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Author Topic: Rebuilding a Curbside Cabinet  (Read 711 times)

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JoeyJTB85Z

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Rebuilding a Curbside Cabinet
« on: June 19, 2018, 11:52:17 pm »
Hey Everyone!
I'm Joe, 28 years old and I'm from New Jersey. I've been fiddling with MAME on my PC for years, but on my way to work last Wednesday I happened upon an arcade cabinet on somebody's front lawn with a "FREE" sign on it. Actually, there were two, identical ones, but I could only fit one in my vehicle.
It's a video poker machine called "Dodge City," made by Merit Industries from the late 80s. I cannot understand why someone would pay to play video poker without a payout, especially considering the machine only has a bill acceptor!
The machine mostly works. A few of the buttons on the control panel are sticky and the bill acceptor is dead, but the monitor is sharp and doesn't have any burn-in.
The cabinet is decent. It needs paint and some repairs to the T-molding. I managed to get it with keys so I didn't need to drill out the locks! The monitor bezel is a piece of plexiglass that is back painted like the backglass on a pinball machine. Making a custom one for however I decide to do it will be a challenge. The control panel is fairly shallow, so I'm not sure what I'll be able to fit on it
I'm undecided on what to do with the monitor. I'd love a real CRT arcade monitor, but it's not as though it's a Wells Gardner or Electrohome: it's just some Chinese thing with no actual brand I can find. I don't know how reliable it will be long term.

Aside from this, I've got three pinball machines at the moment, none of which are at 100%: a 1974 Bally Firecracker, 1978 Stern Lectronamo and 1979 Williams Tri Zone. I also have a thing for most old electronics, including radios, TVs, stereo and HiFi consoles, telephones and computers.


yotsuya

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Re: Rebuilding a Curbside Cabinet
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2018, 02:17:17 am »
If the monitor is sharp and has no burn in, you HAVE to use it...

Failing that, ship it to me! :)
***Build what you dig, bro. Build what you dig.***

JoeyJTB85Z

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Re: Rebuilding a Curbside Cabinet
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2018, 08:28:21 am »
I figured  ;D

Just to be safe, I'll probably replace the electrolytic filter caps to  try and keep it reliable. Anyea as to what the resolution capabilities of the monitor might be, and what kinds of games it would be capable of? Most of what I'd be playing would be 70s to mid 80s. The newest thing I might play would be Outrun. Additionally, while I know this is a raster display, how might it do showing a vector game like Asteroids or Tempest?

Mike A

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Re: Rebuilding a Curbside Cabinet
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2018, 09:17:20 am »
Unless there are problems with the monitor don't cap it. It is a waste of time and you could muck something else up in the process.

  
 

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