Main Restorations Software Audio/Jukebox/MP3 Everything Else Buy/Sell/Trade
Project Announcements Monitor/Video GroovyMAME Merit/JVL Touchscreen Meet Up Retail Vendors
Driving & Racing Woodworking Software Support Forums Consoles Project Arcade Reviews
Automated Projects Artwork Frontend Support Forums Pinball Forum Discussion Old Boards
Raspberry Pi & Dev Board controls.dat Linux Miscellaneous Arcade Wiki Discussion Old Archives
Site News

Unread posts | New Replies | Recent posts | Rules | Chatroom | Wiki | File Repository | RSS | Submit news


  

Author Topic: Rotating Upright (Name TBD)  (Read 2257 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

DaOld Man

  • Trade Count: (+4)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4786
  • Wheres my coffee?
    • Skenny's Outpost
Re: Rotating Upright (Name TBD)
« Reply #40 on: November 01, 2018, 04:41:30 pm »
Good work going on here. Ive often though about rotating panels, but never attempted it. A few people on here have though.
Will be following!

Ond

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1596
  • build something
Re: Rotating Upright (Name TBD)
« Reply #41 on: November 05, 2018, 06:01:42 pm »
This is a cool idea which made me think a bit how I'd approach it.  I wouldn’t use slip rings at all.  There's no problem with twisting a wire loom through 90 or more degrees. You could rotate the panels back and forth with a geared stepper motor (which are really precise) and allow enough slack in the loom for a bit of twist.  A solenoid driven locking pin could be combined with the code for the stepper.  Just ideas for you.
You might think that you're scared, but you're not.  That isn't fear.  That's your sharpness.  That's your power.

yo1dog

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 323
    • MikeArcade
Re: Rotating Upright (Name TBD)
« Reply #42 on: November 06, 2018, 05:43:56 pm »
A solenoid driven locking pin could be combined with the code for the stepper.  Just ideas for you.

I was looking for a solenoid that would work but I am having trouble. Most of them have a short stroke at 10mm. I found this one with a longer stroke (35mm) but I would need to attach something to the spring side and I am not sure how I would do that. Any ideas?

https://www.banggood.com/DC-12V-35mm-Long-Stroke-Push-Pull-Solenoid-Small-Electromagnetic-Electric-Magnet-p-1217063.html?cur_warehouse=CN

DaOld Man

  • Trade Count: (+4)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4786
  • Wheres my coffee?
    • Skenny's Outpost
Re: Rotating Upright (Name TBD)
« Reply #43 on: November 07, 2018, 05:38:51 pm »
Is the panel going to have gears? If so you could possibly have the solenoid engage one of the gears to lock it in place.

yo1dog

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 323
    • MikeArcade
Re: Rotating Upright (Name TBD)
« Reply #44 on: November 09, 2018, 07:45:24 pm »
It really seems like locking the front panel and the control panel together is the way to go because it is simple, works very well, is easily accessible from the front, and accomplishes locking both the front panel and the control panel at the same time.

Along this line of thinking, I had another idea for a locking mechanism: bolting them together. If you could turn a bolt that was threaded into the front with the head above the control panel, you could pull the front and control panel together (see diagram below).

I've been toying with automating this project so I purchased this DC motor with a gear train and threaded rod attached. I didn't realize how comically small it was which is dumb considering they include a picture of it next to a coin. But, I tried it out anyway.

I made this little test setup:





I routed a channel for the motor to sit in and prevent it from spinning then I cut the slit for the washers and stationary nut to go in. Doubling up the nuts at the end lock them to the bolt and prevent them from spinning freely. This results in the motor, rod, and end washer moving away from the base when turning clockwise and towards the base when turning counter-clockwise.

It seems to work pretty well especially for how tiny that motor is. It creates a nice tight fit and the force on the joint goes from the wood to the washes to the nut to the threads and not on the motor. Next step is to mount it to my test rotating control panel setup.

Here it is in action:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCvIdQxOE80&feature=youtu.be
« Last Edit: November 09, 2018, 07:47:14 pm by yo1dog »

ark_ader

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5384
  • I build Arcade Controls for a hobby.
Re: Rotating Upright (Name TBD)
« Reply #45 on: November 10, 2018, 12:48:26 am »
All these ideas are great but unfortunately (as I am finding out on my new project) wood on its own is way too heavy. 

It needs to be lighter yet have the same strength to mount the panels (without wiggle), and then some plexi over the top.  Something like 4mm aluminum plate, layered between 9mm MDF and 4mm plexi.

Also there is a height restriction.  Rotation supplied by 3d printed gears and a drill motor.  It needs to run smooth.

I'm checking around some metal supply firms to see if there is any remnants as I will need only 5 panels (pentagon) which should give plenty of options.  I'll post my finds.

I'll be following this thread. Good work so far.  :applaud:

If I had only one wish, it would be for three more wishes.

yo1dog

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 323
    • MikeArcade
Re: Rotating Upright (Name TBD)
« Reply #46 on: November 10, 2018, 01:11:31 am »
wood on its own is way too heavy.

Are you referring to the control panel? Do you mean too heavy to rotate? If it is balanced and on decent bearings it should take very little effort to turn. Heck, even my test setup which is just wood on wood turns easily.

Jimbo

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 665
  • I have no idea what I'm doing.
    • Wood Finishes Direct
Re: Rotating Upright (Name TBD)
« Reply #47 on: November 10, 2018, 04:43:35 am »
Hey hey... all this prototyping is a great idea before you actually start doing it on the actual panels.  I still have the brake to sort out, but I'm clearer on the rotation....

It would be good to see a drawing of how your rotating panels sit in with this.

Keep it up mate  :cheers:

  
 

Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31