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Author Topic: How should I power on my DC-based cabinet? Here's how I did it.  (Read 1107 times)

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ZTylerDurden717

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How should I power on my DC-based cabinet? Here's how I did it.
« on: January 02, 2024, 06:31:30 pm »
My cabinet has the following electricity suckers:
Dreamcast
USB-LEDs for marquee
USB Exhaust fan
Basic amp for 2 stereo speakers
Dell LCD Monitor

I went with a practical approach and plugged in all the above to a power strip.  The power strip goes to the wall with an I/O adapter.  I keep the power strip "on" and the I/O adapter flips the cab on/off.

It works, but my brain tells me it should be be regulated through a power supply.  At the same time, this is relatively low power stuff that shouldn't go BOOM considering the DC has its own PSU.

Is this ok or a fire hazard?  If not a fire hazard, is there a more elegant approach that doesn't require intermediate knowledge building power supplies from scratch?
« Last Edit: January 02, 2024, 06:35:08 pm by ZTylerDurden717 »

Brookso

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Re: How should I power on my DC-based cabinet? Here's how I did it.
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2024, 01:29:58 am »
IMO it's not nearly enough devices plugged in to worry about it short circuting, any pics of the setup? Might be able to figure out a better setup when we see it :D
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Zebidee

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Re: How should I power on my DC-based cabinet? Here's how I did it.
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2024, 07:11:56 am »
Every one of those devices should have a power rating in watts printed on them, usually near the power inlet. Add up all the watts.

If a label only lists volts and amps: watts = volts * amps.

Most generic power boards are rated to 2400W, but check label on back. If your total number of watts is even getting close to that rating, then be concerned. However, what you listed does not look like enough to worry about.

What is an "I/O adapter"?
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ZTylerDurden717

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Re: How should I power on my DC-based cabinet? Here's how I did it.
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2024, 08:57:46 am »
What is an "I/O adapter"?

It's just an on/off switch you plug into the outlet.  I flip this on, and the whole cab goes on.


I'll provide pics when I get access to the cab.  In the meantime, really appreciate the advice.

Zebidee

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Re: How should I power on my DC-based cabinet? Here's how I did it.
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2024, 09:53:56 am »
Ah thanks! I see.

I'm Australian and over there, almost all wall power points come with switches as standard. However I see switches are much less common in other countries.

If you aren't afraid of some minor hacking, I like to install one of these bad boys in the back of my cabs. Search for "IEC320 PC power socket male". That way, when moving the cab or whatever, I never have to worry about a dangling power cord. There are many varieties, but I like the ones that have an LED in the switch and a fuse (you may need to buy the fuse separately).
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ZTylerDurden717

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Re: How should I power on my DC-based cabinet? Here's how I did it.
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2024, 10:22:33 am »

If you aren't afraid of some minor hacking, I like to install one of these bad boys in the back of my cabs. Search for "IEC320 PC power socket male". That way, when moving the cab or whatever, I never have to worry about a dangling power cord. There are many varieties, but I like the ones that have an LED in the switch and a fuse (you may need to buy the fuse separately).

This is excellent.  It's just as practical and can insert a fuse that solves my concern.  And yeah, you're right, I do get inconvenienced with the dangling "tail" power cord moving it around.

Where do you drill the hole in your cab for placement? The back or bottom?
« Last Edit: January 05, 2024, 10:32:48 am by ZTylerDurden717 »

Zebidee

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Re: How should I power on my DC-based cabinet? Here's how I did it.
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2024, 12:20:59 pm »
This is excellent.  It's just as practical and can insert a fuse that solves my concern.  And yeah, you're right, I do get inconvenienced with the dangling "tail" power cord moving it around.

Where do you drill the hole in your cab for placement? The back or bottom?


Back, a few inches up from cab's floor and in from side. Wherever is most convenient for you, yet gives enough wiggle room to access the terminals from inside.

If you want to push the cab right up against a wall, right-angle cords/adapters are cheaply available to suit.
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