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Author Topic: routing question  (Read 4203 times)

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big daddy

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routing question
« on: October 02, 2004, 09:05:48 pm »
Again, sorry with the woodworking 101 question, but I'm new to routers.

I need to route out 2 things
1) I have 3/4 inch control panel and want to route an area for my happs supers to recess into the bottom to give me more joystick.
2) I possibly need to route out the trackball faceplate once I mount it to get it flush with my cp.

I borrowed my father-in-laws router and he had a smallish bit that seems like it will do the job of routing out an area.  I set the depth correctly and on a practice piece of wood was able to route out a chunk of area at the right depth.

My issue is...I couldn't see what I was cutting!  So I was routing out an area but I couldn't tell exactly what I was routing out.  I see on some of the sites people have this perfect square routed and I can't figure out how you do that because if the router is face down I can't see where the bit is to know to stop at a certain point or to follow that rectangle pattern!  What type of bit are you using to route out these areas?  How can you follow what you're actually cutting?  Thanks in advance for the help.

nostrebor

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Re:routing question
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2004, 10:06:41 pm »
Assuming you are routing with a straight bit... your router will have a baseplate that is round (the piece that the router slides around on while you are cutting). Take a measuring device (tape, metal rule, etc) and measure from the edge of the cutter to the edge of the circle. Your trying to find the distance fron the slot that the cutter makes to the edge of the baseplate. Make sure that the measurement is from the edge of the carbide on the bit, not just the shank of the bit. Make a mark on your baseplate where you measure to for future reference, on the edge or side so that you can see it when using the router. Now lay out your square, or slot that you are going to cut on the workpiece. Once that is done, you want a straight edge, (scrap board, or plywood is fine) and a way to clamp the straight edge to the workpiece. Next lay out another line parallel to the cut line you already marked, using the measurement you took earlier from the baseplate edge to the cutter. This allows you to plunge the cutter into the work, and slide the router along, pushing it against the straight edge, thus controlling the cut.

Remember that mark you made earlier on the edge of the router base plate? That is the point that you slide along the straight edge.

Hope this helps!

Edit: tossed a pic on here. The circle is the base plate, the straight edge (top of pic) is set at the distance of the slot to the edge of the base plate. Ignore the edge guide comment, as it does not apply in your case.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2004, 10:18:54 pm by nostrebor »

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Re:routing question
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2004, 10:16:41 pm »
While you're giving advice to inexperienced routers, I'm going to buy a router tomorrow to rout for joysticks and a trackball and was wondering exactly what the type of bit I need to buy is called.

I always hear people say "straight bit," but is that what I'm going to ask for? Should it be a certain measure or type? Do I need any other parts to attach it to the router that won't come with the router or the bit themselves?

Thanks in advance!

P.S. I'm not trying to be a jerk and hijack the thread, but I know how some people here feel about "easy" questions and would just as soon not start a whole thread for this one.
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Re:routing question
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2004, 10:22:54 pm »
Google MLCS online and look at their "straight bits". If you are only buying one, get a 1" long x 1/2" diameter. This is a good all around straight bit. Make sure you get the right shank size for your router. Some are 1/4", some are 1/2". 1/2" is better if your router can use it.

« Last Edit: October 02, 2004, 10:25:10 pm by nostrebor »

DrewKaree

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Re:routing question
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2004, 12:08:25 am »
While you're giving advice to inexperienced routers, I'm going to buy a router tomorrow to rout for joysticks and a trackball and was wondering exactly what the type of bit I need to buy is called.

I always hear people say "straight bit," but is that what I'm going to ask for? Should it be a certain measure or type? Do I need any other parts to attach it to the router that won't come with the router or the bit themselves?

Thanks in advance!

P.S. I'm not trying to be a jerk and hijack the thread, but I know how some people here feel about "easy" questions and would just as soon not start a whole thread for this one.
There should be an HD near you, three that I can see....anyhoo, pick yourself up the Ryobi router - three base model.  It's a 2 hp model with an interchangeable motor.  Includes plunge base, fixed base, and D-handle base.  ~$120  It'll let you use 1/2" AND 1/4" shank bits.  Comes with an edge guide and carrying bag.

Yes, you will be asking for a straight bit.  Spend the extra money and get a CARBIDE straight bit, not the High Speed Steel (HSS) version.  The cut'll be nicer and the bit'll last longer.



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Re:routing question
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2004, 06:24:24 am »
Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the specific type of straight bit you'll need is a mortising bit.
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Re:routing question
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2004, 12:15:14 pm »
Glossary of Router Bit Terms

Bead: A small rounded raised profile routed on the edge of a work piece.

Bevel Cut: A cut made at an angle through a piece of work piece.

Biscuit Joint: A type  of glue joint in which an oval-shaped biscuit covered with a water-based glue is placed in slots cut in the edges of wood. The two pieces are clamped together, and the glue causes the biscuit to swell and create a tighter glue joint.

Blind Hole Routing: A method of routing in which the bit does not go all the way through the work piece.

Chamfer: (1)A beveled edge, technically one of 45 degrees. (2) A beveled cut made along the length of the edge of a board.

Cove: A concave profile cut into the edge of the work piece.

Crown Molding: A type of molding typically used as trim as well as to conceal the joint between walls and ceilings.

Dado: (1)A flat bottomed recessed cut made across the grain of a board. (2)A type of groove joint.

Dovetail Joint: A method of jointing wood at the corners through interlocking pins and tails.

Edge guide: A straight edge used to guide a router along a work piece.

Finger Joint: A joint in which a series of fingers, or tenons, are cut into the ends of the two pieces of material to be joined. The fingers mesh together.

Fluting: Concave half round decorative molding profiles.

Groove: A cut made with the grain of a board.

Kerf: In slot cutters, the width of the cutting edge.

Lap Joint: A joint made by placing one piece partly over another and bonding the over-lapped sections. Also called a halving joint.

Lock Miter: A type of joint made by fastening together interlocking parts with ends cut at an angle.

Miter: The process of cutting material for an equal-angle joint. Most miter cuts are made at 45 degrees so that they will form a 90 degree angle when they are put together.

Molding: A decorative profile usually used for trim work, to cover exposed edges or provide decoration.

Mortise: A round or rectangular hole cut into a piece of wood to accept a tenon. Also used to recess hardware such as hinges.

Mortise and Tenon Joint: A joint in which the tenon, or formed shoulder projection, of one board fits into a complementary mortise on another board.

Ogee: A decorative molding profile with a S shape, generally used for edge forming applications.

Piloted Bit: A router bit with a ball bearing above the cutter that keeps the bit a fixed distance from the edge of the material being routed.

Plunge Cut: A cut made in the interior of the work piece that receives another piece to form a joint.

Rabbet: An open ended cut made along the edge of a work piece that receives another piece to form a joint.

Runout: (1)The amount of wobble in a router bit, or how much the bit moves from left to right during use. (2)The splintering and jagged edges left by lesser quality router bits.

Score: To mark with lines or grooves.

Slot Cutter: A cutting tool used to make slots, rabbets, dadoes, lap joints and tongue and groove joints.

T-Molding: A T-shaped molding used to provide decorative or protective edges. T-Molding is inserted into a slot cut in the other piece.

Tongue and Groove: A joint in which the protruding ridge, or tongue, of one piece fits into a matching groove in the other piece.

Veining: The process of patterning with, or as if with, veins.

Definately buy carbide bits.

I use a router like drew posted if my cut is going completely through a piece of wood and for oak edging.  I use a smaller seam router for recessing stuff and laying laminates.

DrewKaree

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Re:routing question
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2004, 10:03:04 pm »
Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the specific type of straight bit you'll need is a mortising bit.
It's exact name is a "hinge mortising bit" (at least the CMT bit shown above is)

If you are picking up a bit for a PLUNGE router, it IS called a straight bit, and they'll make 'em with single, double, and triple "flutes" (although triples aren't common, and quite pricey).  

You CAN use the plunge router bit ("straight bit") in a fixed base router.  You will know them by their "flutes".  They'll come in single, double, and (not always easy to find) triple flutes.  The only difference is...more flutes, less material for each flute to take off, smoother cut.  The novice woodworker would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between a double and triple flute cut, but the difference between a single and double is more noticeable, as the single has to "hog out" more material.  

Get a double flute straight bit.  
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Re:routing question
« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2004, 11:26:35 pm »
While you're giving advice to inexperienced routers, I'm going to buy a router tomorrow to rout for joysticks and a trackball and was wondering exactly what the type of bit I need to buy is called.

I always hear people say "straight bit," but is that what I'm going to ask for? Should it be a certain measure or type? Do I need any other parts to attach it to the router that won't come with the router or the bit themselves?

Thanks in advance!

P.S. I'm not trying to be a jerk and hijack the thread, but I know how some people here feel about "easy" questions and would just as soon not start a whole thread for this one.
There should be an HD near you, three that I can see....anyhoo, pick yourself up the Ryobi router - three base model.
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DrewKaree

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Re: routing question
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2004, 12:57:34 am »
i am looking at getting a router for christmas and came across this recommendation during my search.  just out of curiousity, what are the fixed base and d-handle base for and how often does anybody use them?  i ask because the cheaper ryobi router is around $70 for 1.5 hp while the three pack is $150 for 2 hp and the extra pieces.  just wondering if it is worth it.
I have a router table, and I have the fixed base installed in there, as the motor just screws right into it, so I am ALWAYS easily capable of throwing something on the router table quickly.  And P.S. don't EVER buy one of those POS router tables from sears/home depot/lowes, etc.  Build your own.  Seriously.  There's plans I can pass on to you, and you'll find it WAY more versatile and useful than the pressed steel bolted together chintzy versions they sell.

The D-handle makes it WICKED easy to go around larger panels with one hand, BUT I DO NOT RECOMMEND YOU USE ONE HAND ONLY ON YOUR ROUTER UNLESS YOU HAVE LOTS OF EXPERIENCE WITH A ROUTER!  USE THE "EAR" SECOND HANDLE!  When I do the edge of a deck, it's just like zipping across it with the saw to profile the edge of all the boards.....it's one of those things that, until you've used it, you don't realize how nice a D-handle is.  My Porter Cable didn't have the "ear" on it, but again, HEED the warning above!

I use the plunge base for everything else.

I DON'T use this router for work, I got it for "around the house" use cuz it was nice and cheap!  I originally got it to replace my nice one until I could afford a replacement for my nice one. 

Give it a week or so, that three pack router only cost me $120.  For only $50 extra, I got an extra 1/2 Hp, and one DARN versatile router! 

I'm not positive, cuz I don't know specifically which other Ryobi router you were looking at, but the three base set handles 1/2" AND 1/4" bits.  The extra 1/2 Hp will help when driving the larger shanked bits too.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2004, 01:04:51 am by DrewKaree »
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Re: routing question
« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2005, 11:15:30 am »
Where can we find your router table DIY how-to?

DrewKaree

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Re: routing question
« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2005, 05:59:24 pm »
I'll try to scrounge it up.  I took the plans from somewoodworking magazine.  The one I built is a fairly well copied version, there are several minor variations floating around in other mags and on the internet, perhaps I've still got one of 'em bookmared.

I'll drop it in here if I find it, right  now I'm just checking in, then I'm back to "real life" ;D

And it's really bugging me - who's the guy in your av?  He looks like a thinner version of Glenn Beck!
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Re: routing question
« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2005, 06:20:36 pm »
My avatar is Huell Howser.  He has a pack of Public Broadcast System shows in California.

Here's his site http://www.calgold.com/

His shows are so cheesey, but I just love them. 


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Re: routing question
« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2005, 06:21:47 pm »
Actually decided to find it before I went out in case there are questions.  There were several pages, I'll give them to you in order of "niceness"

The most BASIC of router tables.  Nothing fancy, just functional, not a lot of "dressing up"

The next step up.  Same basic principle as the next link, but not as much storage, and seems cheesier

The less cheesy version of the last one, with a touch more storage

Mine.  If you can access Workbench Magazine, that's where I think it came from.  I get several woodworking magazines, so I'm guessing, since that site says it's Workbench or Woodsmith, and I don't get Woodsmith.  Mine isn't nearly as nice looking, but it's just as functional.  Save some money, either find it at your local library or purchase the back issue it was in.  It'll be cheaper that way.  My scanner no worky, so I can't scan the plans.  If your library has any hardcover Wood Magazine Project books (it's in the RED one, I believe), they've got a simplified version of this in there.

Lastly, a bunch of different plans.  It's in my woodworking links, so here:

www.absolutelyfreeplans.com

Questions, lemme know.  I bought two sheets of ply for this, btw.
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