Main Restorations Software Audio/Jukebox/MP3 Everything Else Buy/Sell/Trade
Project Announcements Monitor/Video GroovyMAME Merit/JVL Touchscreen Meet Up Retail Vendors
Driving & Racing Woodworking Software Support Forums Consoles Project Arcade Reviews
Automated Projects Artwork Frontend Support Forums Pinball Forum Discussion Old Boards
Raspberry Pi & Dev Board controls.dat Linux Miscellaneous Arcade Wiki Discussion Old Archives
Lightguns Arcade1Up --- Bug Reports --- Site News

Unread posts | New Replies | Recent posts | Rules | Chatroom | Wiki | File Repository | RSS | Submit news

  

Author Topic: Building a woodshop....recommended tools  (Read 20412 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

nostrebor

  • Not enough wit to effectively use this space...
  • Wiki Contributor
  • Trade Count: (+6)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1442
  • Last login:October 04, 2013, 02:02:41 pm
  • SHOCKING!!
Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #80 on: December 14, 2005, 10:00:13 am »
Sorry Chad, I was replying to Matt's post, got the red warning, and just posted anyway without checking to see what you posted.

What tools for cutting wood do you have available?

ChadTower

  • Chief Kicker - Nobody's perfect, including me. Fantastic body.
  • Trade Count: (+12)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 38215
  • Last login:June 17, 2019, 10:20:06 am
Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #81 on: December 14, 2005, 10:13:05 am »

At the moment, a circular saw, a zip saw, and various hand tools.  I'm not against buying the proper tools for the job if the cost is within reason.  There is a Black and Decker outlet a mile from my house that has a pretty strong selection and great prices...

nostrebor

  • Not enough wit to effectively use this space...
  • Wiki Contributor
  • Trade Count: (+6)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1442
  • Last login:October 04, 2013, 02:02:41 pm
  • SHOCKING!!
Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #82 on: December 14, 2005, 10:32:18 am »
Approach B&D tools with great caution. It is a tool brand that has name recognition and little else at this point.

Do you have a friend or relative that does woodworking or *ahem* finish carpentry?

The reason I ask is that I really don't know of a website or magazine that will give you what you want. If you go to bt3central.com and just shoot them straight right up front that you wanted to know the very basics, someone there would be sure to steer you in the right direction. Any other WW forum that I have read would dismiss you outright. WW forums seem to fill with snobs, unless heavily moderated to prevent it.

I grew up with a Dad and Granddad that were woodworkers. Spent a lot of time just watching, and being on the dumb end of stuff. Lived in a house that was "under construction" for 15 years, and was "forced" to work on it because that is what my family required of me. I actually avoided WW like the plague for years because it was my Dad's thing, and I don't care much to follow in his footsteps. But the bug got me anyway.

I know that you said that you did not have the time, but I guess what I am saying is that I had years of watching others, and that is where I picked up the basics. If you have someone that you can spend some time with, you will be able to very quickly pick up the basic things you are looking for. Even a day or two of watching/helping someone will give you a huge step up.

Maybe you could trade work with someone to do your window trim and such, and then spend the day or two helping them. In return, fix their computer or something :P

ChadTower

  • Chief Kicker - Nobody's perfect, including me. Fantastic body.
  • Trade Count: (+12)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 38215
  • Last login:June 17, 2019, 10:20:06 am
Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #83 on: December 14, 2005, 10:51:22 am »

This is one of my biggest issues when I am trying to do something outside of my area of expertise.  No one I am friends with locally does anything that would be of use to me in that way.  I rarely ever have anyone local that can show me how to do something practical.  I also tend to want to learn things from absolute zero up since I was taught that no matter what you're doing it should be approached with the proper respect.

My B+D tools seem good but I haven't done much with them yet either.

I'll head over to bt3central and lurk a while to see what I can pick up.  That's about the best I'm going to be able to do timewise for the forseeable future, I think.


Avery

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 212
  • Last login:May 03, 2013, 12:52:02 am
  • Have fun! Make stuff.
Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #84 on: December 14, 2005, 12:06:43 pm »
...it also has another use, and that is to face joint rough sawn lumber. Sure you can use a scrub plane and do it....

No argument, but he mentioned he had a planer.  Most of the time rough sawn lumber is rough but of even thickness, so you can just send it through the planer...if that won't work (say for a twisted board) you can cobble together a sled where you can hold in position while you put a flat face on one side.

If you do enough of that kind of work to justify the cost of good sized jointer then it's worth having.  I have found that mine tends to have table saw accesories stacked on it and I either go the planer or hand plane route.
Avery

nostrebor

  • Not enough wit to effectively use this space...
  • Wiki Contributor
  • Trade Count: (+6)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1442
  • Last login:October 04, 2013, 02:02:41 pm
  • SHOCKING!!
Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #85 on: December 14, 2005, 12:17:21 pm »
To me the real advantage to owning a planer is being able to use rough sawn material. I paid for mine in the first 3 projects with savings from buying RS lumber rather than s2s or s4s. I do use my jointer for trueing faces, ans squaring one corner, but I could get along without it If I had to. I would not give up my planer, unless it was to trade for a bigger one ;)

Matt Berry

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 131
  • Last login:September 11, 2018, 06:09:06 pm
  • llama kind of tastes like chicken
Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #86 on: December 14, 2005, 12:34:11 pm »
Chadtower
Using power tools or hand tools without the proper knowledge, training or techniques is a date for disaster. From the sound of your post you haven't even taken a shop course in high school.

These tools are Dangerous. They will cause amputations and other severe injuries if not used properly. This is very serious. I would highly recommend you seek out some sort of class either formal or informal some where. It will cost you a lot less in time and money to do this then suffer through a terrible accident with a tool.

Avery

I will agree that a jointer isn't "needed". I would say if you buy nothing but rough lumber all of the time, as I do, especially in large quanties you'll be glad you have one. It is definetley nicer then wrestling with a sled and planer all the time.

Nostrebor

I wouldn't recommend a complete neanderthal shop to anyone, those chisels are too dangerous :) Seriously though, I think there should be a happy median, a combination of handtools and power tools. I couldn't even imagine trying to rip a board with a handsaw, but dovetails should be done by hand (they really are not hard to do) Scrapers are a wonderful replacement to sandpaper and give an aewsome finish to the wood. They are not really that hard to use or maintain and you don't have to worry about all the dust.

It is kind of funny about always wanting bigger tools. I have a 15" planer and there are a few times I wished it was a 20", especially with the 17" wide planks of white oak I have.

big daddy

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 179
  • Last login:May 01, 2019, 12:16:13 pm
  • I'm a llama!
Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #87 on: December 14, 2005, 12:36:43 pm »
Quote

anyone know of a good site with tutorials for the beginner?  I need to start at a place like "this is wood.  This is how you cut wood.  This is how you cut wood at a 45 degree angle.  Don't cut your arms."


Not a site, but I can recommend a book.  "Woodworking.  The complete step-by-step guid to skills:techniques:more than 40 projects"

ISBN 0-7607-6013-6

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?ISBN=0760760136&pdf=y

It walks you through the different types of wood, the different tools and what they do, how to do different types of joins, etc.  In addition it has 40 or so projects with detailed instructions and walkthrus on how to build them.   It's heavily illustrated as the review says. 

 As a beginner who has finished his cab and now has interest in other projects, I've found it great.

ChadTower

  • Chief Kicker - Nobody's perfect, including me. Fantastic body.
  • Trade Count: (+12)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 38215
  • Last login:June 17, 2019, 10:20:06 am
Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #88 on: December 14, 2005, 12:42:08 pm »
Chadtower
Using power tools or hand tools without the proper knowledge, training or techniques is a date for disaster. From the sound of your post you haven't even taken a shop course in high school.

That's pretty much why I only have the circular saw and zipsaw... the minimum tools I needed to get specific jobs done that I was able to do at the time.

nostrebor

  • Not enough wit to effectively use this space...
  • Wiki Contributor
  • Trade Count: (+6)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1442
  • Last login:October 04, 2013, 02:02:41 pm
  • SHOCKING!!
Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #89 on: December 14, 2005, 04:44:46 pm »
Nostrebor

I wouldn't recommend a complete neanderthal shop to anyone, those chisels are too dangerous :) Seriously though, I think there should be a happy median, a combination of handtools and power tools. I couldn't even imagine trying to rip a board with a handsaw, but dovetails should be done by hand (they really are not hard to do) Scrapers are a wonderful replacement to sandpaper and give an aewsome finish to the wood. They are not really that hard to use or maintain and you don't have to worry about all the dust.

It is kind of funny about always wanting bigger tools. I have a 15" planer and there are a few times I wished it was a 20", especially with the 17" wide planks of white oak I have.

I just don't have time to go neander, but I do get a big kick out of the projects that show up on sawmillcreek in the neanderthal forum. Some of those guys are just ate up!

I use a nice mix of handtools and power tools, with a strong preference to power ;). As you mentioned, my new favorite is scrapers. If you have allergies, you will love these for avoiding sanding dust. Plus, if they are sharpened right, the ribbons of wood are thin enough to read through :)

What I really need for my shop is better dust collection. MDF has exacerbated the issue to the point that I have stopped using it for anything until I get moved into a new place, and have DC plumbing in operation. My absolute favorite is routering the stuff >:(