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Author Topic: Router bit questions  (Read 582 times)

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vertexguy

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Router bit questions
« on: June 24, 2020, 11:14:08 pm »
This may seem obvious to pros but I'm wondering if there really is a significant difference between a flush trim bit and a straight bit

The only difference I see is the bearing on the flush trim.  My bearing is at the top by the router with the blades below it.  So wouldn't it behave the same as a straight trim bit if I lower the collar enough on the router to only have the blades on the bit below it, bypassing the bearing?

Wouldn't that work the same as a straight bit?

I'm hoping I dont have to buy yet another bit for routing my cp but dont want to take unnecessary risk if it's actually not the same. 




« Last Edit: June 24, 2020, 11:16:04 pm by vertexguy »

jennifer

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Re: Router bit questions
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2020, 02:21:08 am »
Depends what your cutting, that bearing is ment to follow an edge or template, where that straight bit is more for stationary cutting like a router table, Laminate cutters act like a bearing, but the stump end follows the work piece...The right bit for your application should be quite evident, make the cut where you want it, (test on a scrap save yourself headaches).

vertexguy

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Re: Router bit questions
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2020, 02:39:03 am »
I just have a craftsman 9.5 amp fixed based hand router. 

jennifer

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Re: Router bit questions
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2020, 03:10:44 am »
That thing is a work horse, I got one of those too...It is what your cutting is where you make the choices, for example a guide fence jig follow along with a strait bit, or if you are tracing a template use a bearing (simplified)...a chamfer on a hole can get really tricky with math physics and something like that would be a combination of a bearing and depth of cut.

Arroyo

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Re: Router bit questions
« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2020, 11:30:39 am »
My two cents....the flush trim bit is designed to be used to ride the surface of either a straight edge or more often a template.  Itís mostly intended to be used for making copies of something, but can be used for straight edge cutting as well.

While it in principle is no different than a straight bit hereís why I think you should avoid using it as one.  The value of the flush trim bit is in the bearing.  Itís why most experienced wood workers have given me the guidance of using it to cut minimal amounts.  You want to protect the bearing from gumming up and if used to do heavy amounts of cutting it will increase the likelihood of that happening.  In addition the pattern bits are all 1/2Ē in diameter, whereas most straight bits are 3/8Ē (there are of course various other sizes).  Using the larger diameter means more material being cut away which means more resistance, heat, etc that can contribute to the wear and tear on the bit.  Using a 3/8Ē diameter means less material, less resistance and less heat, and no concern about protecting a bearing.

Having said all this, the bearings are replaceable (something I didnít learn until more recently).  I have used the top bearing bit to cut A LOT of straight cuts.  Iíve since relied heavily on the track saw, itís easier to setup and doesnít remove as much material when cutting. 

So yeah you can use it, but Iíd start investing in things for their intended use, hence the straight bit where you can, and the pattern bit when you need to.  Hope that helps.

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Re: Router bit questions
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2020, 11:56:57 am »
Generally this makes sense to me, but now I'm confused about templating.  It sounds like I should be using at least 2 different bits for the process if done right?  IE If I had a jig / template of a joystick mount, I should use a straight bit to remove the bulk of the material in the middle and then a flush trim to get precise edges?  Is that the idea?

What about a mortising bit?  I read in someones post they recommended that for routing out joysticks.  Keep in mind though my router is fixed based so I don't think I can plunge cut.  Given that, I don't see the advantage for me over a straight bit in that scenario?



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Re: Router bit questions
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2020, 12:42:37 pm »
Generally this makes sense to me, but now I'm confused about templating.  It sounds like I should be using at least 2 different bits for the process if done right?  IE If I had a jig / template of a joystick mount, I should use a straight bit to remove the bulk of the material in the middle and then a flush trim to get precise edges?  Is that the idea?

Yeah, although if you have a jig saw or something else that can remove the bulk of material that would be preferable.  I try and use the router for minimal cutting (it removes a lot of material).  If you have a lot of material to remove better to use another tool.  Having said that yes you can do as you suggested.

Quote
What about a mortising bit?  I read in someones post they recommended that for routing out joysticks. 

Mortising bits are great to handle a 90 degree angle inlay (removal of some but not all the material).  It would be easiest with a plunge base.  But the main idea is it creates 90deg corners, as a router bit would leave a rounded corner.

Quote
Keep in mind though my router is fixed based so I don't think I can plunge cut.  Given that, I don't see the advantage for me over a straight bit in that scenario?

I only just started using a plunge base.  Itís really helpful for getting precise depth of cuts, but not a necessity to get things done.  If you have the ability to get one for your model router Iíd say go for it.  But if you are just starting out maybe just learn how to use the static base and see what all you can do with it (itís a lot).  Not sure if that answered your question?

bperkins01

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Re: Router bit questions
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2020, 01:23:58 pm »
I did a quick read through this thread - it sounds like you want to use your router bit as a saw..  its not a saw..

Pattern bits are for cleaning up cuts (from a saw typically) along a pattern (they have bearings)
Straight cut bits are typically used in plunge routers or on a router table to cut rabbets and dado's (groves)

Neither should be used to cut big pieces into smaller pieces..  Get a jig saw for that type of work

I did a lot of pattern bit routing here:  https://arcade-rescue.com/2018/05/27/lakeside-arcade-making-the-control-panel/
If you want to see it in action
My Arcade Cabinet Build and other projects here:
Centipede, Joust, Joust Cocktail, Asteroids, Galaga, Ms. Pacman Cabaret, Defender, Space Invaders Cocktail
https://bperkins.wordpress.com/

Mike A

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Re: Router bit questions
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2020, 01:27:12 pm »
 :stupid

Sorry. There is no emoji that says:

"I'm with the guy who knows his ---steaming pile of meadow muffin---."

I guess it is not as catchy.