Main Restorations Software Audio/Jukebox/MP3 Everything Else Buy/Sell/Trade
Project Announcements Monitor/Video GroovyMAME Merit/JVL Touchscreen Meet Up Retail Vendors
Driving & Racing Woodworking Software Support Forums Consoles Project Arcade Reviews
Automated Projects Artwork Frontend Support Forums Pinball Forum Discussion Old Boards
Raspberry Pi & Dev Board controls.dat Linux Miscellaneous Arcade Wiki Discussion Old Archives
Site News

Unread posts | New Replies | Recent posts | Rules | Chatroom | Wiki | File Repository | RSS | Submit news


  

Author Topic: Toshiba monitor issue  (Read 343 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

acvieluf

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 811
  • I want to build my own arcade controls!
    • forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php/topic,147793.0.html
Toshiba monitor issue
« on: April 07, 2018, 08:53:44 pm »
This question is in regard to the Toshiba monitor in the VIDEO (not the electrohome monitor) that I linked to in this thread: http://forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php/topic,156636

Pictured you'll see the socket and tube pins.  There is some obvious corrosion in it, as evidenced by the rust color.  Here's my newb question:  Was that a tube pin that rusted off?  Or some sort of spark gap (alluded to in a response in the above thread)?  The tube itself was "good," (unless it was a pin, of course), so would a new socket solve my problems? 

Thanks in advance.




buttersoft

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 556
  • Is running at 15kHz
Re: Toshiba monitor issue
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2018, 09:29:13 pm »
It's a tube pin. I think the G3 grid goes in there, normally.

You might be able to bridge it, but that's going to be like 1KV potential.

acvieluf

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 811
  • I want to build my own arcade controls!
    • forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php/topic,147793.0.html
Re: Toshiba monitor issue
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2018, 09:41:15 pm »
It's a tube pin. I think the G3 grid goes in there, normally.

You might be able to bridge it, but that's going to be like 1KV potential.
Thanks for the response, I appreciate it. I had a feeling that that was a pain, but was hoping for something easier, haha.

Yes, I assume bridging it would be quite difficult. I'm a try if there's no other options. Aside from that, should I just start hunting for a new tube?

Sent from my Moto Z2 Play using Tapatalk


buttersoft

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 556
  • Is running at 15kHz
Re: Toshiba monitor issue
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2018, 11:45:21 pm »
A new tube is going to be the easiest thing to do. Do you know how to spec it? If not, go to http://www.jomac.net.au/ and click the two links under the tech stuff heading. And then get the number off your tube and type in into http://tubular.atomized.org/ (heater voltage is pretty important, but the G1 voltage can be compensated for by the chassis, i believe)

This is assuming you can remove the old pin and clean that socket safely. Otherwise you want a whole new monitor = tube + chassis.

princess prin prin

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 68
  • intrinsically safe
Re: Toshiba monitor issue
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2018, 05:51:52 am »
Bridging what? The pin came off completely, it's beyond repair and just to be clear, tube pins are not solderable. And focus voltage is one third of the anode voltage so 8KV for a 19"/20" tube. The socket can't be opened/serviced and needs to be replaced too. Judging by the neckboard the whole chassis calls for a clean-up/restoration before being operated.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2018, 05:54:49 am by princess prin prin »

acvieluf

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 811
  • I want to build my own arcade controls!
    • forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php/topic,147793.0.html
Re: Toshiba monitor issue
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2018, 02:00:07 pm »
A new tube is going to be the easiest thing to do. Do you know how to spec it? If not, go to http://www.jomac.net.au/ and click the two links under the tech stuff heading. And then get the number off your tube and type in into http://tubular.atomized.org/ (heater voltage is pretty important, but the G1 voltage can be compensated for by the chassis, i believe)

This is assuming you can remove the old pin and clean that socket safely. Otherwise you want a whole new monitor = tube + chassis.

Thanks for the info.  I didn't realize that there was a number on the tube, so when i get to my friends next, i'll take a look. 

I could really use some help id'ing this monitor, as the sites in the stickies, and google is not helping.  Attached is a photo of the toshiba sticker, any ideas?  I know that the model number is on the sticker, and that it's a 19" monitor, but I can't find ANY info of toshiba 19" monitors online.  Again, any input is really appreciated.

buttersoft

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 556
  • Is running at 15kHz
Re: Toshiba monitor issue
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2018, 07:55:14 pm »
The number on the sticker in your photo is the model of the tube, and the tube alone. From Atomised you'll note it has a CR-31 neck, which is the 8-pin variety and obvious when you look at it, but it also has a 6.3V heater. To use the same chassis as is, you need a tube that matches those two elements, but also one with the same resistances across the yoke.

The chassis will have a separate model no. on it, and it will be different to the tube number. It might be made by Toshiba as they made both tubes and chassis, or it might not.  And this monitor (combination of tube and chassis) probably had it's own model no. to reflect this combination of tube and chassis. Added to which this may have all been from the '80's, and a lot of this stuff was never written down properly.

Also, the two starting digital of the tube model being 51 might indicate it's a 51cm/20" tube, not a 48cm/19". Are the corners of the screen's visible area nice right angles, where the phosphor stripes end, or curved with the radius of a ten cent coin? If the latter, then it is a 48cm tube.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2018, 02:05:19 am by buttersoft »

princess prin prin

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 68
  • intrinsically safe
Re: Toshiba monitor issue
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2018, 03:55:43 am »
It looks like a Sanwa PW-1545 or a similar model. Screen is 19"/48cm (in Japan it's considered 20"/51cm). Sell it and get a Wells Gardner K7000 (complete monitor not just the chassis as yoke impedances are different).
« Last Edit: April 10, 2018, 03:58:29 am by princess prin prin »

acvieluf

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 811
  • I want to build my own arcade controls!
    • forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php/topic,147793.0.html
Re: Toshiba monitor issue
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2018, 02:44:02 pm »
It looks like a Sanwa PW-1545 or a similar model. Screen is 19"/48cm (in Japan it's considered 20"/51cm). Sell it and get a Wells Gardner K7000 (complete monitor not just the chassis as yoke impedances are different).

Thank you very much, I appreciate it! 

The number on the sticker in your photo is the model of the tube, and the tube alone. From Atomised you'll note it has a CR-31 neck, which is the 8-pin variety and obvious when you look at it, but it also has a 6.3V heater. To use the same chassis as is, you need a tube that matches those two elements, but also one with the same resistances across the yoke.

The chassis will have a separate model no. on it, and it will be different to the tube number. It might be made by Toshiba as they made both tubes and chassis, or it might not.  And this monitor (combination of tube and chassis) probably had it's own model no. to reflect this combination of tube and chassis. Added to which this may have all been from the '80's, and a lot of this stuff was never written down properly.

Also, the two starting digital of the tube model being 51 might indicate it's a 51cm/20" tube, not a 48cm/19". Are the corners of the screen's visible area nice right angles, where the phosphor stripes end, or curved with the radius of a ten cent coin? If the latter, then it is a 48cm tube.

Oh my goodness, thats amazing.  I didn't realize that was the tube, i just assumed it was the monitor number itself.  Thank you guys for the incredibly helpful information.  I'll check out the measurements and look for other model identifiers when i get back there next.  This is unfortunately a slow moving project at the moment.

But thank you!

 :cheers: :cheers:

  
 

Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31