I pulled it from it's grave months back.

Work continues on the rotating monitor, with help from TeamRotate :)
« Last Edit: March 12, 2008, 09:53:35 am by csa3d »

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Control Panel Artwork
« Reply #127 on: March 12, 2008, 11:43:49 am »
Thanks for all your answers.

I think you got the happs 2.25" TB? What are the dimensions of the case, or area you routed out? That will help me determine whether I have space.

If you a have dimensions diagram for joys/buttons etc on for reasons of proximity I would be interested.
My kitchen cab is progressing here

csa3d

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Control Panel Artwork
« Reply #128 on: March 12, 2008, 01:22:56 pm »
I think you got the happs 2.25" TB? What are the dimensions of the case, or area you routed out? That will help me determine whether I have space.

I got the 2.25" from GroovyGameGear.com, and I think it's ultimately a modified betson imperial.  I think Randy has trackball mounting pdf's somewhere on his site.. I know mine came shipped with something like that.

If you a have dimensions diagram for joys/buttons etc on for reasons of proximity I would be interested.

The Control Panel Hole Sizes thread is the best I can give you for these.  Check the manufacturer's sites for other dimensions perhaps.  I'm convinced that at some point in time, you cannot exactly plan for everything, and it becomes a matter of trial and error.. unless of cource, you completely model out all parts in Sketup.. which may or may not be under progress still.

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Control Panel Artwork
« Reply #129 on: March 12, 2008, 02:11:33 pm »
Thought it was from GGG, the electric ice-t i think, I found the pdf for the 3" but was unsure if the 2.25" had the same case size. If you could measure one side (as if it were a square) then I can confirm. There is only one pdf on Randy's site.

Re hole sizes, I am ok with the sizes, already have an existing panel, but guess was more interested on how close you had put your admin buttons next to the p1/p2 joys and how close you put the spinner to the trackball.

I assume that when you (part) finished the CP you had a little pretend play ;) to see whether you thought it 'worked' or not, hence I am considering using those measurements as the min I can go - if you see what I mean.

BTW, my cp design is progressing here.
My kitchen cab is progressing here

csa3d

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Rotating LCD Mount
« Reply #130 on: March 23, 2008, 02:51:15 am »
Rotating Monitor Mount

This weekend has been big, as the rotating monitor mount has come to fruition!  Special thanks to all who helped me get to this point.  Be sure to check out the following links to understand how I got to this point:

Psychotech's Axle Design
My fight with a Lazy Susan bearing
Creator of the Mala rotating plugin, and master rotator himself

And now here we go!

Parts

        You'll need the Pizza Pan and VESA mounting holes from this thread first!

       
       

        2x        Bones Red skateboard bearings (from your local skate shop, get the highest rated ones you can afford, they come in 8 packs btw)
        1x        2", 5/16" threaded bolt (Lowes.com, come in 2 packs)
        2x        5/16" nuts with locks built into them (Lowes, come in 2 packs, I suppose you could get separate lock washers..)
        1x        5/16" wing nuts (Lowes, came in 2 packs..)
        2x        m4 - .70 16mm screws (for vesa mount only, Lowes)
        2x        m4 - .70 20mm screws (for vesa mount and stoppers, Lowes)
        4x        1/4" nylon spacers, must fit over m4 screws (Lowes)
        4x        small L-Brackets (Lowes)
        8x        small felt chair pads (Lowes)
        2x        skinny, long (2-3") bolts + lock washers + nuts. (for limits, Lowes)
        a few   1 1/2" wood screws (Lowes)
        many   1/2" wood screws (Lowes)
        1x        standard short, Ethernet cable (I had tons of these, they come with everything apparently)
        2x        coin return switches (Divemaster here on BYOAC forums)
        6x        Crimp Connectors to fit coin switches (Lowes)
        1x        Ethernet femal to Printer Port male connector (Online link from here on another thread I can't remember offhand)
        many   1/4" nylon wire fasteners (Frys)
        1x        BYOAC Team Rotate motor kit
        1x        12 Port Terminal Block (Radioshack)
        2x        Wide L-Brackets for support bar (Lowes)
        1x        1x3x4" Piece of real wood (I used Aspen, MDF holds screws for %$&!)
        1x        pack of sandpaper
        1x        wood glue


Tools

        Drill
        various drill bits (1/2", 1/8", and a few others)
        Wire cutters
        Plyers
        Adjustable Wrench
        Screwdrivers
        Utility Knife
        Wire Crimpers
        Dremmel tool + sanding disks
        Soldering Kit
        7/8" Fostner Bit

Process

        1.  Take your 1x3x4, cut it to cab width.  Mark the center point.  I drew an "x" from corner to corner, and also marked half way point, to be doubly sure.
       
       

        2.  Drill a small pilot hole down through the center of your X.  If you have a drill press, now is the time to use it!  This hole will determine the axle's position on both sides of the brace.
       

        3.  Take a 7/8" Fostner bit, and using your pilot hole, drill down just far enough to allow the skate bearing to lay flush with the top of the wood.  Since I don't have a drill press, I stopped every so often, and tested it's level, making adjustments as I went further down.  The result should be the bearing laying flush with the top of the wood.  It will be a tad loose, but a 3/4" Fostner bit was too tight.  Maybe a drill press would have made it more snug.  You could always paint the inside.. anyways..
       

        Repeat this step for the reverse side.

        4.  Now you need to drill out a hole to go the whole way through the holes we just drilled, so the axle can slide through.  If you look at the bearing, there's an inside metal ring.  You do not want this ring touching the wood.  Therefore, I used a 1/2" drill bit to remove a doughnut from the center.  If I had a drill press, it would have been better centered.  As long as this hole is bigger then the interior metal ring of the bearing, you are good.  This allows that ring to rotate freely which is what we want.  The machined bearing is what the axle passes though, and that is exact.. meaning we don't necessarily have to be.
       
       

        Now is a good time to clean up this hole with some sandpaper.  Be sure to get it as dust free as possible before inserting your bearing.  Don't worry, you've got 6 more if you goof!

        You are now done with the axle's female mount!

        5.  Now we focus back on the Pizza Pan which we have drilled for our VESA Mount.  It needs the male acceptor.  Mark the center of your pan, if you have not all ready done so.  Love that machined precision of the airflow holes!
       

        7.  Insert the bolt so that the bolt sticks out the bottom of the pizza pan.  Lock it down tight with your locknut.
       

        8.  While we're drilling holes, you'll want to add bolts to catch the limit swich arms.  Locate 1 quadrant of your pizza pan (on a clock, 12 to 3).  You want to drill out 2 holes just large enough to accept your long, skinny bolts.  From the top resting foot, choose the hole 1 to the top right, then down one.  From the right resting foot, choose the hole 1 up, then 1 towards the center.  The below image is of the 3 o'clock hole, only the image is rotate 90 degrees counter clockwise.. (sorry, for crappy pic, I drilled out like 6 holes till I got this right)
       

       Your final product should be this:
       

       Congrats!  You've made the Male Axle Acceptor!

        9.  Now let's mount the plate onto the montor.  Grab 4 spacers, place them over the VESA holes.  Place the plate upside down over the spacers, so the plate's feet are facing you.  Take your 2 small (16mm) vesa screws and mount them at 10 o'clock and 4 o'clock in the VESA holes you made previously.  Now grab 4 of those small L-Brackets, and place 2 of them 90 degrees to one another as to make a right angle stopper.  Cover the vertical mount with felt, which will bump against the wood as it swings around.  Use the longer (20mm) VESA screws to secure them to the plate, while also attaching the plate to the monitor.  Now you can also mount the wood female brace to the plate, the order goes like such:

        Monitor -> spacers -> Pizza Plate -> 2" Bolt -> Locknut -> Bearing (red side down) -> wood cross brace -> Bearing (red side up) -> locknut (lock side up, not towards bearing) -> Wingnut


        See image below for further clarification.
       
       

        10.  Did you notice there's switches attached all ready??  That's cuz I'm a bad photo journalist!  You'll want to mount these now, unlike the pics.  One of them mounts right side up, the other upside down.  You'll need spacers for the upside down one, or else the trigger arm will catch on the wood.  I used some green brick hanger insert (screw into bricks), and cut them to length.  You could use a bic pen, or go buy some.  I made this up on the fly, as did most of the rest of this process from here on.  How far did I mount them from the center hole?  Far enough so I heard the arm trigger the click JUST before hitting the felt.  I figure that's enough room to bend the trigger arm to adjust for play.
       
       
       

       Note:  I had to bore the switch mounting holes a bit larger to accept wood screws.

        11.  Now you need to mount the hobby wheel, so it rests on the pizza pan, and will eventually spin the whole setup via software.  Do do so, I cut 2 small sections from the remaining Aspen 1x3x4, to make an angled piece to stick out from the cross brace, which holds the motor.  This was something I eyeballed up, making sure the wheel was parallel to one of the side feet of the pizza pan.  When buying the parts from Solobarics, I bought the stupid motor mounting bracket.. which one would think is a good idea.  Unfortunately, it's designed to be mounted on the same side as the wheel we want to use, which prevents the wheel from being able to be mounted.  Not to fear, flip that bracket over to the other side of the motor, bore out to top corner pass through hole a bit deeper, and bolt it together tightly.  You'll have to bore the metal bracket hole deeper to match also.  Another on the fly adjustment, done out of sheer willpower to use this stupid part that I bought that didn't work out of the box.  Fasten the driver mount securely to your cross brace with 1 1/2" wood screws and glue.  You're completed setup should resemble something like such:

       
       
       

        12.  Now all that's left is to follow the wiring guide that weisshaupt documented in his Mala Plugin for Parallel Port Control  This will take you quite a bit of time and frustration.  Mine is wired up using the Advanced 2, Pulse Modulation Control instructions.  It has not been tested just yet, but I've wired it to be separated into three sections:  a.) Driver Board  b.) Limit Switches  c.) Parallel Port  If something fails, I should be able to easily replace any one part of the setup without having to undo the whole she-bang.  Here's where I'm leaving you for today:

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       

That's where I'm at so far with this.  Should be able to test this out very soon, I only need to hook up power from the PC and get Mala and said plug-ins working to let you know for sure.  I can tell you, that the bearing is working great!  Also, be sure your driver wheel is on the BOTTOM of the monitor position.  You might also need to wedge some felt pads between the wooden cross brace and pizza plate on the side OPPOSITE of the motor, to force the plate to touch the rubber wheel.  This also will give you the tiny bit of friction you need to control speed.  I'm impressed personally, with the little amount of mounting height needed to make this work.  I feel this setup could probably be slimmed down even further for another idea I have brewing. (LOL, gotta finish this project first!)

Hope this was helpful to someone.  More info coming another weekend.

-csa
« Last Edit: March 23, 2008, 03:14:48 am by csa3d »

psychotech

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Rotating LCD Mount
« Reply #131 on: March 23, 2008, 02:29:10 pm »
 :notworthy:

That is just brilliant  :applaud:

Great design and clean execution along with an excellent documentation make this a must read for anyone planning to build a rotating monitor mechanism.

Eagerly waiting for some moving pictures ;)

Great stuff  :cheers:

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Rotating LCD Mount
« Reply #132 on: March 23, 2008, 11:18:26 pm »
I agree. Great work.
I am still working on rotating a 19" CRT. If you use an LCD, then I think you guys have the way to go.
I have been playing around with Weishaupts mala plugin and it seems to be working great for my setup.
I dont want to get all mushy here, but it is great to be able to share ideas and methods.
It would take forever to work this out if I had to start from square one.
Keep up the good work guys!

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Rotating LCD Mount
« Reply #133 on: March 30, 2008, 11:50:21 am »
Bezel Cut

This weekend was pretty busy with family matters, so I didn't get too much done.  I did manage to get the rotating monitor Bezel cut however.  The top sheet is 1/4" MDF, and the disk which I'll adhere to the monitor is 1/8" hardboard.  I managed to only screw up one piece of wood while cutting this, so not too shabby I'd say.  When cutting circles, and accounting for the router bit in the diameter, note to self, that you'll need to account for offsets on BOTH sides of the final diameter.   :dizzy:

If you're wondering what that white crap is on the corner.. well, I purchased a can of spray lacquer, and it had a black top.. and my stupid self assumed it meant it would be super shiny black.  WRONG!  Back to the store later this week.




-csa



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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Bezel Cut
« Reply #134 on: March 30, 2008, 01:45:24 pm »
Awesome job on the coin door.  I too just recently restored an old coin-door that I got off of E-Bay for $10.00.  I found that letting everything soak in a rust remover for a while got rid of all the rust and most of the gold plating as well.   :P  Still, after much hard work it looks awesome. 

I too used the hammered black paint and wasn't too happy with the results.  It didn't have nearly the same texture as I expected it to.  It also was much glossier than I would have liked.  So I went and got a semi-gloss black paint and painted over it with that.  It now looks perfect.

After finishing with the restoration, a friend of mine said "Why didn't you just use truck-bed liner?  It's the same texture, and color, and it is super durable."  After he said that, I smacked myself in the head for not thinking of that first.  It is incredibly tough and chemically bonds with anything it touches making it almost impossible to remove.  It has the texture, color and sheen that I would be looking for too.  Since it will still be a while before I finish my cab, I may strip the black paint off and go with the bed liner route.
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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Bezel Cut
« Reply #135 on: April 03, 2008, 12:41:43 am »
Truck bed liner?
That sounds interesting.
Please keep us posted as to how that turns out (pics too)
Csa3d:
Great job on the circle cuttin'

csa3d

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: LCD Rotations issues...
« Reply #136 on: April 18, 2008, 11:31:55 am »
Two steps forward, one step back!

So I've mounted the monitor, got the software rotation/wiring working at 75% completion, when a few things happen:

1.  I've realized that the weight of the 21.3" monitor is putting too much stress on the 5/8" area used as the rotation fulcrum (main bolt).  The pan has about 1/2" wobble, and this time, not around the bolt through the wood mount, but across the bolt head/pan intersection.  This is causing too much pressure being applied on the motor wheel, which in turn, causes the motor to struggle to the point of almost not being able to rotate in one direction, and needed a gentle push in the other direction.  A stronger motor might solve this, but at the same time, so would a redesign of how all the pieces fit together.  It makes me kinda grumpy to even think about redoing the mount, but it's not been a real joy mounting the cross brace by yourself.  So that will be one consideration in the rebuild.  Also, the spacing between the multiple bezels, I'd prefer to see mounted to the cross brace instead of the monitor anyways.  AND.. i feel the cross brace even when mounted with three screws on both sides of the cab, sill had a bit too much twisting capabilities.  I think next brace will be more "shelf" like.  Also to note, the umbilical cord of wires coming from marquee light, power buttons, and sound cords interfere with bezel removal.  More things to consider..

2.  While messing with trying to relieve the motor strain, I ended up tearing off one of those flimsy soldering mounts on the end of the hobby motor.  That's the second one that's happened to, so I have no spares.  Time to hit Hobby Lobby.

So right now:

1.  Everything is mounted, but will have to come out and be redesigned.
2.  A new motor will need to be purchased, or I'm going to have to see if parts are sold to fix my specific issue.
3.  Pulse modulation software still hasn't been proven to work in my rig yet, but using the "always on" config settings I proved communication with Mala using the Advanced Wiring 2 schematic in Weeisupts PDF.  We're discussing things over PM, but until the rig is fixed I'm back at square 1.

There it is folks.  Avoid the pizza pan :)

-csa
« Last Edit: April 18, 2008, 11:33:44 am by csa3d »

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: LCD Rotations issues...
« Reply #137 on: April 18, 2008, 01:09:30 pm »
There it is folks.  Avoid the pizza pan :)
Too bad it didn't work out. It looked sturdy enough.

Personally I gave up the whole idea of having a rotating monitor.
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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: LCD Rotation issues..
« Reply #138 on: April 18, 2008, 02:27:25 pm »
WOW csa3d!!!  Unbelievably awesome job - nice and clean and GREAT documentation.  Too bad you ran into some trouble - I'm sure you will work it out.  I've been out of the loop with my project but I have all weekend starting tonight to push forward!  Hopefully I'll get somewhere....   :cheers:

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: LCD Rotation issues..
« Reply #139 on: September 16, 2008, 12:38:49 am »
Any updates?  I'm very interested in this as I'm trying to decide on a cab and may redo a similarly designed one (completely gutted with no CP though)

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Rotating LCD Mount Solved!
« Reply #140 on: January 21, 2009, 10:58:45 pm »
Rotating Monitor Mount v3 - SUCCESS!

More work on the cabinet has taken place.  For the third time, I've redesigned the rotating monitor rig.  After two failed attempts, I've given into ways all ready proven to work and just accepted it.  The only thing "new" here is possibly using skateboard bearings AS the wheels for the lazy susan.  Here's how this went down:



I all ready cut out and painted the bezel and under bezel for revision two, and had also purchased all my parts from Solarbotics.com.  I only blew up 1 logic chip, and decided it was cheap to just order a new HDrive and Motor.  Since my last update, I only spent about $20 in new parts.  After a while, you re-use whatever you have laying around etc.  Who would have known I would reach this point in this hobby  :dunno  Also note that now that everything is working, a fresh sanding and coat of top paint could be used on my bezels after being installed and removed from the cab a bazillion times.



First, I decided to build a "box" this time around to house the entire lazy susan unit.  My previous rig was a single cross brace mounted to the cab, which supported the monitor and under bezel.  The upper bezel (square) was supported by brackets mounted to the sides of the cabinet and "floated" above the cross brace and monitor.  This had a design flaw, in which a) the upper bezel was NOT adjustable which led to b) rubbing of paint from the under bezel hitting the upper bezel due to play in the center axis.  This time around, I designed to go with the "lazy susan on wheels" idea and use adjustable pegs from dowels and clamps topped with Velcro to allow the upper bezel to flip open like a lid, while still being able to be adjustable if I needed to once mounted.  Flexibility was a must given the fact that this is revision 3.  This whole unit needed to be able to be pulled out and reinstalled many times, and with ease, if I needed to make adjustments to any one part of the unit until the design is truely bug free.

Secondly, this redesign permits the monitor cord connecting to the video card and the power cord to hang from the CENTER of the lazy susan, therefore more evenly distributing weight.  The last setup failed due to improper balance around the center pivot.  It was a goal of this build to eliminate that issue.

The above image is a result of the box, hinged upper bezel, and some wiring bits we'll get to shortly.



At the bottom of our base box, we need two wheels which will run along the side of the lazy susan circumference, giving bottom support to the platter on wheels.  You can see these at the bottom of the image above.  Also remember that my Midway Cab sports a 15 degree incline, so the lazy susan will not be held completely vertical.

I crafted two support wheels to allow the bottom of the platter to ride along the circumference seen here.  I wanted to make sure the wheels I used had a LITTLE friction as possible due to an over abundance of friction in the 2nd installment of the rig.  I therefore went with Swiss crafted Bones Skateboard Bearings, mounted to an "adjustable" 1 1/2" L-Bracket and a 1" L-Bracket.  The insides of the skate bearings are 8mm, so I found some metric metal inserts from the Home Depot parts drawers which fit perfectly into the center of the bearings, making the whole through the center much smaller while preventing the bearing from rocking around due to the snug fit.  Having the smaller center hole also allowed me to use much smaller metric nuts/washers, which worked out where I didn't need to drill out the holes of the L-Brackets larger.  I knew that if I had to drill out the holes, I was again allowing for imperfection due to possible spacing mismatches.  The inserts meant that this wouldn't be an issue at all.  I also purchased some rubber washers which were smaller then the red section of the bearing, so that they didn't come in contact with the moving parts of the bearings, yet kept the nut from touching either.

If you look at the gold 1 1/2" L-Brackets, you'll also notice that I took a dremmel disk to the one side of each of them.  Where there was one two screw holes, I fashioned out a slot.  This slot allowed me to make a slide bracket with the silver bracket, meaning I could adjust the final height of the platter supports later if need be.  This dimension was unlikely to change, but was one of those things I kind of made up as I went along.  If you can fine pre-made slots, then get some.  These have been elusive to me for some time.  As a side note, when dremmeling your L-Bracket, do where saftety goggles and DO screw it down before taking 10000 rpm's to it.  If not, it will fly out and you'll feel lucky it didn't hit you in the eyes or fly through the center of your monitor which you have laying off to the side of the work area.  Just saying...

Now that the lazy susan base has supports, we move onto the actual lazy susan itself, pictured here:



For the wheels for the disk bottom, I used 1" L-Brackets, and the same metal insert trick to bring the 8mm bearing hole down in side to the point where a  small nut and bolt could be used to attach the bearing without drilling any new holes, which would more then likely mess up "factory alignments".  My original plan with these wheels, was to go to the electrical department and pick up some 3/4" rubber grommets... ones used to keep water out of electrical boxes.  Why?  Because they slipped right over the bearing acting as a rubber tire!  How bad ass!  Unfortunately, that idea caused the bearing to spin ineffectively, and I lost a lot of movement.  In the end, I decided to let the lazy susan spin direction on the bearings themselves.



To prevent over rotations past 0 or 90, I fashioned stoppers out of small L-Brackets and felt chair sliders.  One gets screwed onto the bottom of the lazy susan, the other to the base upon which the lazy susan rests.  These stoppers will ultimately trigger my limit switches, which you'll see later.



This is the result of the under bezel being Velcroed to the top of the monitor.  The monitor is sitting on the 4 wheels we talked about above.



This is what it looks like sitting in the base, resting against the two lower support wheels we talked about above.



Wide shot to show the monitor in the base.  If you look close, you can see scratches on the inner bezel from the first two implementations of rotation.  When the unit is put in the cab behind the smoked glass, you cannot even see it.  If my OCD kicks in hard enough, I'll likely hit it with a light sanding and final topcoat once I'm done taking it in and out constantly.



I knew I would be removing the monitor mount several times until I go everything right, and wanted a way to easily gain access to whatever I needed.  I had a piano hinge laying around from an idea that I would be using it on my back access door.  I cut it to size of the monitor box and mounted it to the 1/2" MDF lid using some spare plastic spacers.  The reason for the spacers was because my screws were too long to the point where they would pierce the all ready painted lid if I was not careful.  I didn't feel like counter sinking them from the top, bondo the holes, and repainting so I went this route.  I learned that I therefore had to also knotch the base wall to allow the risers to fold under.  Again, my dremmel tool came in handy!



Here's what it looks like with the lid flipped down, monitor removed.



Driving the rotating monitor is a Solarbotics.com gearmotor 2 (with faster engine) powered by a hybrid Secret Motor Driver circuit DaOldMan has been helping me design.  Once we're solve a few minor issues, I'll post that here as well.  The motor was mounted at the TOP of the rig this time, because the weight of the monitor pushing down in my last implementation caused too much stress on the tiny RC motor.  I also dremmeled out the two holes in a 1 1/2" bracket again to create an adjustable slot, so I could slide the motor up or down slightly, adding or removing friction to the lazy susan as needed.  Remember, the key here is being able to adjust things!



In the end, the gearmotor's wheel touches the lazy susan's edge, and the friction from the contact and the fact that the lazy susan is swiveling on 6 bearings make this unit turn like melting hot butter!  I had thought the size of my monitor coupled with the extra weight from the birch disk would be worse then implementation #2, but I was far wrong.  This way almost turned too easily!  I found that I had to REALLY back down my gearmotor using Pulse Modulation.  In hind sight, I probably DIDN'T need the extra powerful motor.



Here is a custom circuit DaOldMan and I have been working on.  It's the standard red Secret Motor Driver H-Bridge, mounted to a breadboard.  The breadboard is wired up to the the power, limit switches, and printer port.  The switches are wired to look for signals going low on Pins 12 or 13 to stop rotation, while pins 2 and 3 control rotational direction.  Pin 4 controls Pulsing, and pin 25 grounds our circuit.  This setup completely separates the input pins from the output pins.  More on this circuit in a few days.



Here you can see I used a connector to splice a junction between the circuit and the switches.  This allowed me to reorder inputs, reversing rotation psychically without having to resolder.  It also means I can switch out my limit switches if I have to down the road.



For limit switches, I used some coin door switches I ordered from Divemaster some time back.  They actually never fit my Midway door, but came in perfect here.  They have a wire that sticks out, which you can bend and adjust the point of contact.  Based on how I decided to place my horizontal and vertical stoppers, you'll have to mount one of the swiches upside down.  To do so, you'll need spacers to allow room under the switch for the swing arm to move properly.  In this picture, you can see the switch, the limit arm unthrown, and the horizontal stopper.



This is that same horizontal switch, with the lazy susan mounted.  In this shot, the monitor is rotating towards the horizontal limit, but has not yet reached.  The two stoppers will eventually swing to make contact.



And when they do, the limit switch is triggered, shutting off horizontal rotation.



This is repeated for the vertical limit switch.  The only difference here is that this switch is mounted upright.



Here comes the rotating monitor!  Switches not yet thrown..



Switches are thrown in this image for the vertical limit.


« Last Edit: May 31, 2010, 10:32:28 am by csa3d »

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: LCD Rotation issues..
« Reply #141 on: January 22, 2009, 12:25:15 am »
That's why I hope one day there will be 1600x1600 square OLED panels with 1:10000 true contrast and 180/180 viewing angles.

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Rotating LCD Mount Solved!
« Reply #142 on: January 22, 2009, 09:22:11 am »
Holy. Crap.  EXCELLENT JOB!!!  Whenever I get back around to my rotating monitor project I will be using this as a guide. 

So am I right in thinking there is no center spindle?  You are just using the skate bearings on the edges to support and guide the rotation?  Is the weight of the monitor an issue at all?  What a great idea.

Have you interfaced this setup with MAME/MaLa yet?

Any chance you could sketch up a wiring guide for the switches, motor and parallel port?  Freehand on a napkin would be fine as long as it is labeled!

 :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy:

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: LCD Rotation issues..
« Reply #143 on: January 22, 2009, 10:06:41 am »
That's why I hope one day there will be 1600x1600 square OLED panels with 1:10000 true contrast and 180/180 viewing angles.

Yeah, I paid a pretty penny for my Viewsonic monitor.  It has a pretty high contrast rate and really good viewing angles.  Angles haven't been an issue for me, and I wonder if I could have gotten away with a cheaper monitor when it was all said and done.  It's a great monitor, 4:3 aspect, and as large as I could squeeze in the cab.  I'll ride the LCD train all day.  They are fantastic to work due to their size.. plus I don't fear getting killed due to having to drain them first!

-csa

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Rotating LCD Mount Solved!
« Reply #144 on: January 22, 2009, 10:19:34 am »
Holy. Crap.  EXCELLENT JOB!!!  Whenever I get back around to my rotating monitor project I will be using this as a guide. 

Thanks man!  I give credit to a bunch of rotators on the board for ideas.  I spent endless hours looking for those stupid tiny Zebra wheels used by Psychotech, which led to the skate bearing wheel idea.  Weisshaupts idea on the secret motor driver h-bridge make life easy for non-techies... but after my latest venture with DaOldMan, I might try crafting my own H-Drive next time if it were cost effective.

So am I right in thinking there is no center spindle?  You are just using the skate bearings on the edges to support and guide the rotation?  Is the weight of the monitor an issue at all?  What a great idea.

There are two sets of wheels, 6 wheels in total.  First you have 4 wheels mounted to the BOTTOM of the lazy susan at Cardinal Directions, turned so the wheels are parallel to the circumference of the platter.  When flipped upright, those four wheels allow you top spin the platter easily in a circle when applying weight.  The bad news is that those four wheels also allow you to slide the lazy susan up/down/left/right.  To prevent that, you need another set of wheels.  Look at this image:



Now draw a mental triangle from the bottom two red/gold wheels to the black motor wheel at the top.  The platter is placed upside down in the middle of that triangle, allowing the four wheels in cardinal directions to support the monitor and allow the spinning.  The two bottom wheels and the motor wheel prevent the disk from scooting left/right/up/down and sandwhich everything in place.  Make sense?


Have you interfaced this setup with MAME/MaLa yet?

Yes, and DaOldMan has a new MRotate2.exe which is under development which works perfectly with Mame.  We are working out some bugs yet, and hopefully Loadman is addressing some bugs in Mala with other non-mame emulator events.  More news on this shortly.

Any chance you could sketch up a wiring guide for the switches, motor and parallel port?  Freehand on a napkin would be fine as long as it is labeled!

Indeed.  That drawing is mostly done.  There's one more electrical issue I need to work out with the parallel port activating randomly upon windows bootup, and once I solve that, I'll report back with full drawings.

Make sure you bomb the Mala Forum and ask loadman to look at some of those rotation issues.   :angel:

-csa
« Last Edit: January 22, 2009, 10:36:36 am by csa3d »

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Rotating LCD Mount Solved!
« Reply #145 on: January 22, 2009, 04:47:46 pm »
Excellent work Chris!
And a very good writeup..

You know I have a touchscreen LCD monitor that I bought for my last juke project that came in with a bad touch node, the company sent me another one and let me keep that one...
Hmmmm.... wonder how it would look turned vertical?
Its only a 15" but might work great in a bar top or mini cab..

Now see what you done went and done? Got me started on another adventure!
LOL

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Rotating LCD Mount Solved!
« Reply #146 on: January 22, 2009, 05:29:48 pm »
Now see what you done went and done? Got me started on another adventure!

As do you!  I'm going to have to build that LED box it seems like to get an idea what the shizzle is happening when windows boots up.  I've wired 2 resistors into the circuit two times incorrectly now.  ON a good note, I'm getting better with my soldering skills.   :P   What a pain.

-csa

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Rotating LCD Mount Solved!
« Reply #147 on: January 22, 2009, 07:59:34 pm »
 ;D
Just keep telling yourself: "If it were easy, they'd have carnival monkeys doing it."


Edit: Just kiddin man..
« Last Edit: January 24, 2009, 06:32:53 am by DaOld Man »

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Rotating LCD Mount Solved!
« Reply #148 on: January 23, 2009, 10:47:53 pm »

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Seeking electrical help...
« Reply #149 on: January 25, 2009, 06:52:11 pm »
Rotating Monitor Circuit

I have finalized the wiring of my rotating monitor circuit largely due to the patience of DaOldMan and with some help from others on the board.  I'm going to try to summarize how to go about doing this yourself for those interested.  This post will probably take a bit of time to finish off and likely require me to go back and snap a few additional pictures.  Feel free to comment in the meantime.


Highlights
  - All parts can be ordered online and delivered to your doorstep or picked up locally at RadioShack
  - Command Line driven software rotation allows any Front End to reorient your monitor.
  - Circuit can be completely powered by a 5v connection to a PC power supply.


Warnings
  - User must be able to operate a soldering iron with a moderate skill level.  Some of these parts are small, and it's easy to accidentally solder small things together due to sloppy soldering.
  - When soldering and powering things to your computer, you assume all risk involved.  It is not my fault if you blow up your rig.  These instructions have been implemented at least three times and been proven to work if done properly.


Credits
  - DaOldMan:  Created the wiring behind the logic board and the software to drive the monitor rotation!  (BIG Thanks goes out!)
  - Weisshaupt:  Introduced BYOAC to the treasure that is the Secret Motor Driver "H-Bridge" kit and friction drive pieces necessary to accomplish powered rotation.
  - Psychotech:  Your simple manual rotation method using switches
  - Cornchip, Koz, Edge:  Other rotators who've inspired me to this achieve this point today.

Shopping List

  PCB Parts:
  1x    240 hole or smaller Perf Board (RadioShack)
  3x    2.2k-Ohm Resistors  (Radioshack catalog # 271-1325)
  3x    2N3906 PNP Transistors  (Radioshack catalog # 276-1604)

  Wires and etc.
  1x    DB25 to RJ45 converter
  1x    CAT 5 (ethernet) cable.
  1x    roll of 18-22 gauge wire (RadioShack)
  1x    12 block small terminal strip (RadioShack)
  2x    limit switches
  1x    box of wire crimps (blue and red things that attach wires to switches)
  1x    box of various plastic C-Clamp style wire tie downs + 1/2" screws (or something to mount loose wires to your wooden rig)

  Motor Parts
  1x    GM3 motor (easier to mount than the GM2)
  1x    Regular Motor 2 upgrade
  1x    The mounting Bracket
  1x    A wheel
  1x    A Extra Grip Tread (it is a friction drive after all- the more tire that meets the road)

  Electronics:  H-Bridge
  1x    A Chip socket (optional)
  1x    The secret Motor Driver Kit

   ( incomplete, to be filled in shortly )

Tools

  - Soldering Iron
  - Solder
  - Wire cutters
  - Needle Nose Plyers
  - Desoldering Braid (yes.. you'll use this more then you'd like!)
  - Crimping Tools
  - Utility Knife
  - Multimeter cable of measuring volts and testing for connectivity

Step 1 - Determine what your Parallel port does during Bios Load/Windows Bootup

Before you attempt to hook up anything to your parallel port, it's important to realize that you are powerless over the voltages supplied from the printer port during Bios load and Windows Bootup.  During these times, pins can and most likely WILL fluxuate from either low to high or high to low.  Low is to be considered in a state of "off", or reading below 1.5 volts, which High is considered to be "on", and will read anywhere between 4.5 and 5 volts.  Reading reveals this is probably due to Plug N Play trying to figure out what is attached on the parallel port.  Any time a single pin swaps from high to low or vice versa, you risk a signal being sent to your motor which will turn it on or off.  While this is the desired behavior when SOFTWARE controls the circuit, it is highly undesired that your motor randomly decides to rotate while your cabinet powers up.

Our goal is to prevent the monitor from moving before we are ready.  So your first step is to determine the bootup voltage changes.  This is pretty easy if you have a multimeter, and 20 minutes or so of spare time lying around.  Here is an example of the chart I ended up with:



How did I get to these numbers?
 
  1.  Grabbing a parallel port cable and plugging it into the computer with the cpu power turned off.
  2.  Create a blank chart with 24 numbers across the top, starting at 1, ending at 24.  These represent the results of all 24 pins.
  3.  Create a Start row on your blank chart.  This row represents the initial reading before the computer decided to change the value during any point of bootup.
  4.  Create an End row on your blank chart.  This row represents any change in voltage during any point the bootup process.
  5.  Cut two 6" lengths of small wire, the same kind you plan to use to wire your switches anyways.  This will work better if your inner wire is stiffer rather then tiny strands.
  6.  Strip both ends of both 6" lengths of wire.
  7.  Take the first stripped wire, wrap one stripped end around the negative probe tip of your multimeter's ground (black) wire.
  8.  Take the second stripped wire, wrap one stripped end around the positive probe tip of your multimeter's positive (red) wire.

  We do steps 7 and 8 because the probe tips of my multimeter were too fat to shove into the female end of the printer cable.

  9.  Take the exposed end of the wire attached to the ground probe of your multimeter, and shove it into pin 25 (ground) of your printer cable's female end (assuming the cable is all ready attached to your computer in step 1, there is only 1 end left to use, so this shouldn't be confusing.)  Make sure this wire is not loose and fits snugly down into the hole.  Think of this wire as a single pin going into the cable, temporarily attached to the printer cable.

  10.  Turn on your Multimeter and set it to read volts.  (see your multimeter's instructions on how to do this, mine had a yellow "v" on the settings dial)
  11.  Take the exposed end of the second wire attached to the positive probe of your multimeter, and shove it into pin 1 of your printer cable's female end (same end as step 9).  You will be moving this wire 24 times during our testing.
 
  You are now ready to begin charting!

  A.)  You should be able to lay the multimeter down, have it turned on, and both probe ends are connected to two different pins via 6" wire extensions.
  B.)  With the red probe extension shoved in pin 1, and the black extension shoved in pin 25, turn on your computer.
  C.)  Take note of the voltage number reading on your multimeter.  This number goes in your start row under column 1
  D.)  WATCH the meter readings as windows goes through the Bios startup, through the XP Progress bar screen, and up until you see the start bar on your desktop.
  E.)  Note any changes in voltage readings in the End row, column 1

  Congrats!  You've charted 1 of the 24 pins! 

  F.)  Shut down the computer.
  G.)  Now take the positive (red) probe extension, remove it from pin 1 and shove it into pin 2 hole.
  H.)  Keep the negative (black) probe extension shoved in pin 25
  I.)  Turn on your computer, noting start and end voltages just as we did above.
  J.)  When windows displays the start bar, go back to step F and repeat steps F-J advancing the red probe extension to the next pin in counting order until you've charted all 24 pins.

Once you have this chart created, you have a giant piece of the puzzle necessary to create the printer port logic switching circuit.



Step 2 - Secret Motor Driver "H-Bridge"

When a DC motor is supplied with power, it's default behavior is to run in only one direction.  If you want it to spin the other direction, you must reverse the polarity supplied to the motor.  This can be done manually with switches, but in this example we will build an H-Bridge to automate the reversal of our motor direction once it completes a 90 degree rotation.

There are many ways to go about building one of these.  In my example I used a tiny robotics kit from Solarbotics.com.



Since it's a kit, it comes as a package of loose parts.  It's up to you to solder everything together.  The awesome thing about the kit to me is that it's a kit, you don't have to worry if you picked up the right parts or not.  If you can put together an Ikea desk and have used a soldering iron before, then you're in business.  If you are up in the air about your soldering skills, then I'd buy the optional chip socket while you're shopping.  There are many small solder points needed to be made under the PCB, so you might want to practice a bit before taking on this kit.  Also note, that the rainbow ribbon supplied with the motor kit is very fragile after soldered on.  I recommend using CAT 5 (Ethernet cord) strands instead, as they are much more durable.

Follow the instructions accompanied in the kit to create the above completed circuit.  Give yourself a good 6" of extra wire coming out of main connections where it says to use the rainbow ribbon, and a good 2' of wire coming out of M1 and M2.



Step 3 - Limit switch logic board

Now that you've built your H-Drive, we need a way to know if your monitor is currently rotated horizontal or rotated vertically.  To achieve this takes many pieces including rotation logic software, limit switches, an H-Drive, and the limit switch logic board we are about to build which connects all these components together.



We are going to create the yellow PCB pictured above and then piggy-back our H-Drive from Step 2 on top.  You could decide not to couple the H-Drive and the Logic Board all in one unit, but by doing so you have less to mount and it just looks nicer.  Since no one is likely going to ask you to rip out your rotating monitor rig, appearance probably doesn't matter that much.  But this is BYOAC and you know you will have to post images of your work, so make it count.

The circuit necessary to create this logic is going to feel overwhelming when you first look at it.  It's really not that bad to solder together if you take it slow and are organized about how you go about it.  Here is an overview of the entire circuit as I currently have it implemented:

 
 click image to enlarge.

To make this easier to remove from the monitor housing, and to quickly swap around ClockWise and Counter Clockwise logic pins (without the use of software) I spit the above circuit up into three sections, separated by screw top terminal blocks:
  A.) Incoming Limit Switches
  B.) The logic board and H-Drive circuit
  C.) Motor Leads

( ... todo:  Create image to demonstrate )

With all the things that can go wrong with the circuit, you'll thank yourself later for compartmentalizing your wiring this way.



Step 4 - Interfacing logic board with limit switches

   ( to be filled in shortly )



Step 5 - Interfacing logic board with Motor

   ( to be filled in shortly )



Step 6 - Interfacing logic board with Parallel Port

   ( to be filled in shortly )



Step 7 - Powering the rotation circuit

   ( to be filled in shortly )



Step 8 - Rotation Software

   ( to be filled in shortly )



Step 9 - Integrating with MaLa Frontend

   ( to be filled in shortly )

-csa
« Last Edit: May 29, 2009, 11:36:33 pm by csa3d »

csa3d

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Documenting Monitor Rotation Circuit
« Reply #150 on: January 25, 2009, 10:13:41 pm »
While I finish documenting the rotation circuit, I thought everyone might like a peek at a video of this thing in action.  I'll get a better one done up a bit later.  Enjoy.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InOfVUMBFnc[/youtube]

-csa

patrickl

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Documenting Monitor Rotation Circuit
« Reply #151 on: January 26, 2009, 05:04:27 am »
That's very slick. Indeed nice how you have integrated the whole thing into one button press.
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csa3d

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Documenting Monitor Rotation Circuit
« Reply #152 on: January 26, 2009, 07:37:50 am »
That's very slick. Indeed nice how you have integrated the whole thing into one button press.

Well, actually two button presses of the same "select game" button.. at least until loadman squashes that Mala bug :)

-csa

javeryh

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Documenting Monitor Rotation Circuit
« Reply #153 on: January 26, 2009, 12:23:22 pm »
Wow - that is a perfect set up.  Very very nice work!   :cheers:

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Documenting Monitor Rotation Circuit
« Reply #154 on: January 27, 2009, 03:38:40 am »
This is very interesting..and a great reason to be on the forum,  I'll look carefully through the whole thread..I've just recently posted my design for my rotating setup as well, there are some great ideas here.

cheers

Ond

javeryh

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Documenting Monitor Rotation Circuit
« Reply #155 on: May 04, 2009, 12:04:28 pm »
What happened to the pics in this thread???  I can see some but definitely not all.  They are missing in the Rotating Monitor Mount v3 post and the Rotating Monitor Circuit post!!

csa3d

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Documenting Monitor Rotation Circuit
« Reply #156 on: May 04, 2009, 09:59:15 pm »
yeah, I have no idea what happened to them either!  After discovering this for myself, I kinda lost a lot of steam.  I think it probably happened during the image thread splitup, but haven't really searched them down.  I have been through 2 harddrive crashes since, so I have no idea which one of my spare harddrives have those actual images mirrored onto yet.

I've not really made a lot of progress on the cab short of futzing the software side of configuring things.

Let me know if you're able to locate them and I'll re-attach them.
-csa

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Documenting Monitor Rotation Circuit
« Reply #157 on: June 16, 2009, 05:32:55 pm »
yeah, I have no idea what happened to them either!  After discovering this for myself, I kinda lost a lot of steam.  I think it probably happened during the image thread splitup, but haven't really searched them down.  I have been through 2 harddrive crashes since, so I have no idea which one of my spare harddrives have those actual images mirrored onto yet.

I've not really made a lot of progress on the cab short of futzing the software side of configuring things.

Let me know if you're able to locate them and I'll re-attach them.
-csa

They appear to have been nuked by saint during the image thread split up (January 14 - February 16 appear to be lost and you posted on January 21).  I'm just getting back into my rotating monitor project and I could really use some help with those pictures - any luck locating them?

Thanks.   :cheers:

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Documenting Monitor Rotation Circuit
« Reply #158 on: June 16, 2009, 10:49:56 pm »
They appear to have been nuked by saint during the image thread split up (January 14 - February 16 appear to be lost and you posted on January 21).  I'm just getting back into my rotating monitor project and I could really use some help with those pictures - any luck locating them?

Thanks.   :cheers:

I have located them, just haven't had time to re-upload them.  I'll try get them uploaded here soon.  I did re-upload the circuit stuff, just need to get those monitor constructions pics back up.

-csa

javeryh

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Re: Galaxian Mame Conversion: Documenting Monitor Rotation Circuit
« Reply #159 on: June 16, 2009, 11:27:15 pm »
They appear to have been nuked by saint during the image thread split up (January 14 - February 16 appear to be lost and you posted on January 21).  I'm just getting back into my rotating monitor project and I could really use some help with those pictures - any luck locating them?

Thanks.   :cheers:

I have located them, just haven't had time to re-upload them.  I'll try get them uploaded here soon.  I did re-upload the circuit stuff, just need to get those monitor constructions pics back up.

-csa

Awesome!  I'll be diving into this over the weekend.  The final coats of poly are drying as I type this.  The t-molding should be here on Friday and then I can bring it into the house to install all the components...  :cheers: