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Author Topic: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects  (Read 10845 times)

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jlfreund

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Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« on: September 10, 2006, 11:44:27 pm »
INTRO + RECEIVING KIT:

A month ago, me and a friend from work decided to build a pair of cabinets.  We're currently about 80% done (and only 80% left to go)  :)  It's our first cabinet and the goal was to make it professional looking, cover classic games, and keep within a moderate time/money budget.

For my cabinet, I'm attempting a few embelishments that I'll try to highlight in the upcoming messages: master power switch, two headphone jacks, and volume control.

We considered building from scratch, but backed down and bought the Mameroom kits.  The main reason is because of the time factor to BYO, but we were also concerned that painting MDF wouldn't look as nice as laminate, and the only laminate we could find was $50/sheet countertop laminate.

We were extremely happy with the mameroom kits -- it was probably the best decision of the project.  The quality of the cuts and instructions were perfect.  All the holes and edges line up perfectly, and the best part is with two people working, we had TWO cabinets fully assembled in one day (actually about 8 hrs of work split over two days).

There were problems with the kit that I'll outline below, but due to the complexity of the design and shipping, I'm surprised that the problems were so minor...

- A few screws and fasteners were missing
- The keyboard tray drawer slides had the wrong parts
- About 5 boards got crunched in the corner during shipping (see last picture).
- There were a couple holes drilled in the wrong place
- The T-molding groove was maybe 1/16 - 1/32 off center.

The mameroom guy was very cooperative, mailing replacement hardware immediately at no cost.  I do think the package handling should be considered a problem, but hopefully the mameroom guys will keep an eye on this issue.  Although it sounds serious, I think the chances are in your favor that if there are a few crunched corners, that it won't impact the sturdiness or appearance, which was definately the case for us.  The wrong holes were interior and easily spotted, so it wasn't a problem, and the T-molding centering just caused the strip to stick out a few hairs on one side which isn't a big deal.

I'll talk more about working with the laminated MDF provided by mameroom in subsequent followups, but for now, I want to mention that if you plan to cut your own control panel from their material (as we did), I recommend buying or asking them to throw in an extra sample piece so you can practice your tools on it before cutting the final product.

Below are some pictures of receiving the mameroom kits. more to come...

Jason
« Last Edit: September 17, 2006, 07:00:38 pm by jlfreund »

jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2006, 12:24:28 am »
ASSEMBLING CABINET KIT:

First step: Assembling the cabinets... Even though the kit provided the T-molding and precut grooves, installing the T-molding was the most laborious part of the cabinet construction.  That, and assembling the top and bottom halves are definately two-man tasks. 

One idea I had is that before assembling the top and bottom, was to seal a few little cracks on top of the bottom half where the T-molding groove kind of makes the ends weak -- by repeatedly setting drops of wood glue into the area and clamping it shut (see bottom picture).  I don't know if this was necessary, but it definately made the adjoining surface stronger to support the weight of the top half.

One minor complaint I had for the Ultimate II is that the back panels just screw in with fasteners, so the monitor and comptuer areas are not accessable.  I chose to just leave off the back panels (for now).

Jason
« Last Edit: September 17, 2006, 07:01:01 pm by jlfreund »

jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2006, 12:42:27 am »
DESIGN CP LAYOUT:

Step 2: Build a control panel template.  We purchased a couple of control panel kits, but left the top blank so we could cut our own control layout. 

We narrowed down the choices to two designs (below).  The first one put the trackball in the middle, which is more typical, but we decided to go with the second layout which seems to be fairly different from other designs, but I think it has a few advantages:

- Having spinner down by trackball with 3 buttons provides best configuration for tempest and missile command.  If spinner were on top, it would be less ergonomic and it wouldn't have good access to any action buttons at the same level.

- Having the trackball between the joysticks, causes the two joysticks to be farther apart which is ok for two player games, but bad for two-joystick games like smash TV and crazy climber.  We found the joystick spacing of the second design to be a good compromise.  For two player, you're not so close you're bumping into each other, and for two-joystick games, your arms are at a more natural shoulder-width apart.

Another thing we did in the design was to raise the middle of 3 buttons for each button group to give a more ergonomic  feel.

I used a 1 1/8" forstner bit to cut the joystick and button holes - a great $15 investment from Lowes.  A couple words of caution when using this bit:

- When cutting plywood (for a template), be careful of slippage.  The plywood sheets can shear apart causing a 1/8" slip even after the bit is fully engaged through the first layer in the plywood.  This happened to me twice (out of ~20 holes), so I had to compensate when using the template to drill the actual control panel.

- When cutting acrylic (for the control panel overlay), be mindful of heat.  Using a template, heat isn't so much of a problem since melted plastic won't cause the bit to sleip.  Even so, I dipped the bit in a cup of water, twice for every hole to keep it cool when cutting through my plastic control panel overlay and MDF control panel top.

Jason
« Last Edit: September 17, 2006, 07:01:23 pm by jlfreund »

NightGod

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2006, 01:19:32 am »
I see hands slamming into a joystick when taking a big swing on that trackball in the second layout.
$6.75 the hard way-one quarter at a time.

TOK

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2006, 07:19:45 am »
I see hands slamming into a joystick when taking a big swing on that trackball in the second layout.

Definitely. My panel is laid out in a similar fashion and people first trying Golden Tee always hit the player 2 stick in their follow through until they get used to it.

Edit: Looking at the picture, then my panel again, my sticks are actually further apart and not as close to the trackball and still have a stick hitting issue. Unless you're not into Golden Tee at all, I'd move them further apart since it looks like there is plenty of room. Nobody that has played my cab has ever complained about the distance between the sticks for Robotron. I'd estimate its about 3" further than your setup.

« Last Edit: September 11, 2006, 07:26:03 am by TOK »

jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2006, 12:36:28 pm »
Ya, I thought about the golden tee problem, and I could've separated the joysticks another couple inches, but that would start to strain the SmasthTV configuration (an important one for me), and wouldn't do much to help Golden Tee (which I'm not interested in).  I'm much more interested in using the trackball for Centipede, Marble Madness, and Missile which doesn't require much open space behind the trackball.

Jason

NightGod

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2006, 03:02:06 am »
Why not go with the first configuration and add a second joystick to the right of each of the player's buttons-that way you can play two-player Smash TV ~and~ eleveate Golden Tee issues?
$6.75 the hard way-one quarter at a time.

jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2006, 02:46:04 am »
Ya, I thought of that (for the purpose of 2 player smash TV, not for Golden Tee), but didn't like the extra width.


jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2006, 06:37:12 pm »
CUTTING CP:

We finished cutting the control panels today.  It took about 5 hours to drill, route, and jigsaw out all the holes and beds for each one.  Cutting the control panel tops is the biggest job of the project.

For the drilling, we used a 1 1/8" Forstner bit -- an excellent $15 investment.  To drill the holes, we created a sandwich with: sacrificial scrap plywood on bottom, then 5/8" MDF control panel top, then the 1/8" acrylic cover, and finally the 3/8" plywood template on top.  All 4 pieces were clamped to the workbench.

There were two problems drilling the holes. First, when cutting the acrylic layer, it was easy to chip, even using the clamped sandwich and forstner bit.  On the first panel set, there were about 4 badly chipped holes (2 of which will be covered by the lip of a button and dust cover of a joystic).  For the second control panel, we didn't chip at all.  I think the main difference was that this time, when my buddy applied pressure to the top when drilling, he put his hands right next to the bit when I was drilling in the acrylic layer.  This extra pressure where it counts, combined with maybe more sensetivity when drilling the last 1/16 of the acrylic probably helped.

The second problem was with creating the plywood template.  When drilling the template holes, there were 4 (out of about 24) buttons that slipped due to the top layer of the plywood shearing off.  I didn't notice the slippage until the holes were all done.  To compensate for this, we had to move the template around and re-clamp when using the template to drill out the last few holes.  I think the work-around for this problem is to invest in some hardwood or MDF for the template piece.

The template was absolutely necessary for drilling the control panel.  Otherwise, you can't count on the forstner bit holding steady.

We also used a 3" hole saw for the Trackball hole on the acrylic that just plugs right into my hand drill.  Even though the hole saw has big teeth, it was the perfect size and did an excellent job cutting the hole.  Luckily, a friend let me borrow the saw because I think it's a $30 item.  We just sandwiched the acrylic between the sacrificial piece and a template piece of plywood on top that had a hole already cut out with the hole saw as a guide.

For the routing, we had to create beds for the joystick and trackball mounting plates.  Because our CP will be covered by a sheet of artwork, we didn't need to use jigs or get perfect edges.  We made the Joystick beds 1/8" deeper than the plate thickness because the stupid mounting plates don't have counter sunk holes for the screws that screw through the board (All sticks are Ulitimarc Mag Stick Plus).  But it doesn't really matter.

One difficulty with routing -- because we were eyballing it, it was very difficult to see the boundaries for the beds.  To solve that, we used masking tape to outline the beds -- which gave good contrast when looking though the router protective shield.  The masking tape was a nuisance as we dragged the router across the board, so we had to use scotch tape to tape the tape down so it didn't get caught on the router base.

The jigsaw work was extremely easy -- both drawing the pattern and cutting.  During the routing, hole saw work and jigsawing we constantly had to double check the positioning of the hole for the trackball.  Luckily, our Happ 3" trackball has a removable plastic gasket on top, which, when removed, gives you a nice lip that is exactly 3" dia and just the right height to lie flush with a 1/8" acrylic CP overlay piece.

Jason
« Last Edit: September 17, 2006, 07:01:39 pm by jlfreund »

jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2006, 06:53:58 pm »
MONITOR STAND AND BEZEL:

We also finished getting setup to install the monitor in the cabinet today.  My monitor is a 21" Dell CRT.  It was about 4 hours of work to:

1) Create a stand out of 2x4's and plywood to elevate the monitor to eye level
2) Measure and tape off the lexan bezel that was already cut to size
3) Tape off the monitor screen
4) Spray paint the bezel and monitor face black using hobby paint designed for lexan model car bodies.  It took about 1.5 cans of paint to put enough coats for the 25" x 27" bezel and face of the monitor.
5) Shim, level, and screw in the monitors tand into the cabinet
6) Install bolted eye holes into the cabinet to anchor some straps for holding the monitor steady.  Without the strap, the monitor would probably jiggle a lot under normal gameplay usage.  Even with the strap tightened down, I don't think the jiggle will be completely avoided because the Dell monitor stand  is kind of susceptible to bumps.  Note the bolts are very sturdy because they use a small washer on top and a big one underneith to allow me to tighten them down good.

Jason
« Last Edit: September 17, 2006, 07:02:00 pm by jlfreund »

jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2006, 07:33:23 pm »
SPEAKER AND AUDIO JACK MOUNTING:

The speakers are a $20 set of crappy powered speakers from a computer junk store called "Wierd Stuff".  They were new and larger than your normal crappy speakers, and it turns out the volume and quality are pretty good when everything is cranked up.

Mounting the speakers was very easy using some plastic strap found in the plumbing section of Lowes and some 1/2" screws. 

Creating holes for the two audio jacks was a little more tricky.  The problem is those jacks are so small, with only a 1/4" neck to stick through the board.  I had to route out approx 1.5" dia hole that was exactly 1/2" deep into the 5/8" MDF.  Then just drilled out 1/4" dia hole in the center for the neck of the jack to poke through.  That left a scant 1/8" poking through to actually tighten the nut that holds the jack in place.  Using a chisel helped to clean up the outer hole to get it really flat so the jack lies flush.  Even trying to be really careful, one of the jacks came out really well, but the other -- the center hole that drills through sort of chipped away some of the MDF.  Some black model paint and the nut that holds it in place should handle at least half the damage. 

The third picture shows the upright cabinet -- and the audio jacks will be just behind the lower strip of plastic on top that will hold the marqee in place.

I still haven't figured out exactly how I'm going to wire it all up with my speaker's amp, and the crappy volume control that came with my speakers.  I'm concerned that the Pot in the vol control won't work for both the speakers and headphone jack.  So either the headphone jack will need a separate vol control, or it will have to be before the volume control and I'll have to flip to windows to adjust the headphone volume.  I'm open to suggestions here :)

Jason

dudebozo

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #11 on: September 18, 2006, 12:03:01 am »
looking great so far, nice build.  looks like it's coming together nicely.  it sucks cause this stuff gets addicting.  sometimes i forget to eat, sleep, etc. while working on my cabinet.

"weird stuff", is this place up in the SF bay area?, up by the yahoo building (i think, or at least it was yahoo when i went to that place way back when).
i had a friend, i would call him "weird," that took me there.  his eyes lighted up; he loved that place.  actually found parts to fix my broken laserdisc, good stuff. 

i was just curious to see if it was the same place that i know of. 
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theCoder

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2006, 01:16:44 am »
I still haven't figured out exactly how I'm going to wire it all up with my speaker's amp, and the crappy volume control that came with my speakers.  I'm concerned that the Pot in the vol control won't work for both the speakers and headphone jack.  So either the headphone jack will need a separate vol control, or it will have to be before the volume control and I'll have to flip to windows to adjust the headphone volume.  I'm open to suggestions here :)
The volume control should work for both the speakers and the headphones.  Give it a try with a desktop PC to see if it works.

If you are brave enough, you can hack the amp inside the primary speaker to get at the volume knob.  I'm sure many people have written on this topic.  On the second page of my previous build (PartyBox  http://forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php?topic=53486.0 ) I did a write-up on how I hacked the volume pot to remote it to the CP.

Great progress !

jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #13 on: September 22, 2006, 11:43:50 pm »
looking great so far, nice build.  looks like it's coming together nicely.  it sucks cause this stuff gets addicting.  sometimes i forget to eat, sleep, etc. while working on my cabinet.

"weird stuff", is this place up in the SF bay area?, up by the yahoo building (i think, or at least it was yahoo when i went to that place way back when).
i had a friend, i would call him "weird," that took me there.  his eyes lighted up; he loved that place.  actually found parts to fix my broken laserdisc, good stuff. 

i was just curious to see if it was the same place that i know of. 

Yup, that's the place.  They have a steady supply of 21" Dell CRT for $90 which is a good monitor choice because it has a perfectly flat screen and face to lie flush with your bezel.

Last few times I was there, they even had a few used arcade cabinets (no monitors).


jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #14 on: September 24, 2006, 11:55:35 pm »
WIRING SOUND:

I've been fretting over the wiring of the volume control and headphone jacks, but finally went ahead and did it.  My $20 no-name computer speakers came in 4 pieces: an amp, an external volume control, and two speakers.  The jacks are $0.75 parts from another computer/electronics junk store in Sunnyvale, CA called "HSC"

Here are my notes for the headphone jack wiring:

  • Volume control should be matched to power range of amplifier
  • Computer and amp should both have volume control set to max
  • Plugging in headphones to Jack#P1 cuts out the cabinet speakers
  • Plugging in headphones to (just) Jack#P2 doesn
« Last Edit: September 25, 2006, 12:05:26 am by jlfreund »

dudebozo

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2006, 12:54:24 am »
oh man, this is totally bringing back memories of living in SJ.  i know where HSC is.  crazy stuff.  do you ever go to surplus computers?  man, i remember when i first went there, like way back in 99, they had that whole commercial gimmick of, "tell 'em that bubba sent ya."  hahaha, that was awesome stuff.  yeah yeah, we would make the weekly trip to fry's on brokaw, and if we didn't have our fry's fix for the day, hop back on the 101, take the lawerence expressway down to fry's in sunnyvale and hit up surplus computer on the way too.  sorry to get off track here, just some good memories of living in SJ.  whenever i make the trip up north to a sharks game, i gotta stop off at fry's. 

one quick question though, my friend is kind of interested in getting a cabinet like that.  he has the idea of that getting car speakers and wiring it to the creative 2.1 setup that a lot of people use.  is there any way of putting like car speakers on that speaker panel, or is it more like, gotta get out a holesaw to cut out holes for it?
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jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #16 on: September 25, 2006, 01:07:49 am »
Yup, Fry's, HSC, Wierd Stuff, and a half dozen others all in a one mile radius in Sunnyvale.  Nerd heaven. 

The UAII cabinets come with 4" speaker grills cut in them.  It would be no problem to screw in some car speakers from behind.  I was considering doing that, but it's easier to just strap some computer speakers in there since then you get the amp, vol control, and wire to the computer.

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #17 on: September 25, 2006, 08:22:42 pm »
Why did you mount the headphone jacks up there?  Won't the wires get in your way?  Lookin good.

jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2006, 05:58:33 pm »
Why did you mount the headphone jacks up there?  Won't the wires get in your way?  Lookin good.

Ya, it wasn't a great spot.  I tried it out with some headphones, and if I get the right-angle jacks, it's not too bad, but ideally I should have moved the jacks to the top of the sides of the cabinet.

Jason

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #19 on: September 27, 2006, 06:12:30 pm »
Looking good!

Keep up the good work - I can't wait to see the finished product.

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #20 on: September 29, 2006, 08:49:43 am »
I like the headphone idea, not for myself you understand, but for when the kids want to play (for hours and hours) and I have to do some horrible task, like balance the checkbook. It's just too darned distracting hearing that sirens song calling to me . . . c o m e . .  a n d . .  p l a y . . .

jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #21 on: October 01, 2006, 10:41:59 pm »
CONTROL PANEL:

Starting with all the parts, and the board and plastic cover all drilled, jigsawed, and routed, and a crimped wire harness for our MiniPac, we spent about 4 hrs building the control panel.

First, we sanded the corners of the acrylic using a sanding block we made out of fine sandpaper glued to a block of wood.  Sanding the corners was actually very easy -- the sandpaper does a great job on acrylic.

My friend had slapped together a simple "galaxy" image using some fancy paint or 3D program and we printed it out at the local printer for about $50 on nice photgraphic-like paper at 32"x32" (big enough for both control panels).  So the next step was to use a pen knife to cut up the edges and holes of the artwork.

Next, we installed the joystick, spinner, trackball, minipac, and buttons.  It turns out the wiring harness that comes with the minipack just barely reaches all the buttons on our stock Mameroom UAII control panel.  We didn't need to crimp any wires or cut and solder anything to hookup all 20 buttons + 2 joysticks.

Finally, using the minipac instructions, we wired up the panel.  Everything went very smoothly since we'd already made sure everything lined up during the cutting phase. 

We're almost done (with one of the cabinets -- the second is pretty far behind).  All that's left is waiting to receive the wiring harness for the trackball from Ultimarc, finishing up the bezel, plugging in 2 buttons left at my friend's house, and installing the control panel on the cabinet.  And of course then comes the software configuration :)

Jason


jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #22 on: November 23, 2006, 06:19:09 pm »
MOUNTING CONTROL PANEL:

After about a month off, we got back to it last weekend and basically finished my cabinet.  The second control panel went much better after we discovered the 1 1/8" hole saw cuts through our plexiglass cover and 3/4" MDF like butter.  Overall, we spent $100 cutting a $10 piece of plexiglass for the control panel cover.

There were several problems with the UAII kit in terms of assembling the control panel.  The first is that there doesn't seem to be a way to close all the fastener screws, which are on the inside of the box.  It's not too touch to get 5 sides of the box to fit together (though we had to remove some buttons after they were wired to get to the fasteners, which was a pain).  But getting that last side (we left the bottom for last) was impossible.  There's no way to reach in with a screw driver and close all the fasteners.  Luckily, the fact that the control panel sits on the bottom side keeps the thing together.

Another problem was that the kit uses short wood screws and L-brackets to fasten the control panel to the cabinet.  Not only is it flimsy, but the wood screws make it hard to take the panel on and off if you have to service it.

One adaptation I made there was to use special nuts that sink into the wood (see bolt picture, below), so that I don't have to use wood screws to fasten the control panel.  The bolts are much sturdier, and can easily be removed or reattached.  The measuring was a pain, and the panel ended up sitting 1/2" away from the monitor, but other than that, it worked great.

Another problem I had was that the keyboard tray is hard to get to and gets stuck on the control panel if you try to slide it out.  To fix that, I added some plastic strips to elevate the control panel above the drawer, and added a nice matching black plastic drawer pull.

I really hope Mameroom fixes the control panel assembly and mounting difficulties.  I never assembled the back panels of the cabinet because of the same problem -- the fastener screws are all on the inside, and I don't know how you can turn the last screw when all the panels are in place.

The last thing to see is the control cables coming out from the control panel.  The two USB cables are for the MiniPac and spinner.  The RCA cables have ground + 2 buttons spliced into them (coin1, coin2).  Once I get my coin door, I'll wire RCA female jacks so that I can easily unplug the coin door from the MiniPac.

Anyway, it's probably 95% done.  Left to do: Coin door is in trasit, the MameWah menu is all setup the way I want it, but there is still a lot of tuning for game menus.  Lastly, I need to cleanup and package up the computer and power strip and attach one back panel, and put everything in its place.  Maybe 2 more weeks :)

Jason

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Done and done.
« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2007, 07:45:12 pm »
Here are some parting shots of the final cabinet, with the coin door installed, pushed into it's resting place in my garage.  Post-mortem of the project:

Good thing:
- Getting the UAII Kit was the best decision.  The kit has some major assembly problems installing the last pieces of the back and control panel, and with mounting the control panel, but overall, the quality is much better than I could have done otherwise, the laminated material is better than I could have produced, and it cut the development time in half.
- 1 1/8" hole saw makes cutting the control panel and acrylic a breeze.  I spent over $100 trying to cut a $10 piece of acrylic before I tried the hole saw.
- The LCG3 power strip from SmartHomeUSA.com makes it easy to build a master power switch
- The wiring harness used to install two audio jacks took a while to figure out, but it's worth it.
- MaLa front end had some tricky things to work out, but in the end, it's a great front end with all the features, and it's very easy to use once you figure out what you're doing.
- The control panel layout works great.  I like having the trackball and spinner with their own dedicated buttons on the bottom row.  It let me bring the two joysticks in an inch or two closer together but there is still plenty of room for smacking the trackball in marble, and doing two player games.

Bad thing:
- Happ 3" trackball part sucks.  It doesn't engage both wheels for small angles off the main axis, and it seems to totally jam up every once in a while.
- I'm not happy with the Ultramarc Magstick Plus joysticks either.  Maybe they are the only 4/8 switchable from top, but playing robotron, it's extremely hard to shoot horizontal or vertical (diagonals work great).  Also, the travel isn't great.  Next time, I would buy a pair of reliable 8ways, and just add a dedicated third 4way stick in the middle somewhere.
- My audio jack placement is not ideal.  Should have put the jacks on the side of the control panel or something

« Last Edit: January 14, 2007, 09:06:13 pm by jlfreund »

leapinlew

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #24 on: January 14, 2007, 08:31:13 pm »
Wow! Looks great.

I know what you mean about the magstiks. I tried those as well. You can swap them out for some supers easy enough - they use the same bolt pattern and the supers have been.... uh... super! I really like them. You can't play 4 way games with them - but I'd say I couldn't play 4 way games with the magstiks so it wasn't a loss.

Timoe

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #25 on: January 15, 2007, 09:23:22 pm »
Smart control panel layout.  The spinner is well placed.

jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #26 on: January 16, 2007, 04:13:10 pm »
leapinlew> "You can swap them out for some supers easy enough - they use the same bolt pattern and the supers have been"

I might try a rev 2 on the CP with new joysticks and trackball sometime.  What are the "supers"?  Would I have to change anything else, like the route bed for the mounting plate or the hole that the base rests in?  Also, does anyone have a recommended alternative to the Happ 3" trackball -- ideally that uses the exact same bed and holes?

Timoe> Thanks -- I really like the layout, and the spinner works great with those buttons there. 

Jason


leapinlew

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #27 on: January 16, 2007, 04:18:39 pm »
I've heard of no one else complaining about the happ trackball. I'm curious if your problem can be solved instead of replacing it.

The Supers are joysticks from Happs. As far as any type of routing you did for the magstik+... I can't answer that. I never did route any of my joysticks.

jlfreund

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jlfreund

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #29 on: October 15, 2011, 10:23:11 pm »

equlizer

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Re: Mameroom Ultimate Arcade II projects
« Reply #30 on: October 16, 2011, 02:26:30 am »
The Sanwa JLW's would be a direct drop in as well.  Thats what i did.  Went from Happ ultimates to jlw's and havnt looked back.

  
 

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