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Author Topic: Building a woodshop....recommended tools  (Read 20747 times)

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vader

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Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« on: November 15, 2005, 11:46:44 am »
Hey Guys,


I'm moving soon and my first order of business is to have a workshop.  It will be roughly 14 x 31.  My main order of business
is power tools.  I'm really kind of a dewalt guy, have a few of their tools, but I'm being realistic and know I cannot afford to furnish a
shop with all dewalt.  I'm looking at the Ryobi stuff now and wanted some opinions, I have their weedeater and its been great, but not sure on the power tools.  I welcome all opinions.  Here are the tools I will start with

Router ( currently have a Craftsman, collar slips, ack )
Drill
Table Saw  ( I plan on doing more than cabs in the future )
Jigsaw


Gimme some advice plz

Tim

RayB

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2005, 12:09:45 pm »
A hammer.
NO MORE!!

RayB

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2005, 12:10:00 pm »
A screwdriver.
NO MORE!!

vader

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2005, 12:24:58 pm »
Great replies Ray, never would have thought of those....I'm a craftsman guy there and have a pretty good assortment of handtools....I NEED POWER

Tim

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2005, 12:42:52 pm »
I received a 12V Ryobi cordless drill as a gift when we bought our first house a few months back, seems to have decent battery life -- granted, it IS only a few months old, but I've been very happy with it.  I think their other tools use the same battery packs.  Not sure what anyone else's opinion is about Ryobi, but for the price, they seem like a good deal.

vader

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2005, 12:48:32 pm »
Thanks brownshow...I wouldn't be going with any cordless devices....I'm gonna stick with corded power....granted I will have some cordless things, but I'm think table saws, jigswas and stuff

Tim

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2005, 12:51:46 pm »
DeWalt 18v drill, cant live without it, oh and if you have some spare $$ for this shop, get a porter cable router with a table and a good table saw.

nostrebor

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2005, 01:36:19 pm »
visit www.bt3central.com for a great woodworking forum. It is my other home.

If you are serious about woodworking I would want these items as a top 10:

1. Table Saw (most important to choose wisely here)
1a. Cordless Drill
2. Band Saw (14" min.)
3. Drill Press
4. Router(s) (Any good WW has at least 3 ;))
5. CLAMPS
6. Random Orbital Sander
7. Jigsaw
8. Jointer
9. Planer
10. Dust Collector (Ranks higher than most of these is you want to be healthy or work with MDF)

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2005, 01:56:05 pm »
other stuff that hasn't been mentioned...

a belt sander
a small power hand planer
a bench grinder (for sharpening stuff)
a vice
a dremel
if you make furniture, maybe a bisquit cutter

nostrebor

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2005, 02:00:40 pm »
BTW:

if you think building Arcade Cabinets is expensive...

vader

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2005, 02:09:39 pm »
BTW:

if you think building Arcade Cabinets is expensive...


I so know building other things is alot more expensive....maple vs. mdf....hmmm....

Tim

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2005, 03:20:15 pm »
I'd get a nice reciprocating saw.  Milwaukee / Porter Cable / DeWalt.
Ever think of a nice lathe?   Handy for turning a bat so you can protect your new investment. ;D
Bringing to life a child's imagination.

vader

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2005, 03:55:48 pm »
I'd get a nice reciprocating saw.  Milwaukee / Porter Cable / DeWalt.
Ever think of a nice lathe?   Handy for turning a bat so you can protect your new investment. ;D


Already got the milwaukee sawzall....never really called a reciporating saw...hehe....the lathe is a nice idea actually,
cause I would like to get into doing some tables and such
at some point, works good for legs....anyone got some workshop pics than can post, I want some ideas on setups

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #13 on: November 15, 2005, 04:32:53 pm »
If you plan on making alot of furniture and such, a jointer would be a good investment. Could start with a hand held model before getting the large 5"-6" type.

Not paying attention just re-read nostrebor's post and seen a jointer listed.


« Last Edit: November 15, 2005, 04:35:35 pm by D10 »

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2005, 04:35:06 pm »
don't forget a tape measure

RayB

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #15 on: November 15, 2005, 05:04:23 pm »
NO MORE!!

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #16 on: November 15, 2005, 05:38:35 pm »
If you plan on making alot of furniture and such, a jointer would be a good investment. Could start with a hand held model before getting the large 5"-6" type.

Not paying attention just re-read nostrebor's post and seen a jointer listed.




Thickness Planer.....I have one of those, but now I NEED a joiner!


BTW: I agree with nostrebor on the Tablesaw. I would invest in a Good Tablesaw first. Its probably the single most important tool I own. Get one with a solid steel top. They're heavy as heck, but man, do they work nice.

A few other things I use quite often:

A good square. Don't cheap out here. I use one where the blade collapsed into the handle.
A good set of router bits.
A Drywall square (four foot one).
100 Pencils (I hate looking for pencils, so I have a jar of 100 of them already sharpened
« Last Edit: November 15, 2005, 07:07:13 pm by Jabba »
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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #17 on: November 15, 2005, 06:28:26 pm »
holy crap!

How could I forget a compressor! You want a finish nailer and a brad nailer as well.

The forum I listed earlier has workshop pics. Look for any post by Rod Kirby. His workshop is stunning, and insanely clean.

I will also put in a little push for the Ryobi BT3100 Table Saw. Great starter saw that will not break the bank, and will perform extremely well when set up correctly.

Once again... www.bt3central.com

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #18 on: November 15, 2005, 06:44:31 pm »
I got a 14.4 Ryobi set a couple years back for christmas.  It included a drill, circular saw (small type) and a flashlight.  Right out of the box the saw wouldn't cut more than a board foot or three of 2x4 lumber.

Fast forward to about 8 months later...  The batteries don't hold a charge for shyte!  I don't use the saw anymore now that I have a corded full sized one which is probably a good thing because I doubt I'd be able to get through a 2x4 at all now.  The drill still gets used.  I'd guestimate that it gets about 10 min of run time on a charge.  Also, if you were to charge the batteries and leave them for a couple days they'd loose 50% or so of their charge.

Long story short, I'm not a fan of Ryobi!
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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #19 on: November 15, 2005, 07:33:43 pm »
Just inherited an older shopsmith

Pricey, but less expensive than buying 5 seperate tools.  I can't wait to set a small workshop up.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #20 on: November 15, 2005, 09:27:02 pm »
Love my dewalt and porter cable tools.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #21 on: November 16, 2005, 02:02:34 am »

 I personally do not like nails...  I recomend skipping the air nalier... unless you are in too much a hurry.

 I prefer to use long coarse thread screws.  That way,  if you ever have to dis-assemble something,  or decide to take it appart and want to re-use the wood.. its easy to do.   Nails can go in crooked,  hard to get back out without damage to the boards..ect.      Screws will hold better anyway,  and the structures build will have less play and wobble.  And.. screws are re-usable : )   unlike bent nails.

 A great table saw with a long table extention will be the best investment for the shop.   Theres many times when you need to cut something - and the table isnt long enough to have the guide in place.   I had to build my own.. but its far from perfect.  If I had to do it again.. Id get a better longer table.

 A new tool I just got and love..  is a metal cutting bandsaw from Harbor Freight.
Its very quiet (unlike an 'only for wood'  bandsaw),  and cuts metal like butter  :)
(simular to a slow moving hacksaw blade - without the manual effort :)    Much better than using those cutoff wheels.    Can cut wood too.. but I think its a little slow and limited in this regaurd.   (unless maybe if you changed the band-blade type)

 Ohh and another favorite of mine,  is the all might Drill Press.    At first.. I started out with a small 9" I believe..  but I kept running into problems with the shallow depth.   

 I finally bought a floor standing Radial Drill Press from H.F.  for like
 $189 +tax.     The thing is wicked!    Something like 23"  depth possible via a sliding head unit.   Also, the head can tilt to 90 degrees!   Great to use it like that with a polishing or sanding wheel.    Well worth the extra cash.    These things can do much more than a typical hand drill - such as use a circle cutter device.   Also just having such accurately drilled holes can be very important - esp when cutting holes in metal, where you want near perfect accuracy.

 a simular model:  http://www.atm-workshop.com/radial-drill.html

 I also Highly recomend the use of a Dust Collector.   HF sells a 2hp one for a good price.  They also have a hose kit for like 50$ too.   I hooked mine to the underside of my tablesaw (with a special nearly airtight undercariage I made)- to create a downdraft effect - and also have a 'Y-splitter'  that goes to the sander.   Either tube can be opened or closed for more suction power to either of them.
It was amazing how much dust was in the air after cutting some MDF.. and now with the collector on,  theres almost no dust at all.   

 I use a corded drill for many projects... but a year ago bought a black and decker 14volt cordless.   The thing has a removable head - and under it, lies a quick change adapter.  Great for drilling a hole.. realese the head, then drive the screw all without having to change the bits every time.   Even came with 2 batteries : )  I use that drill more than the corded one now.   :)   But, the more drills the merrier  :)


     

 

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #22 on: November 16, 2005, 05:19:46 am »
I have a Ryobi router as well as table saw, and I am very happy with both of them...

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #23 on: November 16, 2005, 08:25:13 am »
I will go on the list of folks that do not reccomend Ryobi cordless tools. A cordless tool that will see plenty of use (drill) should demand some $$. Bosch, Dewalt, Makita, etc.

The Corded tools work great, and generally do quite well in tool round-ups in the WW magazines.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2005, 05:13:08 pm by nostrebor »

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #24 on: November 16, 2005, 08:48:38 am »
...remember Harbor Freight for things like clamps, squares, etc.  i.e. Bar clamps at HD or Lowes might be $20-$30.  When they go on sale at HF I pick em up for $2-$5.

Like right now:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=38183
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=6985

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #25 on: November 16, 2005, 08:51:30 am »
I agree with those who said a good table saw is first on the list.  I have built several projects using nothing more than a table saw and cordless drill.  I would get the best one you can afford.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #26 on: November 16, 2005, 09:40:40 am »
WOW, thanks guys, I didn't expect this many replies or this much information.  I will mostly go with corded tools, the only cordless I will have will be a drill as that will be used for both woodmaking and household chores ( already have a 18v Craftsman, which I have no complaints about.  I've been looking at the 3100t Ryobi TS and it has got a lot of good reviews, ( have the compressor also, just need to wire that puppy up, but 220v scares me ).  I'm gonna do a search and check out that one guys shop mentioned in a earlier reply....

Thanks Again

Tim

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #27 on: November 16, 2005, 07:38:31 pm »
If you're serious, consider the investment in a higher quality tool..  You'll find that if you go to a real woodworking store you'll find a significantly higher quality tool for not much more money.  Personally, I have almost all Powermatic and JET tools..   Most important thing is the Table saw. Get the best one you can afford and try for a cabinet saw.. it's worth it.  From there, go for a good bandsaw, drill press, jointer, router table etc.. 

/b

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #28 on: November 16, 2005, 07:54:27 pm »
YEAH! Let's hear it for the 18v Craftsman Drill-o-tron!

I need an electric sander. The Buzzy kind!  :laugh:

-=XD=-
   

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #29 on: November 17, 2005, 02:05:00 am »

 Ohh, almost forgot,  I got a huge 3 section tool cabinet from sears last year.  The thing was perfect for all the tools Ive collected, and otherwise were scattered arround.

  I got it on 'black friday'  - which is fast approaching.   They didnt have any in stock, but ordered it for me at the sale price.  I think it was a little over 200$,  reg. priced at 300+  I believe.     


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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #30 on: November 17, 2005, 02:47:52 am »
If you can scare one up, get a panel saw. I got mine when the local Lowe's replaced it with a new one. It needed a little TLC, but it hadn't been hit by a forklift and the frame was still square. I hauled it home for $25, spent about $150 on on stuff to get it back in as new shape.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #31 on: November 17, 2005, 05:20:16 am »
very lucky tailgunner.   I do not think most would have such luck, and the new ones are very expensive.
 
 Panel saws that are at the home depots always cut crooked :(

 But more importantly,  theres a good deal of limited types of cuts you can do with a panel saw - because of the vertical mounting.   

 If i could get a perfect cutting panelsaw that rotated from vertical to horizontal.. that may be very interesting : )    Although, im not sure if i could hold the work while trying to push the blade...  ahh well..

 Nice thing about the panel saw is it takes up so little space compared to a tablesaw. 

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #32 on: November 17, 2005, 07:32:10 am »
if you are UK based i would suggest avoiding Dewalt as they are now owned by black and decker and built to the same crap standards as black and decker,

given the choice go for bosch every time, never managed to kill a bosch tool yet (had just about every other make blow up on me)

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #33 on: November 17, 2005, 09:52:02 am »
I don't know how serious you are about this yet, or even what you plan on building. First off it is an expensive hobby, don't buy cheap tools, try to buy the best tool you can at the begining. A couple of sources for information besides BT3central would be www.woodcentral.com or the forums at www.forums.woodnet.net. Woodnet has a tendency to sometimes be a little rougher crowd.

Stay away from craftsman powertools. Grizzly has some decent machinery at a cheap price, look to them for your jointer and such. There are a lot of tools I could list for a shop, start small and add from there. A dust collector should be the first thing you buy maybe a 1100 cfm to start or one of the expensive cyclone models from onieda (2hp dust gorilla).

Hand tools
Router (can't have too many) Dewalt 621, porter cable, milwaukee, bosch 1617evs.
Scrapers better finish then sandpaper
Hand plane and block plane
Chisels
Backsaw, handsaw, coping saw
Mallets (can make your own)
Sharpening stones oil and or water
Sharpening guide (if your not good at sharpening) leevalley MKII
6 or 8" grinder with better wheels
1-2-3 blocks
Feeler gauges
Tape measure
12" rule 6" too
Try squares
Sliding bevel gauges
Level
Marking knife and pencils
Belt sander (has it's place)
Random orbital sander porter cable
Clamps,clamps and more clamps (pipe,bar,spring, etc) Jorgenson, bessey etc.
12" Miter saw or sliding CMS dewalt, makita
Cordless drill dewalt, bosch, porter cable
Jigsaw bosch, hitatchi
Circular saw

Stationary tools

Bench with wooodworking vise
Tablesaw
14" or bigger bandsaw jet, mini max, lagauna, powermatic
Jointer perferablly 8" grizzly, powermatic, jet, delta
Planer lunchbox (dewalt) or 15" - 20"  floor model :) jet powermatic
Drill press 17"
Scroll Saw 20" Dewalt
Lathe mini lathe (jet) full size jet 1442 (best bang for the buck)
Accessories for the lathe chuck, tools (cost more then the lathe)
Compressor
6x48" 12" combination belt sander / disc sander

Knowledge
Forums, Books, Magazines Fine woodworking, wood magazine, woodsmith, shopsmith.

The worst part is that this is only the tip of the iceburg, and there is more then what I listed here. Good luck and make sure you check out the forums I listed, another one would be sawmill creek.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #34 on: November 17, 2005, 10:41:49 am »
WOW, I can see it will take me years to collect all the stuff I would need to have a productive workshop.  I'm not deadset on what I
will build yet, but I'm looking to just build benches and outdoor stuff
at the moment.  I really enjoy working with *WOOD*  ;D FIRE AWAY,
Looks like I'll save up some money, you guys say to avoid craftsman, so I guess the TS with cast iron top for 500 bucks would be no good, I'll continue to look around,...

Thanks ALot guys

Tim

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #35 on: November 17, 2005, 11:31:23 am »
I have gone through two (yep two) Ryobi belt sanders now.  They seem to strip out rather quickly.  I only paid for the first one and returned it for the second one.  So I'm either too hard on 'em or they use crappy gearing.  Eitherway I'm opting for a different brand when I pick up a new one (soon I hope).

I can't say much about individual brands but I will tell you this.  Suck it up and pay for the better model for whatever you buy.  The difference between a 14 volt and an 18 volt is remarkable.  The same goes for motor size on just about any saw (not to mention less stress on a motor that turns faster).  Also the compound miter is so much more handy then just a miter.  So what I'm getting at is the initial out lay may be more but in the end I believe you will get more use out of the higher end tool.  Good luck!

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #36 on: November 17, 2005, 12:13:19 pm »
Nope, your not too hard on the tool it just wasn't built to high standards. The more expensive tools use better and more heavy duty componets, bearings, heat shields etc. They are also built to be used for a longer period. That is why it is better to bite the bullet and buy the best.

Yes it will take sometime to build a shop. You could start out with a contractors saw, or you might want to look at the grizzly cabinet saw, it is more powerful and a lot better deal. They have a couple of closeouts right now too. The 10" 3 hp G1023s will set you back 895.00 + 82.25 freight.

Just make sure you really check out reviews before you buy any tool, that way you don't end up with garbage that causes you all kinds of headaches.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #37 on: November 17, 2005, 01:16:38 pm »
Here are the main tools I use with every cabinet I build:

- Tablesaw.  Actually I have two, both Craftsman.  One is a 10" belt-drive, it is a mammoth of a machine and will rip and cut almost anything.  The other is a 9" direct drive, small and lightweight enough to be portable but still one of their higher-end saws.  Expect to pay at least $300 retail for a new saw.  I have used some of the $99 specials from Black & Decker, Delta, Craftsman, and Harbor Freight, and every one of them was junk in my opinion.   Also, spend some money on blades.  In my "big" saw I keep a fast cutting/ripping blade, and the small one a finish blade.  Both are Freud, and cost about $60 each.  I have used them for several years, and they can be resharpened at a saw shop.

- Router.  I have a Skil and a Craftsman router, I have found that both are of the same good quality.

- Jigsaw.  I have used the same Craftsman jigsaw for the past 12 years.  Again, don't skimp on the blades.  I personally like the Black & Decker ones.

- Power sanders.  I have a Craftsman 1/2-sheet orbital, B&D 1/4-sheet orbital, a HF belt sander, and a HF detail sander.

- Drills.  I have an assortment of both corded and cordless drills, various brands (B&D, Craftsman, Porter Cable, Skil, and HF), and various sizes (1/4", 3/8", 1/2", and 3/4").  I use the corded drills for drilling pilot and countersink holes, and the cordless for screws.  Don't buy a cheap cordless drill.

- air finish nailer.  Get a name-brand one, I have broken two of the cheap Harbor Freight ones after using them just once or twice.  Air nailers do not require a big compressor to operate.

- Vises/clamps.  You can't have too many of these. I have five vises and at least a dozen clamps in various sizes.

- Chisels.  A good sharp set of these in widths from 1/4" to 1" comes in handy.

- Drill bits/hole saws.  Buy name brand, you will get what you pay for.

The most important thing to remember is to use the correct tool for the job.  I have just about every tool you can think of for woodworking and automotive work, but it has taken me about 14 years to get everything that I have.  A lot of my larger, more expensive tools were purchased at auctions and estate sales, you can pick up good quality stuff for about half the cost of new that way.  Also I have found that older tools are servicable, and if they are name brand (especially Craftsman) parts are still available.  Most of the new stuff today is worthless once it is broken.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #38 on: November 17, 2005, 02:27:25 pm »
I'm going to have to disagree a little bit with Mr Bubblehead. Many of the newer power tools can be repaired rather easily, but you have to purchase a reliable brand. Bosch, jet, grizzly, delta, dewalt, makita, and porter cable all can be serviced and replacement parts found.

Craftsman doesn't manufacture thier tools, they farm them out. 10 - 12 years ago they still used emmerson for thier tools, which they had some decent offerings at that time. After that Sears dropped emmerson in favor for another manufacturer who doesn't meet the same standard emmerson did. You really don't know what you are getting when you buy a craftsman powertool.

I will agree that skil and craftsman make a similar quality router. 10 years ago I had a craftsman router, after less then a year use the switch broke so I exchanged it, the new broke after a few hours use in the router table.

I have the craftsman jigsaw, random orbital sander, a 10" direct drive tablesaw, 12" CMS. I wouldn't buy any of them again. I have since replaced the jigsaw with a bosch, the ROS with a porter cable and the router with a dewalt, porter cable, bosch and milwaukee all of which are head and shoulders above the craftsman products I purchased 10 years ago.

The tablesaw works, but it is underpowered and the fence is garbage. It won't be long before it is upgraded to a cabinet saw.

Be careful buying used. Pay attention to see if it is single phase or 3 phase. Your best bet is to stay away from 3 phase. Also older machines use babbit bearings, which is servicable but you need to know how to do it correctly. Sometimes it cost more to referbish an old machine then to buy a new one (Don't get me wrong there is some good old iron out there) just try to know what you are getting into.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #39 on: November 17, 2005, 02:39:34 pm »
Craftsman doesn't manufacture thier tools, they farm them out. 10 - 12 years ago they still used emmerson for thier tools, which they had some decent offerings at that time. After that Sears dropped emmerson in favor for another manufacturer who doesn't meet the same standard emmerson did. You really don't know what you are getting when you buy a craftsman powertool.
My belt-drive table saw is about 40 years old.  :o  I've fairly certain that the Sears, Roebuck, & Co. manufactured that one. :)

But I will agree that Craftsman power tools have declined in quality over the past decade, as they are in fact not made by Sears anymore.

Another tool I forgot to mention is a carpenter's square.  Get at least two of them.  I probably have almost a dozen of those as well.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #40 on: November 17, 2005, 03:01:12 pm »
I have a DeWalt mitersaw and one of the things I dislike about it is the procedure for changing the blade. The manual tells you to loosen a screw that holds the guard on before you can get to the arbor screw. No problem right? Well that screw was driven into place by Thor himself! Trying to remove it with a screwdriver like in the manual resulted in stripping it all to hell. Finally I used my drill on the maximum torque setting and just barely managed to loosen it. Now I need a replacement. What bothered me about the experience was that the manual didn't specify what tool to use to remove the thing. Other than that though, the DeWalt saw is pretty nice.

As for a table saw, I'm saving my pennies for the Bosch 4009. After a marathon session of reading reviews and table saw roundups and the like, I've decided that the 4009 is the ideal balance between capabilities, price and portability.

Probably the nicest tool I've purchased so far is a Porter Cable 690 series router with a plunge and fixed base. Add to that a reasonably priced kit of Ryobi router bits and I can make control panels all day. The only problem with the porter cable is that it is orders of magnitude more complex than the Craftsman plunge router I used to build my cabinet. It has so many accessories and depth adjustments and the like that I was forced to read the manual (can you imagine?) over and over and practice with it many times before I felt as comfortable with it as with the craftsman. It's infinitely higher quality but has a steeper learning curve.

Finally a drill guide is extremely handy! I bought one for about $30 and it's like having a portable drill press. Very nifty.
Alright. it's saturday night; I have no date, a full bottle of Shasta and my all Rush mixtape....Let's ROCK!!

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #41 on: November 17, 2005, 03:26:05 pm »
The most important tool you have is the internet. All the forums mentioned are a great source of info. Obviously there are some woodworkers on this one too!

Read our opinions with a grain of salt though. Matt is pro high end tools. That's great, if you have the dough. Bubble has a mix of high & low end. That can be great, but do your homework. Analyze what you want to do with the tools, and how many hours you may spend using them. Some tools get used a lot (cordless drill, router, TS) Some a little or maybe once a year if you have a schedule like mine.

Most importantly, READ! epinions, amazon, forums, woodworking reviews (library or subscriptions) Some forums harbor tool snobs (woodnet) some harbor frugals (bt3central) so read them all, and make a good assesment.

I have spent hours researching tools, and I have spent time looking at how "I" will use them. I also have 20 years plus in amassing my tool collection (mostly car and metal fab stuff) and have made plenty of mistakes by using the "impulse method".

I guess I'm saying read, read, read. Then buy.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #42 on: November 17, 2005, 03:42:48 pm »
I do a lot of woodworking, and have owned just about every brand of power tool at one point in time.  In terms of quality and reliability, here's how I'd rank the manufacturers of hand power tools:

1) Milwaukee, Porter Cable, Bosch
2) Freud, Hitachi
3) Makita
4) DeWalt
5) Craftsman, Ryobi
6) Skill, Black and Decker

I'm sure I've left someone out.  But bottom line is look at which tools you'll be using the most, and buy accordingly.  For example, I have a Milwaukee reciprocating saw, but I don't use it much.  For the amount I use it, I probably could have spent
$ 40 less and bought a Ryobi.

I restored an old car a couple of years ago, and went through several angle grinders (burned up a Makita and a Dewalt).  Then I bought a Hitachi, and it's been excellent.

Even though they're not that high on my list, I have several Ryobi cordless drills that have been a great value for the money.  I wanted a couple that I could drop off of roofs and ladders and not be too upset if they broke due to the cost.  On the other hand, I acquired a Ryobi cordless saw that's almost useless.

-gary

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #43 on: November 18, 2005, 07:48:48 am »
The internet is definetly your best tool / resource. If you do decide on craftsman, instead of buying blindly use the product code and this link to see who made it. http://www.professional-power-tool-guide.com/Craftsman-Sears-Manufacturing-Source-Code.htm

I know craftsman still makes their handtools, but I'm unsure the exact time they started farming out their powertools. That is why craftsman powertools are sometimes good and sometimes not so good. It all depends on who is making that paticular item for them.

While I'm still not sure about when sears stop making their own powertools I will agree that the older craftsman (25 years or older) are usually pretty good and dependable. You just have to know what you are getting yourself into.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #44 on: November 18, 2005, 05:54:03 pm »
i love my bosch tools ;D i pretty big fan of there quality compared to some of the other powertools ive had in the past (skill and craftman to be exact,)

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #45 on: November 18, 2005, 06:18:29 pm »
Looks like I'll definitely be leaning towards  bosch, dewalt, porter cable for my power tools....still shopping for that sub 500.00 TS though...gonna have to put alot of thought into that

Thanks

Tim

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #46 on: November 18, 2005, 06:36:39 pm »
How do u guys feel about the Ridgid line of power tools at Home Depot, they seem pretty solid.

Thanks

Tim

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #47 on: November 18, 2005, 10:28:15 pm »

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #48 on: November 20, 2005, 01:10:55 am »
another handy tool to have in the woodshop is a scantily clad big breasted female assistant handing you your tools

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #49 on: November 20, 2005, 05:01:21 am »
It's been a while since I've been here, Ive been hanging out in the previously mentioned woodworking forums.  I'm slowly turning my small garage into a woodworking shop, so I've been spending a lot of time reading about tools.  I'll list some of the ones I've bought recently.

I bought a craftsman table saw last year.  It was on clearance for $350 (to make room for the new hybrids they are currently selling).  I used this saw a couple of times, and I was so frustrated, I let it sit for months.  The rip fence is horrible!!  A couple of months ago, I replaced the fence with a Biesemeyer.  The difference is amazing!  The fence is extremely accurate, and is a pleasure to use, of course it should be, since it cost nearly as much as the saw.  I also bought an aftermarket miter gauge (incra 1000se), so crosscuts are very accurate as well.  I now have about $800 into this saw, and I am now pretty happy with it.  If I could do it over again, I would buy a better saw for probably not much more, but I will live with mine as it is.  Definitely get a TS with a T-square fence (Biese or a clone), they are worth it.  A cabinet saw may be better, but for home use I think a contractors saw will work fine.  If the cost of a cabinet saw is too much, so is wood that will require one. :P

Last year, I also bought some other cheaper tools trying to outfit my shop quickly.  Some I have been happy with, others are just not very good.

Delta benchtop drillpress - I don't use this often, but it has performed well when I have used it.

Delta benchtop belt/disk sander - I just tried this for the first time a couple of days ago.  I wish I would have tried it when I bought it, I would have returned it.  It will sand, but it doesn't take much pressure to stop it.  I wouldn't recommend this one at all.

Firestorm 14.4v cordless tool set (drill, circ saw, sawsall) - I returned this the same day.  I cut 3 2x4s with the circ saw, and the battery was dead.  The drill didn't do much better.  I don't think I will ever buy a tool with the name Firestorm on it again.  Very disappointed.

Dewalt 18v cordless drill - When I returned the Firestorm set, I decided to try Dewalt.  The set was way out of my price range, so I just bought the drill.  This is probably my favorite tool.  It just works great!  With the 2 batteries it came with (not the real expensive ones), I never have to wait for a battery to charge.  It takes about an hour to charge, and I haven't been able to drain one in less time than that (or even close for that matter).  I would recommend this drill without hesitation, it is a great tool.

Bosch jigsaw - If I used a jigsaw as much as a cordless drill, this would also be a candidate for my favorite tool.  No complaints at all.

Hitachi 1/4 sheet palm sander - I'm not sure if I like this one or not.  I can't figure out how to fit a 1/4 sheet into the clamping springs.  The paper is just a little bit to short to reach.  If anyone knows what I'm doing wrong, please let me know.  I will reserve judgement on this tool until I figure out if this is just user error.

Skil plunge/fixed router - This works well, I have it mounted in the router table extension on my table saw.  I have never tried the plunge base.  I plan to build a router table next year, and I will probably put a bigger router in that table.  I will leave this one in the TS as a backup.  I would not recommend using a table saw extension router table as your only router table.  Don't get me wrong, it will work OK, but even though I have a very small shop, I will make room for a dedicated router table.  It takes a while to get the router set up.  If you need to make a cut on the table saw, you have to tear down the router setup.  Maybe with good planning, this wouldn't happen very often, but I wouldn't know anything about that. :D Overall, the Skil seems to work fine, and it is under a hundred bucks.  Not bad.

That's all the power tools I can think of from last years purchases.  Now on to this years purchases.  I will give my opinions on these tools, but keep in mind that I have not used these very much.  I am full into the acquiring stage at the moment, and that leaves little time or room in the shop to actually use the tools.  I am almost finished with the drywall in the shop, so hopefully I will get everything set up soon, and put this small fortune of tools (at least on my limited budget :D) to use.  I will try to come back and update this if my opinion changes with more use.  Some of my tools have not been used yet, and some of them are not assembled yet. I will list them so you can check them out if you want.  I've read a lot of tool reviews this year, so I hope my purchases were more informed than last years.

Grizzly 6" jointer - Still only partially assembled.  I've read a lot of good reviews on this one, and I think it will be a good addition to my shop.

Grizzly 8' grinder - Still in box

Grizzly Benchtop Oscillating sander - Just got this yesterday.  I tested it with a scrap piece of 2x6.  It seems to work well.  It is probably a lot less powerfull than other sanders, but it is a lot cheaper than others that I have seen.  The base is plastic, but feels sturdy.  With very limited testing, I am happy so far. I will be happier after I clean up the mess with the shop vac.  The shop is being drywalled, so this test was done in my dining/game/entry room.  I wouldn't try that if you are married though :D

I have read a lot of good things about Grizzly, and they have been great to deal with so far.  I plan to buy a 14" Bandsaw from them next year.  I would definitely check them out.

There is more, but I need to sleep.  This post got a bit long.  If this is usefull to anyone, let me know, I will post some more.  If not, I will get back to reading about arcade controls :D

Paul





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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #50 on: November 20, 2005, 12:18:07 pm »
For the tablesaw delta has a 10" model for under 500. It is the Delta 36-675 10" Contractor Saw with 2 Steel Extension Wings & 30" T2 Fence System, so far all the reveiws I've seen have been positive.

The 1/4" hand sander usually after taking a sheet of sandpaper and tearing it into 1/4's, slide one piece under the spring and clamp down. Then push the paper twords the other spring keeping it tight, slide it under the other spring and clamp down. It is a tight fit (for any 1/4 sheet sander) but pretty easy once you get the technique down.

Your other tool examples are prime examples why you should research every item before you buy it because all the manufactures make a few bad items.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #51 on: November 22, 2005, 01:42:19 pm »
How do u guys feel about the Ridgid line of power tools at Home Depot, they seem pretty solid.


I've got the 1/2" cordless drill and it kicks --I'm attempting to get by the auto-censor and should be beaten after I re-read the rules--.

The ratchet in the chuck makes slipping bits a thing of the past, and the 400 in-lbs of torque is enough to drive 4" screws into oak beams. The 30 minute charger is handy, too.

I have a Craftsman jobsite tablesaw that's pretty nice. It folds up to store. You need a rabbet blad for the table saw! I have a Delta Mitre saw and a Delta drill press, and they both serve their purpose. I wish the drill press were larger.

Bob

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #52 on: November 30, 2005, 12:48:30 pm »
Sorry to bump this old topic, but I thought of a biggie must have last weekend, I thought I should share.

My wife recently (jeesh a year ago now I guess) picked up one of the greatest tools I have ever owned.  At first I was sceptical, but was quickly won over.  If you plan to cut even board, you should drop the 100 bucks on one of these...a backyard fire pit!

We got ours from target and I bet I have burned 3 cord of scrap wood in that thing already.  Not only do I love it, but the trash collectors love it too!

I don't in anyway know about this vendor nor endorse them (first one on a google search), but they have lots of pictures incase you don't know what I'm talking about.  http://www2.yardiac.com/list_categories.asp?id=266&promo=Google

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #53 on: November 30, 2005, 01:46:49 pm »
That is a rather interesting way to get rid of scrap wood I must say.  I'm picking up a dewalt miter saw this weekend 10 inch for 200.00, need to cut baseboards in the house so this will be a good investment for the woodshop also

Tim

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #54 on: November 30, 2005, 06:54:58 pm »
holy crap!

How could I forget a compressor! You want a finish nailer and a brad nailer as well.

The forum I listed earlier has workshop pics. Look for any post by Rod Kirby. His workshop is stunning, and insanely clean.

I will also put in a little push for the Ryobi BT3100 Table Saw. Great starter saw that will not break the bank, and will perform extremely well when set up correctly.

Once again... www.bt3central.com

I'll second the above push for the BT3100.  I've got one and think it is a great value.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #55 on: November 30, 2005, 09:02:08 pm »
Sorry to bump this old topic, but I thought of a biggie must have last weekend, I thought I should share.

My wife recently (jeesh a year ago now I guess) picked up one of the greatest tools I have ever owned.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #56 on: December 01, 2005, 01:33:22 am »

 pcolson,   Ive got a firestorm drill and it works amazing.  I love the thing.
 The battery life seems quite long to me.    I did an entire shelfing unit that has 12 table sized shelves that pull out..  and has Tons of screws drivin into it.   After maybe 150+  3" long screws, I still had power...  and I may have used the drill earlier for other things.

 My guess is that you didnt fully charge the battery before you used the thing.   I believe that they arnt fully charged right out of the box.

 

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #57 on: December 01, 2005, 12:02:09 pm »
Am I behind the times, or is it still good practice to completely discharge a rechargeable battery before you recharge?

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #58 on: December 11, 2005, 05:30:16 pm »
I dont think you have to completely discharge them anymore.  At least the manual for my Dewalt 18v set ups says its not necessary.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #59 on: December 11, 2005, 05:33:27 pm »
Any recommendations on a store bought Router table?

Or would I be better off building my own?

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #60 on: December 11, 2005, 06:59:35 pm »
Any recommendations on a store bought Router table?

Or would I be better off building my own?

Build your own.  It may end up costing you more, but you can easily build the same basic type of router table as you can buy, and in addition, can customize it to your needs, such as adding a pin (not common AT ALL on cheap tables), a fence with stops in case you want to do semi-production work or simply don't want to have to mark the fence and pray you stopped at the right spot, better dust/chip removal/control, etc.  Search your local library, Wood magazine, the internet, etc to find ideas or plans. 

vader, pick up the roller stand for that thing unless you're gonna be building a miter saw station for the shop.  You'll hate having longer pieces of molding hanging off the edge, and the flex may cause you some headaches when lining up your cuts.  And I hate the clamps that come with the DeWalt's :(  Ridgid makes some decent tools, but you'll want to investigate your purchases of 'em.  Their shop-vac's are nice, that I can vouch for ;)

Somewhere on the net, there's plans for building your own panel saw.  It utilizes a plywood tray for the saw, which means you can easily make another for use with your router.  There was very little metal used in it, so it wasn't one of the "several hundred dollars to BYO" versions you may have seen.  I'd post it if I hadn't lost the bookmark but if I can find it again, I'll definitely repost it here.  IIRC it would cost ~$200-300 to build.
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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #61 on: December 11, 2005, 08:15:36 pm »
Re: Panel Saws

There's a pretty decent looking plan for a panel saw in ShopNotes magazine, issue #4.
According to their plan it should cost $134 for hardware plus the cost of wood. Looks pretty functional too!
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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #62 on: December 12, 2005, 10:37:27 am »
I've bee looking at the mitre stands, but you have a point...may be easier just build something....I have inside info that as xmas presents I got a bandsaw and radial drill press  ;D, don't know how much use I'll get out of those...but will look real nice in the shop

Tim

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #63 on: December 12, 2005, 12:36:45 pm »

I have inside info that as xmas presents I got a bandsaw and radial drill press  ;D, don't know how much use I'll get out of those...but will look real nice in the shop

Tim


A RADIAL drill press?  If I were you, I'd marry that woman ;)

I have a feeling you'll get quite a bit of use out of 'em.  Now you've gotta start looking around for magazines you'll wanna subscribe to.  Wood, Shop Notes, Fine Woodworking (although oddly enough, I like Fine Homebuilding a bit more ??? ).  There's a few more out there.

If'n you want, same offer.  If I can scrounge up the several-versions-of-plans for a miter saw station and scan 'em in and PDF-ize 'em, you're welcome to them.  Timeliness, however, isn't anything I'll promise, since I'm now trying to catch up/down/sideways with Stingray ;D
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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #64 on: December 12, 2005, 02:46:46 pm »
I have a bunch of small things around my house I'd like to change or improve.  I know very little about woodworking, though.

Anyone know of a good site with tutorials for the beginner?  I need to start at a place like "this is wood.  This is how you cut wood.  This is how you cut wood at a 45 degree angle.  Don't cut your arms."

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #65 on: December 12, 2005, 03:20:29 pm »

I have inside info that as xmas presents I got a bandsaw and radial drill press  ;D, don't know how much use I'll get out of those...but will look real nice in the shop

Tim


A RADIAL drill press?  If I were you, I'd marry that woman ;)



LOL....if I were married....I wouldn't be getting half this stuff, this gift is from my dad...my family gets nice presents for each other....


FYI....I'll probably take the press back...that is just way too much money for someone to spend even though i really want it
« Last Edit: December 12, 2005, 03:22:41 pm by vader88 »

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #66 on: December 12, 2005, 03:50:41 pm »
Re: Panel Saws

There's a pretty decent looking plan for a panel saw in ShopNotes magazine, issue #4.
According to their plan it should cost $134 for hardware plus the cost of wood. Looks pretty functional too!

Looks interesting.  I definitely don't have the room in the basement for one, so I won't be building one, but I'm very interested in seeing how it's done.  Does anybody have a scan?

-S

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #67 on: December 12, 2005, 06:06:29 pm »
Re: Panel Saws

There's a pretty decent looking plan for a panel saw in ShopNotes magazine, issue #4.
According to their plan it should cost $134 for hardware plus the cost of wood. Looks pretty functional too!

Looks interesting.  I definitely don't have the room in the basement for one, so I won't be building one, but I'm very interested in seeing how it's done.  Does anybody have a scan?

-S

I'll see if I can scrounge up anything.  I dunno what I've got, but I bought 2 mags with panel saw plans.  The first was ridiculous.  $500 in hardware ::)

Chad, Black&Decker's site tends to have a lot of really simplified stuff, and they offer some higher-skill stuff (well, higher than "how to cut wood" stuff anyway) too once you feel more comfortable.  http://www.blackanddecker.co.uk/index.asp?frmFirst=True&EOF=False&mktid=2

« Last Edit: December 12, 2005, 06:10:50 pm by DrewKaree »
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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #68 on: December 13, 2005, 09:02:36 am »
Chad, Black&Decker's site tends to have a lot of really simplified stuff, and they offer some higher-skill stuff (well, higher than "how to cut wood" stuff anyway) too once you feel more comfortable.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #69 on: December 13, 2005, 09:17:29 am »
Pick up a copy or subscription to Wood magazine it is geared twords beginer / intermediate level wood workers. Also another way to learn is to look for a class. There are schools that specialize in just woodworking and art. Some colleges offer woodworking courses too.

You can also learn a lot off from forums such as woodcentral, woodnet, bt3central, sawmillcreek, ect.

Vader I wouldn't return the tool, you should keep it.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #70 on: December 13, 2005, 09:24:16 am »

I definitely have to go the self learning/book/forum route.  There is no way I'd be able to find time to take a class.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #71 on: December 13, 2005, 02:36:38 pm »

Will read, thanks.  I want to start doing stuff around the house like replacing the old baseboard/window moldings with new stained moldings, but don't know how to cut at a 45 degree angle.   :-[


I end up doing piles of that stuff, and it'll be harder than just cutting a 45.  If you don't have one already, and want to do that, I'd recommend getting a power miter saw.  You'll find that a 45 is anything BUT a common angle.  Also, you'll want to read up somewhere on how to "cope" (that's the proper term, not to be confused with the "HOW THE EFF CAN I DO THIS?" feeling ;D ) moldings, since you'll want to use a coping saw for inside corners instead of just cutting the angles.  A belt sander and a dremel can also be your friend, if you're careful

In my project thread, you'll find a REALLY nice tool for figuring out your angles for outside cuts.  At the very least, invest in a cheap miter angle finder.  It's not the hardest thing in the world to do, but it will be something that's not the easiest thing in the world to do right, at least the first few cuts. By the time you reach the end of the moldings you're replacing, you should be fairly proficient, but you'll understand the difference between rough and finish carpentry.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2005, 02:38:31 pm by DrewKaree »
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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #72 on: December 13, 2005, 04:33:06 pm »

I don't want any Finns working on my house.  Swedes maybe but that damn Finnish carpentry ain't no good.


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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #73 on: December 13, 2005, 05:52:54 pm »
If you can stand the cost of a magazine subscription a great beginner one is "The Family Handyman". It covers all kinds of house stuff, minor furniture building, around the yard stuff etc. It is very basic, but even with lots of experience in woodworking and construction, I still find it to be an enjoyable read.

It is also Finnish free. NTTIAWWT

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #74 on: December 13, 2005, 06:05:09 pm »
You mentioned jointer - they're nice, but if you have a circular saw and a reasonably long edge guide, save yourself about $300by getting on e-bay and finding youself an old rusty Stanley #7 or #8 plane and a sharpening stone/guide. 

Once you clean it up you'll get a better edge in about the same amount of time (if you are starting with rough cut lumber - if you are just truing up finished lumber the jointer wins for speed but still not quality).  I used to scoff at hand planes - then I learned how to sharpen them properly.


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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #75 on: December 13, 2005, 06:28:03 pm »
I have a 6" x 48" bed jointer. I bought it from a co-worker for $50, still had the cosmoline on it, 20 years after he bought it! ;D

I like and use hand planes too, but the OP asked about power tools, so that is what I responded to.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #76 on: December 14, 2005, 09:31:34 am »
I won't argue the use of handplanes vs jointer, as I own both. There are some arguments for a jointer. While a jointer is used to edge joint rough lumber it also has another use, and that is to face joint rough sawn lumber. Sure you can use a scrub plane and do it, but when you have a stack of 100 + bf of rough lumber to flatten and plane, it definetely is a lot faster to do it with a jointer and 15" planer. After that you can use a smoother and scraper to get the ideal finish to the wood in a lot less time then doing it all by hand.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #77 on: December 14, 2005, 09:48:17 am »
If you can stand the cost of a magazine subscription a great beginner one is "The Family Handyman". It covers all kinds of house stuff, minor furniture building, around the yard stuff etc. It is very basic, but even with lots of experience in woodworking and construction, I still find it to be an enjoyable read.

I actually have a sub to that magazine... it is pretty good for some things, not so great when it calls for you to "cut all the boards as listed in materials" but you don't necessarily know how to do it.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #78 on: December 14, 2005, 09:54:46 am »
Using power tools vs. hand tools boils down to personal preference, and the time you have to spend using them. I have a 6 year old, and a 4 month old, a 50-60 hour a week job, and like 9 hobbies. I really need for my tools to be accurate, and FAST. Now you can get fast results from hand tools, but it takes time to tune them, and keep them in tune, and experience in their usage to be fast. I have yet to find the time to get to this point.

Something can be said for using Neanderthal tools. If you enjoy the sounds and sweat involved in hand crafting an object, they are the only way to go. For some folks, this is the ultimate woodworking experience.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2005, 09:56:46 am by nostrebor »

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #79 on: December 14, 2005, 09:56:32 am »

I'm not at that place right now.  Right now I would want quality results in a reasonable amount of time.

I don't need the quality of experience, I just need competence.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #80 on: December 14, 2005, 10:00:13 am »
Sorry Chad, I was replying to Matt's post, got the red warning, and just posted anyway without checking to see what you posted.

What tools for cutting wood do you have available?

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #81 on: December 14, 2005, 10:13:05 am »

At the moment, a circular saw, a zip saw, and various hand tools.  I'm not against buying the proper tools for the job if the cost is within reason.  There is a Black and Decker outlet a mile from my house that has a pretty strong selection and great prices...

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #82 on: December 14, 2005, 10:32:18 am »
Approach B&D tools with great caution. It is a tool brand that has name recognition and little else at this point.

Do you have a friend or relative that does woodworking or *ahem* finish carpentry?

The reason I ask is that I really don't know of a website or magazine that will give you what you want. If you go to bt3central.com and just shoot them straight right up front that you wanted to know the very basics, someone there would be sure to steer you in the right direction. Any other WW forum that I have read would dismiss you outright. WW forums seem to fill with snobs, unless heavily moderated to prevent it.

I grew up with a Dad and Granddad that were woodworkers. Spent a lot of time just watching, and being on the dumb end of stuff. Lived in a house that was "under construction" for 15 years, and was "forced" to work on it because that is what my family required of me. I actually avoided WW like the plague for years because it was my Dad's thing, and I don't care much to follow in his footsteps. But the bug got me anyway.

I know that you said that you did not have the time, but I guess what I am saying is that I had years of watching others, and that is where I picked up the basics. If you have someone that you can spend some time with, you will be able to very quickly pick up the basic things you are looking for. Even a day or two of watching/helping someone will give you a huge step up.

Maybe you could trade work with someone to do your window trim and such, and then spend the day or two helping them. In return, fix their computer or something :P

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #83 on: December 14, 2005, 10:51:22 am »

This is one of my biggest issues when I am trying to do something outside of my area of expertise.  No one I am friends with locally does anything that would be of use to me in that way.  I rarely ever have anyone local that can show me how to do something practical.  I also tend to want to learn things from absolute zero up since I was taught that no matter what you're doing it should be approached with the proper respect.

My B+D tools seem good but I haven't done much with them yet either.

I'll head over to bt3central and lurk a while to see what I can pick up.  That's about the best I'm going to be able to do timewise for the forseeable future, I think.


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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #84 on: December 14, 2005, 12:06:43 pm »
...it also has another use, and that is to face joint rough sawn lumber. Sure you can use a scrub plane and do it....

No argument, but he mentioned he had a planer.  Most of the time rough sawn lumber is rough but of even thickness, so you can just send it through the planer...if that won't work (say for a twisted board) you can cobble together a sled where you can hold in position while you put a flat face on one side.

If you do enough of that kind of work to justify the cost of good sized jointer then it's worth having.  I have found that mine tends to have table saw accesories stacked on it and I either go the planer or hand plane route.
Avery

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #85 on: December 14, 2005, 12:17:21 pm »
To me the real advantage to owning a planer is being able to use rough sawn material. I paid for mine in the first 3 projects with savings from buying RS lumber rather than s2s or s4s. I do use my jointer for trueing faces, ans squaring one corner, but I could get along without it If I had to. I would not give up my planer, unless it was to trade for a bigger one ;)

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #86 on: December 14, 2005, 12:34:11 pm »
Chadtower
Using power tools or hand tools without the proper knowledge, training or techniques is a date for disaster. From the sound of your post you haven't even taken a shop course in high school.

These tools are Dangerous. They will cause amputations and other severe injuries if not used properly. This is very serious. I would highly recommend you seek out some sort of class either formal or informal some where. It will cost you a lot less in time and money to do this then suffer through a terrible accident with a tool.

Avery

I will agree that a jointer isn't "needed". I would say if you buy nothing but rough lumber all of the time, as I do, especially in large quanties you'll be glad you have one. It is definetley nicer then wrestling with a sled and planer all the time.

Nostrebor

I wouldn't recommend a complete neanderthal shop to anyone, those chisels are too dangerous :) Seriously though, I think there should be a happy median, a combination of handtools and power tools. I couldn't even imagine trying to rip a board with a handsaw, but dovetails should be done by hand (they really are not hard to do) Scrapers are a wonderful replacement to sandpaper and give an aewsome finish to the wood. They are not really that hard to use or maintain and you don't have to worry about all the dust.

It is kind of funny about always wanting bigger tools. I have a 15" planer and there are a few times I wished it was a 20", especially with the 17" wide planks of white oak I have.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #87 on: December 14, 2005, 12:36:43 pm »
Quote

anyone know of a good site with tutorials for the beginner?  I need to start at a place like "this is wood.  This is how you cut wood.  This is how you cut wood at a 45 degree angle.  Don't cut your arms."


Not a site, but I can recommend a book.  "Woodworking.  The complete step-by-step guid to skills:techniques:more than 40 projects"

ISBN 0-7607-6013-6

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?ISBN=0760760136&pdf=y

It walks you through the different types of wood, the different tools and what they do, how to do different types of joins, etc.  In addition it has 40 or so projects with detailed instructions and walkthrus on how to build them.   It's heavily illustrated as the review says. 

 As a beginner who has finished his cab and now has interest in other projects, I've found it great.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #88 on: December 14, 2005, 12:42:08 pm »
Chadtower
Using power tools or hand tools without the proper knowledge, training or techniques is a date for disaster. From the sound of your post you haven't even taken a shop course in high school.

That's pretty much why I only have the circular saw and zipsaw... the minimum tools I needed to get specific jobs done that I was able to do at the time.

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Re: Building a woodshop....recommended tools
« Reply #89 on: December 14, 2005, 04:44:46 pm »
Nostrebor

I wouldn't recommend a complete neanderthal shop to anyone, those chisels are too dangerous :) Seriously though, I think there should be a happy median, a combination of handtools and power tools. I couldn't even imagine trying to rip a board with a handsaw, but dovetails should be done by hand (they really are not hard to do) Scrapers are a wonderful replacement to sandpaper and give an aewsome finish to the wood. They are not really that hard to use or maintain and you don't have to worry about all the dust.

It is kind of funny about always wanting bigger tools. I have a 15" planer and there are a few times I wished it was a 20", especially with the 17" wide planks of white oak I have.

I just don't have time to go neander, but I do get a big kick out of the projects that show up on sawmillcreek in the neanderthal forum. Some of those guys are just ate up!

I use a nice mix of handtools and power tools, with a strong preference to power ;). As you mentioned, my new favorite is scrapers. If you have allergies, you will love these for avoiding sanding dust. Plus, if they are sharpened right, the ribbons of wood are thin enough to read through :)

What I really need for my shop is better dust collection. MDF has exacerbated the issue to the point that I have stopped using it for anything until I get moved into a new place, and have DC plumbing in operation. My absolute favorite is routering the stuff >:(