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Author Topic: [Solved] IEC module wiring logic  (Read 3141 times)

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hycday

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[Solved] IEC module wiring logic
« on: August 06, 2014, 04:45:37 am »
Hello everybody,

Still in the build of my arcade bartop cabinet, this time I am looking for a way of having a nice electric outlet at the back of the bartop. I saw many posts on forums and pages, but never a clear explanation of the logic behind it.

I intend to plug the computer, screen, leds, harddisk and everything on one power strip, inside the bartop. Then plug the powerstrip to an outlet, inside the bartop, connect the outlet to an IEC outlet and having only one IEC cable coming out of the bartop, to plug it to the wall.

In that way, I find it more clean, more easy to change, repair and nicer. Here is a little drawing for better understanding :



Sorry it is in french, so "bloc que je desire realiser" means "bloc that I would like to build", "prise mur" is the wall outlet, and "boite de derivation qui contiendra le bloc" is the box that is represented by a red square.

I have everything already, the box, the outlet, the iec module, the cables ....

Only thing, is that I don't know how to wire the IEC module to the outlet.
I read many different posts on forums, saw many images, schema, it is always different and answers barely explain the logic behind it in order to be able to do it with a different configuration.
So here I am, trying to wire my outlet (which again, will be inside the bartop, and looks like that) :



so 2 L, 2 ground, and 2 N

to my IEC module (which will go to the outside), note that it has a LED that lights when on ON






on the last picture, you can notice that the pin at the bottom right is in another color, a bit orange, while the rest are more silver, that on the same side of the switch when on ON

I also have these just in case:



So I found this image with an outlet that look (the back of it) like mine :


the green is the ground, the blue is the N and the brown is the L

however, I dont know if the ON switch is on the same side as mine, so I don't know if the wiring would be the same.....

So I am a bit lost on what to do, and how to be sure I do it correctly, thus I would like to understand the logic (I am noob in electronics but I want to learn).

Thanks for any advice and help !

« Last Edit: August 06, 2014, 03:03:42 pm by hycday »

PL1

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Re: IEC module wiring logic
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2014, 07:47:19 am »
Welcome aboard, Hycday.   ;D

Check out this wiki entry for a schematic of how to wire your power inlet.   :cheers:

 

The only other consideration is if you have chosen the correct fuse for your power inlet. (They usually don't come with a fuse installed.)




Scott
« Last Edit: August 06, 2014, 07:49:26 am by PL1 »

hycday

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Re: IEC module wiring logic
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2014, 07:58:08 am »
thank you PL1

i saw this also, but I am not sure of the following :

the schematic is when the ON is "behind" the 8 (like the second picture you posted, at the left of the front side)?

and the lamp will turn on when the switch is pressed (behind the 8 ), so the bridge to the 7 will go, and the lamp/led will turn on, is that right then ?

last question : so I have a wire from 1 to 6, then daisy chain from 6 to neutral, and I have a wire from 4 to 8, then from 7 to hot, but do I also have a wire from 8 to 7, or is this done 'internally' like from 3 to 5 ?

as for the fuse, I got the small ones, 10A, they fit in it

PL1

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Re: IEC module wiring logic
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2014, 11:58:27 am »
There are many vendors selling this type of power inlet with different types of switches and/or lights. (LED, incandescent, etc.)

That makes it easy to make a mistake trying to provide a wiring answer for the tabs based on the physical description of the switch.

The switch can be installed facing either way, so the easiest way to tell which two terminals are 7 and 8 is to use your multimeter to check for continuity (<2 ohms) when the switch is in the "on" position, and an open when the switch is in the "off" position.

As always, ensure that the IEC cord is NOT plugged in before using your multimeter in Continuity/Ohms mode or you'll fry your meter.

BTW, if you wire it with 7 and 8 reversed, the light will be lit all the time.

Thanks for asking -- I've updated the wiki page to include this additional info.


Scott

hycday

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Re: IEC module wiring logic
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2014, 12:36:50 pm »
Thanks a lot PL1 for these details.

I understand what you meant about the fact that there are no real general rules, and that is exactly why I wanted to understand how to do it and not just follow a wiring schematic.
However, with your picture and explanation I understood the logic, at least part of it.

Just this last part about the 7/8 terminals is left.
I recorded myself with the multimeter, and, with the switch on ON, when I touch the pins 6 and 7, the meter displays numbers, when I touch nothing, or the pins 7 and 8 or the pins 6 and 8, the meter stays on "1    ." :


Therefore, I assume that continuity on my module is on 6 and 7 and not on 7 and 8 ? right ?

So in my case, if I follow your schematic, I must switch 8 and 6 ?
thus, a wire from 1 to 8, then daisy chain from 8 to neutral, and I have a wire from 4 to 6, then from 7 to hot?

and you did not answer the question about the fact of wiring 6 to 7, or is this done 'internally' like from 3 to 5 ? (I am saying 6 to 7 if I stick to the fact of switching 8 and 6, otherwise if I follow your original picture, the question would be 8 to 7)

thanks again !

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Re: IEC module wiring logic
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2014, 01:39:09 pm »
you did not answer the question about the fact of wiring 6 to 7, or is this done 'internally' like from 3 to 5 ?
The connections between 6 and 7 (resistor and lamp) are all inside the switch.

Therefore, I assume that continuity on my module is on 6 and 7 and not on 7 and 8 ? right ?
On your power inlet, the switch is installed backward compared to the pic I posted.

Change "6  7  8" on the picture to "8  7  6" and it will match the schematic.   :cheers:

The first two terminals that you touched in the video are 8 (red lead) and 7. (black lead)

I'm not sure if the higher-than-expected resistance (6.2 Ohms) is the result of damaged leads, a poor connection or something else.

Touch the leads together to see how much of that 6.2 Ohms is from the leads and how much is from the switch.

You want a low-resistance connection to avoid generating heat like this.



This is why you always want clean, corrosion-free, mechanically-solid and low-resistance (<2 ohms) power connections.


Scott
EDIT: Updated wiki again with further info and a link back to this thread so people can see the video of you doing the multimeter test.   :cheers:
« Last Edit: August 06, 2014, 02:03:23 pm by PL1 »

yotsuya

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Re: IEC module wiring logic
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2014, 01:44:17 pm »
I got those same IEC connectors recently. I had been getting the ones with 4 pins on the rocker, and all was kosher, but this last batch of 3 I got had only 3 pins on the rocker. I noticed one pin is brass-colored, the other silver. Is it safe to assume the silver ones are for hot, and the brass one for neutral?
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hycday

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Re: IEC module wiring logic
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2014, 01:52:48 pm »
yeahhh I had it right :D thanks to you !

ok, so now I have the logic, I need to have the correct and undamaged tool haha !

I tried it again, and :

- if I touch the red and black leads together, the screen still displays "1   ."
- if I put the point of the leads at the center of the terminals (8 and 7), the screen display "1.4" and stays fixed.

therefore I assume it is correct, no worries to have, this was just a quick and bad mesure I did in the video. right ?
(I bought this on ebay, from china, doesnt look high quality, but doesnt look ---smurfy--- either, just plastic)



@yotsuya : I would advise to test it as I did on PL1 suggestion, however, should you need to know, on my configuration, the bottom right one is brass-colored, all other are silver, and on the front face, the "I" (on) is on same side as the brass-colored one.

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Re: IEC module wiring logic
« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2014, 02:05:08 pm »



This is why you always want clean, corrosion-free, mechanically-solid and low-resistance (<2 ohms) power connections.

I have had absolutely no issues or heat generated since replacing the IEC inlet and using a brand new 14 gauge cable.
It's my firm belief that the issue was caused by using an old PC power cable of unknown age and internal condition.
The connectors inside were probably either corroded or loose.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2014, 02:07:09 pm by BadMouth »

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Re: IEC module wiring logic
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2014, 02:16:47 pm »
I got those same IEC connectors recently. I had been getting the ones with 4 pins on the rocker, and all was kosher, but this last batch of 3 I got had only 3 pins on the rocker. I noticed one pin is brass-colored, the other silver. Is it safe to assume the silver ones are for hot, and the brass one for neutral?
I never assume anything when there are so many different switches that can be installed.

Just do the multimeter test like the video above to see if it's installed "6 7 8" or "8 7 6".   ;D
(Video shows the switch installed in the "8 7 6" direction)


Scott

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Re: IEC module wiring logic
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2014, 02:33:33 pm »
- if I touch the red and black leads together, the screen still displays "1   ."
If you are touching the metal parts of the leads together, this doesn't make sense unless the "1      ." (indicating an "open" on your meter) is changing to a "      1.0" (indicating a short) or your leads are intermittent. (broken/frayed wires, bad connection, etc.)  :dizzy:

- if I put the point of the leads at the center of the terminals (8 and 7), the screen display "1.4" and stays fixed.

therefore I assume it is correct, no worries to have, this was just a quick and bad mesure I did in the video. right ?
Correct.  That reading indicates that the switch is good.


Scott

hycday

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Re: IEC module wiring logic
« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2014, 03:00:40 pm »
ok, I wired everything, it looks like this (note that I have a double terminal on the 6, picture of them in my first post)



I crossed my fingers, pluged a lamp, and switched to ON

the led switch turned on and the lamp too ! :D

\o/ it works !!

gotta say that I was a bit scared of burning everything or getting electrified haha !
I know hope that it wont later, but I guess that if it works now, it should stay like that (talking about the wiring, not external parameters like the cables used etc)

Thanks a lot again !
« Last Edit: August 06, 2014, 03:02:58 pm by hycday »