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Author Topic: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)  (Read 8967 times)

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hypernova

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Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« on: July 12, 2010, 09:21:46 pm »
I think I need to replace one of my outdoor spigots.  It leaks like a mofo through the handle when it's open.

I found some DIY sites, and they all said to take off the handle and nut beneath the handle, and a washer would be found.

There was no washer.  All that is visible is some thick glue or whatever stuff (white with black speckles).  Apparently called EPDM packing.  It's not removable.

So I think I need to replace it.  Trouble is, I don't know what I need to do specifically regarding disconnecting it.

We have PVC pipes, which turns into copper pipes right before the spigot, which makes me wonder which part I need to grasp to unscrew it from the piping.

I've attached a picture.  Do I need to grab onto the nut as pointed to by the black arrow and unscrew it, or do I latch onto the section as marked by the green arrow and unscrew it there, while holding the nut in place?

I'm assuming the second (grab the collar and untwist while keeping the nut unmoved.)

Am I right?

Also, I've measured about 7.75 inches of copper pipe leading up to the nut.  I'm assuming I'll need the 10 inch version of a new spigot (there's 8, 10, and 12 inch versions of spigots available).  Am I correct on that assumption?

Thanks!
« Last Edit: July 12, 2010, 09:24:08 pm by hypernova »
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eds1275

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2010, 09:40:09 pm »
If it leaks through the handle when you turn it on, then I would personally buy on identical to what you have, remove the handle and put the new one in. That should do it [unless of course your handle is totally different than the only style I am used to seeing].

If you need or want to replace the entire thing, you will need the following tools: pipe wrench, adjustable wrench, and teflon tape. Put the adjustable wrench on the bolt section where the black arrow is [on the copper], and try unscrewing where the green arrow is with your hands. If it doesn't go, try putting the pipe wrench on the grippy textured part and unscrewing. If it's still too tight, use a blowtorch for a few seconds over the copper joint.

J_K_M_A_N

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2010, 11:09:16 pm »
If it is a Woodford faucet you can replace all the parts inside without replacing the whole unit. (Maybe for other brands as well but the company I work for reps Woodford.  :)) If you can't find parts, you grab the copper piece with a wrench and unscrew  the rounded part (which should turn the whole faucet I believe). You will have to unmount it from the wall outside before doing this. It looks to me like a male end on that and the copper piece looks to be female. Good luck.

J_K_M_A_N

Kevin Mullins

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2010, 02:47:55 am »
A pic of the spigot itself would help.
Some of them will unscrew right off the end of the pipe, leaving all the copper and pvc pipe in place.
Otherwise it will unscrew where the copper fitting meets the PVC fitting. (hold the pvc,turn the copper)
Not a technician . . . . just a DIY'er.

LLUncoolJ

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2010, 09:53:09 am »
You may be able to do the rebuild kit if it is less than 10 years old and you can find the local distributor of that brand of valve. Even then, they may have to order it in.

The easier way is to replace it. Most likely you have the 8" version, but if there is a question, pull it out and take it with you when you go to buy a new one. Don't use a torch, you will likely warp, weaken, and/or melt the PVC. Put a wrench on each side of the white teflon tape (looking from the valve, turn counter clockwise)...MAKE SURE YOU TURN THE WATER OFF FIRST. You are lucky it is in an exposed, unfinished area. If you are very lucky, there may be a shutoff valve somewhere in the area. If not, shut it off where it comes into the house or at the meter.

One other thing, look up local plumbing suppliers and go to one of them to get a new one. The ones you will find at Home Depot, Lowes, Sears Hardware, etc are a lower grade than the type plumbers use...usually not full bore either.

One last thing, buy a little roll of teflon tape and wrap it around the male threads before you thread the new spigot on. I know this is elementary, but if it's the first time you've worked with plumbing, worth a reminder.
You probably remember me from such films as `The Revenge of Abe Lincoln' and `The Wackiest Covered Wagon in the West'

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hypernova

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2010, 06:29:30 pm »
If it is a Woodford faucet you can replace all the parts inside without replacing the whole unit. (Maybe for other brands as well but the company I work for reps Woodford.  :)) If you can't find parts, you grab the copper piece with a wrench and unscrew  the rounded part (which should turn the whole faucet I believe). You will have to unmount it from the wall outside before doing this. It looks to me like a male end on that and the copper piece looks to be female. Good luck.

J_K_M_A_N

It is indeed a Woodford Model 17..  I found a site talking about replacement parts for it.  Except how do I get under that EPDM packing gunk?  It's solidified, and not going anywhere.

If you are very lucky, there may be a shutoff valve somewhere in the area. If not, shut it off where it comes into the house or at the meter.

One other thing, look up local plumbing suppliers and go to one of them to get a new one. The ones you will find at Home Depot, Lowes, Sears Hardware, etc are a lower grade than the type plumbers use...usually not full bore either.

One last thing, buy a little roll of teflon tape and wrap it around the male threads before you thread the new spigot on. I know this is elementary, but if it's the first time you've worked with plumbing, worth a reminder.

They've got a shutoff right inside the basement where the main pipe enters the house, which is right next to the spigot.  I've used that when I did my first checks yesterday.

And you're right, it's all elementary stuff, for sure, but the input is appreciated.  Now to figure out if I know a local plumbing supply that isn't a home depot/lowes/etc.

Google-ho!
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J_K_M_A_N

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2010, 10:25:45 pm »
You can buy a repair kit here. Or find a repair parts place that carries them. Ask for an RK-17MH. You should be able to go to most plumbing wholesalers and buy from them. Most will sell to you. Just don't say you tried everywhere to find it...if you do that they will rape you. :) That comes with everything but the rod so you don't need to know what length. Just reuse the rod you have. The rod *ALMOST* never needs to be replaced. You should be able to just unscrew the packing nut and pull everything out. It should be pretty easy. If you need to, I believe you can reconnect the handle and pull the rod out if it is stuck (after taking out the packing nut).

That is the nice thing about Woodford's. You can repair them while they are still installed. (Just shut off the water. ;))

J_K_M_A_N

LLUncoolJ

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2010, 09:01:49 am »
Let us know how it goes. Always nice to file stuff like this in the back of my mind in case it ever happens me.
You probably remember me from such films as `The Revenge of Abe Lincoln' and `The Wackiest Covered Wagon in the West'

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hypernova

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2010, 11:48:20 pm »
You can buy a repair kit here. Or find a repair parts place that carries them. Ask for an RK-17MH. You should be able to go to most plumbing wholesalers and buy from them. Most will sell to you. Just don't say you tried everywhere to find it...if you do that they will rape you. :) That comes with everything but the rod so you don't need to know what length . Just reuse the rod you have. The rod *ALMOST* never needs to be replaced. You should be able to just unscrew the packing nut and pull everything out. It should be pretty easy. If you need to, I believe you can reconnect the handle and pull the rod out if it is stuck (after taking out the packing nut).

That is the nice thing about Woodford's. You can repair them while they are still installed. (Just shut off the water. ;))

J_K_M_A_N

Sorry...couldn't help myself.  That post was just too awesome!  :D
I'll exercise patience when you stop exercising stupidity.
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J_K_M_A_N

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #9 on: July 15, 2010, 11:15:10 am »
You can buy a repair kit here. Or find a repair parts place that carries them. Ask for an RK-17MH. You should be able to go to most plumbing wholesalers and buy from them. Most will sell to you. Just don't say you tried everywhere to find it...if you do that they will rape you. :) That comes with everything but the rod so you don't need to know what length . Just reuse the rod you have. The rod *ALMOST* never needs to be replaced. You should be able to just unscrew the packing nut and pull everything out. It should be pretty easy. If you need to, I believe you can reconnect the handle and pull the rod out if it is stuck (after taking out the packing nut).

That is the nice thing about Woodford's. You can repair them while they are still installed. (Just shut off the water. ;))

J_K_M_A_N

Sorry...couldn't help myself.  That post was just too awesome!  :D

I don't feel like a closet homosexual... :-\  :dunno

J_K_M_A_N

northerngames

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2010, 03:37:59 pm »
goofy setup for sure.

me I would cut the pvc right at the adapter where the yellow glue is showing the spot in your pic on the right closest to the copper pipe.

then add a coupler then go from there or you could add a new converter at that spot and convert it back to copper or stainless.

on mine the stainless pipe screws right into a threaded adapter made of pvc that is connected to the pvc piping.

so on mine the spicket threads onto the stainless pipe both side's of the stainless pipe are male threaded and on the other end of that pipe is the other male threaded part it then goes into the female threaded pvc pipe adapter/converter wich glues right onto the exsisting pvc piping to make a female threaded hole for the stainless pipe to screw into.

if you have trouble finding the right lengh steel pipe add a coupller in that spot and extend another pvc pipe to match your lengh needed and then add the converter to thread the metal pipe in order to get the lengh your after.

your pic looks like a rig job becuase of the little nut next to the big one to me but no pun intended.  

actually in oyur pic if you can get the big nut to unthread off the white pvc adapter then all you would need it the double threade pipe to the right lengh but you may twist the pcv and get a leek down the pipe somewhere this would be faster but there's the risk or just cut it off like explained and just rebuild it to a normal standard.

me I would cut it as its not really hard to cut glue or thread really but hopefully that may help ya  :cheers:
« Last Edit: July 15, 2010, 03:53:34 pm by northerngames »

LLUncoolJ

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2010, 05:53:42 pm »
The copper is all part of the spigot. the actual valve is near the threaded part. This is so that the water shuts off behind the wall/insulation so it won't freeze. Also, if you cut the PVC and plan to glue another female adapter on, they recommend PVC glue be given 24 hours to dry and set up before turning the water on. This is overkill of course, but I'd give it at least 12 hours...that's 12 hours with no water in the house, or at least that part of the house.

The least messy way is if you can get a rebuild kit like previously stated. The cleanest way to replace the whole valve is to unthread at the teflon taped joint.
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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2010, 11:39:43 am »
Wow I never heard of that before unless that was some terribly cheap pipe glue all the years in construction & road excavating and doing pipe work I have never ever seen nor heard of a guy saying O yeah I have to come back tomorow before I can continue becuase the glue needs to set.

if your plumber actually told you that he was either going to dick around the rest of that day or just after the/your money and making an excuse to come back the next day..

get the purple OATEY construction grade primer that most construction and plumbers use and the same type glue and your good to go in about 5 minutes but I never heard of anything pipe glue wise taking that long and I know no plumber has that amount of time to wait on glue to dry either hehe.

the actuall glue is like and smells like model glue and it dries the same within a matter of minutes not hour's or days.

there should be a shut off valve on the pvc behind the wall so you can shut the water off from inside and drain the pipe for winter once the valve is closed on the inside you open the outerside spicket to drain the remaining water out of the pipe to correctly winterize it.

also once its closed you could glue it all you wanted and even it for some unheard of reason you needed to let is sit for a whole day the only thing that is off and not getting water is the spicket your working on itself and only..

the spicket should thread onto the copper pipe but I never seen one where the pipe and spicket are welded together all as one piece either.

I have a main shut off for eveything and also a shut off valve on each sink, clothes washer, dish washer, garden hose, toilet, fridge ice maker etc.


if you cannot shut each thing off seperatly then you had a goofy plumber come through for sure.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2010, 12:39:41 pm by northerngames »

eds1275

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2010, 12:40:51 pm »
Up in canada here and probably other places, you get the faucet and pipe as one unit; it's double insulated inside to protect from freezing and expansion.

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #14 on: July 16, 2010, 12:47:01 pm »
hmm mine are double male threaded stainless and then the spicket just threads onto the pipe and the other end threads into a female pvc coupler.

are yours the thin copper instead and if so that may be the difference is the stainless is way thicker and therefor nothing insulated is needed?

on my setup you just shut it off in the house and open the outside spicket and then there is nothing in there to freeze or expand as it is left as an empty pipe.

I also don't have any copper pipe running to anything anywhere.

oop I take that back I have copper lines for the propane but we dont use them anymore becuase we went to a wood burner and electric water heater with an energy saver box attached to it becuase the propane furnace & propane waterheater are not friendly on the wallet these days and them type furnace's are power/energy hungry anymore and do a little kung-fu on the electric bill.

 
« Last Edit: July 16, 2010, 01:03:33 pm by northerngames »

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #15 on: July 16, 2010, 03:52:59 pm »
We sell Oatey pipe cement and primer by the case. I just went out and checked and it does say 2 hours. I was always told to wait 24, but nobody ever does. Weird it took me til just now to actually confirm that.

Any exterior wall spigot (at least in cold weather areas) is going to have the valve plunger behind the wall. I think what you have is just a boiler drain type faucet with a shut off rigged up for winter time. An extra shut off is a good idea. After mine froze in the wall and blew up a couple of years ago, I added a shut off in the unfinished part of my basement so I can shut the line down in winter and open the faucet to drain it.
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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #16 on: July 20, 2010, 07:45:38 am »
A little late to the party but I wanted to reply to this thread cause it makes me chuckle. I replaced all of my spigots a few years ago when I re-sided my house. I will never forget the the look on the guys face when I asked him where I could get a 12 inch sill-cock.  :laugh2:

hypernova

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2010, 10:21:43 pm »
I hope to be getting into it here, maybe this coming weekend.  Had another curveball thrown at me yesterday on an unrelated subject.

The gas trimmer stops running as soon as I take it off the choke.  I got it running once, but I needed to respool 3/4 of the job in, and couldn't get it started again.  Lore suggests that the carburetor is clogged up somewhere.
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hypernova

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Re: Replacing a spigot (outdoor faucet)
« Reply #18 on: July 28, 2010, 08:47:11 pm »
I tried to remove the spigot from the brass nut in the basement, but it would not move.  I didn't have the best tools for the job, but I know when I'm beat.

So I decided to buy the repair kit.

I opened it back up, and figured that white junk must be a lame-o replacement for the packing washer.  I took an X-acto knife, and managed to slice and dice the stuff out.  Pic below is what it looks like.

I put in the new rubber washer, and bingo!  Works like a charm.  No leaks on the handle.  Now I just need a washer for the hose end itself, but it's far less a problem than the handle.
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