Main Restorations Software Audio/Jukebox/MP3 Everything Else Buy/Sell/Trade
Project Announcements Monitor/Video GroovyMAME Merit/JVL Touchscreen Meet Up Retail Vendors
Driving & Racing Woodworking Software Support Forums Consoles Project Arcade Reviews
Automated Projects Artwork Frontend Support Forums Pinball Forum Discussion Old Boards
Raspberry Pi & Dev Board controls.dat Linux Miscellaneous Arcade Wiki Discussion Old Archives
Site News

Unread posts | New Replies | Recent posts | Rules | Chatroom | Wiki | File Repository | RSS | Submit news


  

Author Topic: Recreating pixel art  (Read 505 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Smalkmus

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 19
  • Arcade noob! I'm here to learn!
Recreating pixel art
« on: July 03, 2018, 12:18:33 am »
I have what may seem like a silly question. I am a beginner and have next to no idea what I am doing. I’m working on creating some graphics for an arcade cabinet kit. I want the theme to be Mega Man. I noticed whenever I bring images into photoshop and transform them into larger sizes they get pixelated or leave some artifacts behind. I don’t know enough to say exactly why that happens but I think the original images just aren’t good enough quality and by enlarging them their imperfections show up (or something). So I had this idea if I made pixel art in photoshop by zooming in to like 3200% and using the 1 pixel pencil tool and “drawing” the pixels from an image like the one attached, I end up with this tiny image but it can be transformed to a much larger size and doesn’t seem to pixelate or show any artifacts.

So my question as an artistically retarded person, is this something that people do?  Is it crazy?  It takes a good bit of time but I searched all over and couldn’t find good quality sprites that I could blow up without degraded quality. Is there a place where I could find good quality mega man character images?  If not would people be interested in the ones I’ve created?  Is there a place that I should upload them to share with others so they don’t have to go through the same exercise that I am now?

opt2not

  • Trade Count: (+13)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4558
Re: Recreating pixel art
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2018, 12:53:01 am »
Don’t use the transform tool.

Under the Image dropdown menu, select Image size. There are resampling options, choose “Nearest Neighbor”. This will keep all the pixels sharp when scaling them up.

I think the transform tool uses bilinear sampling by default to interpolate the pixels. They will definitely be blurry from that sampling method because it tries to approximate details by averaging pixels.

My bet is your source images are good enough. You just need to use the right scaling method.
Using nearest neighbor on low res sprites should be crisp when you scale them up.

TheGreatRedDragon

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 39
  • I want to build my own arcade controls!
Re: Recreating pixel art
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2018, 01:38:50 am »
Adding on to what opt2not said, for best results scale it by a whole number. Nearest neighbor will keep your colors intact but proportions can get weird.

For example, if you take one pixel, which is a 1x1 square, and you want to make it bigger you can make it a 2x2 square, which will be four pixel, or a 3x3 square, which will be nine pixels, and so on, but you can't make it a 1.5x1.5 square. So if you scale by 200%, 300%, etc. every pixel will be perfectly reproduced whereas if you scale it by say 275% you will get wonkiness as new pixels have to be generated, altering the fidelity of the artwork.

Smalkmus

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 19
  • Arcade noob! I'm here to learn!
Re: Recreating pixel art
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2018, 04:40:30 am »
Thanks, guys.  I appreciate the suggestions!  I'll give that a shot.  I had played with the nearest neighbor option on the transform but I never tried to resize them using the image size menu.  Also, the whole number thing makes perfect sense so I will do that as much as possible and see if that helps avoid the funky artifacts.

JDFan

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 2988
  • I want to build my own arcade controls!
Re: Recreating pixel art
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2018, 06:02:20 am »
One more thing -- When working on the images always save them in a lossless format (ie.  raw, bmp,psd,png) - each time you save in a lossy format like .jpg etc that compresses the image it will introduce compression errors since it worries about file size more than file accuracy and then reopening and making changes and saving again will compound these errors - so always save in a lossless format when possible and use sources that are in a lossless format when sourcing if possible since those formats have not already lost original image data.

Smalkmus

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 19
  • Arcade noob! I'm here to learn!
Re: Recreating pixel art
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2018, 11:49:57 pm »
Thanks, JDFan!  I appreciate the tip!

Malenko

  • KNEEL BEFORE ZODlenko!
  • Trade Count: (+58)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 12907
    • forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php/topic,142404.msg1475162.html
Re: Recreating pixel art
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2018, 08:07:11 am »
I think the transform tool uses bilinear sampling by default to interpolate the pixels.

By default it does, but you can change it to nearest neighbor as well.

PNG is the best balance between lossless and file size (IMO), excluding vector formats of course.
No matter one's station in life, the Dance of Death unites us all.

Smalkmus

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 19
  • Arcade noob! I'm here to learn!
Re: Recreating pixel art
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2018, 08:55:54 am »
I think the transform tool uses bilinear sampling by default to interpolate the pixels.

By default it does, but you can change it to nearest neighbor as well.

PNG is the best balance between lossless and file size (IMO), excluding vector formats of course.
Thanks for the suggestion!  With your guys help, I do see that a good quality PNG will transform well using nearest neighbor and keeping the percentages to multiples of 100. Since dumping any source JPG file, using nearest neighbor and keeping to multiples of 100, my images are looking crisp and clean.

  
 

Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31