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Author Topic: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response  (Read 39858 times)

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fjl

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I and other people seem to hate the clicky sound and feel of the Cherry microswitches. The other option besides microswitches are leaf switches. Leaf Switches are known throughout the arcade world as having no "click" and for some players, they have a quicker and better response time. This is debateable depending on which arcade enthusiast you ask. Some preffer the soft feel of leaf switches and some preffer the click of microswitches since a click lets you know the button is pressed while a leaf switch has no sound indication that the contacts on the button are currently touching. I myself have never tried leaf switches but I do believe that they should have a better response since it doesn't work like a spring.

Microswitches have no springs either but they work in a way where a bent strip of metal constantly has tension put on it. So its kind of like a spring. At the end of the metal strip is an arm with a two sided metal contact, kind of like a two sided hammer. When the button is pressed on the microswitch, it moves the arm in the opposite direction of the tensioned metal strip. When pressed far down enough the tension is released in the opposite direction causing a hammer action on the contact end which is part of the click sound and feel to the microswitch. When the button is released the tension is returned and the arm "hammers" back into its original position. This is why you hear a click when pressing and releasing a microswitch. And I believe that the time it takes for the arm to return/click back to its original position can hinder its performance for certain games.

And if you are anything like me, you'd find this rather annoying. So I came up with a solution to remove the click and feel of the Cherry brand microswitches. I'm not here to say this will in fact improve the performance of the microswitches, make them as good as leaf switches or anything like that. But personally I feel that it does improve the feel and response of the buttons. Plus it removes the annoying clicking sound which I hate. Don't quote me on any of this. I suggest you try my method, test it out and base an opinion for yourself. Best part is that this method doesn't involve damaging the microswitches in any way so if you don't like the new feel then it's easy to return the microswitches to their original clicky selfs.

There are some VERY IMPORTANT things to take note of before deciding to do any of this.

First off, the microswitches are small sensitive mechanisms. When dissasembled there are many small parts that can easily get lost, missplaced, bent and damaged. So be sure to have a good clean and ample workplace. If you do not have good eyesight and dexterity then I would not recommend trying this out. Also If certain parts are removed from the casing, it will be very difficult to re-insert them back in correctly like the metal strip with tension. I had a hard time earlier today when I accidentally pulled out the moving parts. Took me like half an hour to put them back in properly. I will not be asking you to remove anything from the microswitch except the cover which can usually be safe to remove but you must still take caution since certain parts can get stuck to the cover. The last thing to take note of is that by choosing to use this method, you will no longer be able to use the "Normally Closed" contacts. So if your control panel uses them, then this will not work for you. I have only tried this with the Cherry brand microswitches which usually come with Happ Controls buttons. I have not tried this on the Zippy brand microswitches. It's possible to implement this on other type of microswitches but the process can be different. Others have tried. View some of the replies on this thread that others have given on modifying different microswitches.

The process of this mod simply involves inserting paper strips into the moving parts. The type of paper used makes a difference since some paper is different in thickness. For this I used white printing paper bought from Staples. This is actually quite easy to do and I don't claim to be some kind of genius to have figured this out since it's nothing grand.

Well enough babling, here is how to change the feeling and sound of your Cherry Microswitches. Sorry for some of the blurry pictures. I tried to take non blurry pictures but its usually hard to do with such small parts and a crappy camera.


Picture 1.
This is a picture of a regular Cherry Brand microswitch in its complete form. The NC is the "Normally Closed" contact while the NO is the "Normally Opened" contact. Remember that the NC will no longer be usable when doing this.


Picture 2.
This is a picture of the microswitch with the cover removed. It is actually quite easy to remove the cover with your fingernails or a small flat screw driver. The contacts usually stick to the cover so be sure to hold them in place or push them back down while removing the cover. Make sure your Cherry Microswitch contains all the same parts. If it doesn't then maybe its not a cherry switch and I recommend you do not continue. The letter A is where the metal strip with tension is located. B indicates the arm that moves up and down and C is the two sided contact that touches the NC and NO contacts. It's the part that hammers up and down and causes the "click" sound. D is the red pushable button on the microswitch. Its the only moving part that is exposed to the outside of the microswitch case.



Picture 3.
These are the small strips of paper you will use to detain and hold the moving arm "B" from hammering the contacts and making the clicky sound. Cut them to about the same size. They don't have to be exact but at least close to it. "1" will be the first paper strip and "2" will be the second paper strip.

*EDIT* BYOAC member Tiger-Heli was nice enough to create some templates to print out for some of the various microswitches. You can download it here And these are his notes;

Templates attached - Word and PDF formats.
Each square is 0.5x0.625 inches with center-line on fold.  Each sheet modifies 180 switches. I found that the squares folded to 0.25x0.625 work well for Step 1 for all three types the D4 series of switches with coil springs only.  (For these switches, you want to ensure the paper stays below the "lip" on the cover assembly for the microswitch).  For the Cherry Happ K-series switches, you want 0.4x0.625 folded to 0.2x0.625 or single sheets of 0.2x0.625 - Templates added for these, more below. Happy modding!!!




Picture 4.
Fold strip "1" in half. Be sure to fold and press down on it completely so that the bend doesn't cause the paper strip to open up or widen at the fold. Press down on it with your fingernails. Fold Strip "2" three ways as shown on the picture. DO NOT press down on the folds. It needs to be be able to push back. So just fold it slightly like on the picture.



Picture 5.
This is a representation of where we will stick the folded strip "1" paper. As you can see, it is between the NC contact point and the arms "B" contact point. This is why the NC will no longer be usable. The paper strip you see is standing up. We do no want it standing up and sticking out like it is. But this is just a representation of where it will be put and not its final place. It's better to press the button to move the arm down while inserting the paper strip.


Picture 6.
This has the paper "1" strip fully inserted. It's blurry so its hard to see but I slightly highlighted the paper in green. Note that I pushed the strip into the small groove/opening where "G" is located. That is very important. So insert it so it looks exactly like on the picture.


Picture 7.
Wow, a non blurry pic. This is a representation of where the strip "2" paper that was folded three times will be inserted. It's in front of the tip of the arm but this time it's not between any of the contacts.


Picture 8.
This is a picture with strip "2" inserted. Note that that the folds are slightly opened. This is to give it play so what when the arm pushes toward the folded paper, the paper will push back. I also pointed out where strip "1" is located. Note that both Strip 2 and 1 are pushed into that small square groove "G." Strip "2" must fit snugly inside groove "G" and touch the SIDE of the arm's contact not block the front of it.


Picture 9.
Here is another picture with both strips fully inserted. Once again note how both strips go into groove "G" and how strip 2 rests on the SIDE of the arms contact. The arm's contact is represented with "T."


Picture 10.
The gap between the Normally Open(NO) contact and the arm's contact "T" is also noticeable on picture 9 This gap is VERY important. You must have a gap! After adding strip "1" if you noticed that there is no gap, then you need to reduce the thickness of strip "1" by pressing down again on the paper after folding it or using thinner paper. You can also try using different thickness paper for strip "1" to reduce or increase the gap to your liking. Remember that the smaller the gap, the better response you can receive when pressing the button. Just don't make it too small because its possible that the gap will close and short itself after reinserting the microswitch cover.


This is where I test that everything came out right. Press on the microswitch button and see that all the moving parts work and that you no longer get a clicking sound. If anything seems iffy, then re-cut and redo the paper strips again. Remember that the point of this is to make the arm be able to move but not hammer down and make the loud clicking sound. If done right, the clicking will completely go away. In some vain attempts, the clicking will get reduced but will still be slightly noticeable. If so, try again because you did not do it right. This will most likely take a few tries before you get it right. It's possible that you'll find that there is no gap between contacts. Or that there is a gap but when pressed, the contacts don't touch. Also that the contacts only make contact when the button is pressed really hard or that it only makes contact for a split second after releasing the button. I'd had all these phenomenons happen to me while testing this out. So be sure to check for all these things before continuing. This is the tedious part.

On picture 11 & 12, I found that all the moving parts where good so I connected my multimeter and tested the microswitch. It all works! No more clicking sound and better response. At least I think so.



Next you'll need to put the microswitch cover back on and retest it again with your multimeter. It's likely that something moved out of place and no longer works like it did when the cover was off. I used my Fluke meter which has a really fast continuity test. It will beep continuously for whenever the contacts are making contact.

I did this for all of my microswitches and feel a better and quicker response. I notice that a regular Happs Button will click or make contact half way before the button reaches its stop zone. This is still the same, you just no longer get the annoying click.

So let me know what you think!  ;D
« Last Edit: November 04, 2007, 12:40:31 pm by efjayel »

fjl

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2007, 07:13:33 am »
reserved

Added link to Tiger-Helis small paper strips templates.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2007, 12:46:10 pm by efjayel »

Havok

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2007, 07:43:20 am »
Interesting modification. I would like to see how that holds up over time, however...

ratzz

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2007, 08:18:44 am »
Interesting modification. I would like to see how that holds up over time, however...

I must say, that was my initial thought.

These components are tested for 100's of thousands of presses. I used to work in a factory that had a dedicated machine to test a component it used in its product, and it ran all day and all night without stopping with a counter attached.

I would have assumed that these microswitches have gone through the same rigorous process, but the modification has not.

I too would like to see if this mod works some way down the line, but it's extremely interesting and a good writeup.

Anyone fancy building a hydraulic 'finger pressing' testing machine?  ;)

Ratzz  :cheers:

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2007, 09:14:52 am »
This is good stuff (and a great write-up).  Even if it doesn't hold up over time this at least lays the ground work for someone like Randy to manufacture/modify these switches in a more permanent/durable manner.  I'm amazed at how many people keep pushing this hobby forward.   :applaud:

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2007, 09:18:52 am »
Very neat mod! If I had to venture a guess, I'd say this is alot like GGG's new microleafs.

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2007, 10:02:51 am »
The idea behind this is great.  The only problem is the second piece of paper that acts as the spring.  Replacing that with some plastic and adding some super glue to ensure the paper doesn't shift would really help out.  Good work  :applaud:
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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2007, 12:25:44 pm »
Neat mod.  Very clever.  As for durability, there is no way the paper will last forever.  but for home use it could be years.  Strip "1" could be replaced with any thin non conductive material...plastic, wood(lol oh like paper) tape, glue, whatever.  Strip "2" Hmmm, How does the switch work without it.  I'm not convinced that paper will retain any springlike qualities for long...but as mentioned earlier in the thread plastic might work.

Lastly...while I think this is ingenious...I'm much too lazy to do this to a CP full of switches.  I don't mind the click anyhow. >:D

RandyT

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2007, 12:31:43 pm »
If I had to venture a guess, I'd say this is alot like GGG's new microleafs.


Interesting mod, but I just wanted to note that this has nothing in common with the Micro-Leafô Product.  The switches are completely different internally, and they are not modded like this.

RandyT
« Last Edit: October 17, 2007, 01:33:42 pm by RandyT »

rooterman

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2007, 12:41:30 pm »
That seems like a lot of work and tweaking, and I'm not sure the paper would last that long. Imagine doing this to all of your switches, it would take forever.

rm

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2007, 01:37:00 pm »
We have a range of plastic shimming (stainless too) that would probaly be more robust. It comes in a wide range of thicknesses from 0.001" up to 0.030", one of which im sure would be ideal.

fjl

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2007, 01:43:09 pm »
Thanks guys. Took me a few hours to write all this up so it makes the effort worth it.

This is not meant as some kind of permanent solution that will last forever. I should have mentioned that this is just something I was fooling around with to make the click go away. Even though I first tried it with paper, I did try some other things like electrical tape and different materials. But some of them only made it harder to do so I just stuck with paper for the walkthrough.

You can try it without strip "2" but then you will be getting a slight clicking sound when releasing the button. The same if you remove strip 1 but not strip 2 except the click will be when you press instead of release.

Yeah, it does seem like a lot of work. Especially the first time trying it out, but I suggest you try it just one one button. If you like it, you can keep doing the rest. Besides after you do it the first time, you will already know what you are doing and you should be faster at it.

And Randy is right, these are not leafswitches nor some kind of replacement for them. If you want the true leaf switch experience then I suggest you buy some from Ponyboy or Randy. This is just a small mod to remove the incessant clicking.


But anyways, has anyone tried this yet? What did you think?
« Last Edit: October 17, 2007, 01:50:48 pm by efjayel »

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2007, 02:32:27 pm »
But anyways, has anyone tried this yet? What did you think?
Tried with a Honeywell switch that I had laying around - only used the #1 strip, though, not the #2.  Also just cut up a post-it note, not a thick piece of paper like you recommended.

Clicking was at least 50% less and would likely be inaudible in a panel.  Seemed to be more responsive as well.

Probably worth doing it right.

Thanks for documenting this!!!

A no-cost improvement is always a great thing!!!!
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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #13 on: October 17, 2007, 02:37:35 pm »
I wonder how well a thin strip of plastic like from blister packaging would work for strip #1. It would last longer.

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #14 on: October 17, 2007, 03:19:13 pm »
I wonder how well a thin strip of plastic like from blister packaging would work for strip #1. It would last longer.
I was wondering that as well, or transparency film.
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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2007, 03:55:18 pm »
Sure, try different things. If you find something that works better then please share.

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #16 on: October 17, 2007, 04:11:24 pm »
You better mark this date on the calendar

Good job Efjayel.  :applaud: Usually you're irking me about something ... but not today.  ;D

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2007, 04:35:23 pm »
Another option might be to buy low force microswitches. I saw a page from a guy who went crazy about his keyboard and mouse switches, but I guess his endgoal was the same (ie low force and just enough "click" to keep some feel in the switch: mykeyboard.co.uk/microswitches/

He advices the Saia-Burgess G3 M1 low force microswitches which require only 15g to activate them. Internally they look like leaf switches almost  :P Another option he mentions is microswitches with levers  :angel:
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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2007, 04:43:29 pm »
Sure, try different things. If you find something that works better then please share.
Did some experimenting - tried both a piece of card stock and a business card and found both to be too thick.  The card would invariably slide out of place and cause the switch to short out.

However, I got very good results - 50% less click and more responsive - using a single piece of 20 lb paper cut to 3/16" x 11/16" in place of strip 1 - not folded and without a strip 2.

This will ride in the curved section of Arm B above and will bow a bit at the top (where the piece that becomes the COM contact meets the top of the switch, but doesn't seem to affect anything.

I'm anxious to see other people's take on alternative solutions as well though, so keep the ideas coming.
It's not what you take when you leave this world behind you, it's what you leave behind you when you go. - R. Travis.
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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2007, 04:44:46 pm »
Another option he mentions is microswitches with levers  :angel:
I think that's referred to as a Micro-LeafTM switch.   :laugh2: :laugh2: :laugh2:
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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2007, 04:46:57 pm »
BTW - can a mod move this to the main board instead of Arcade Misc - it belongs there AFAI'm concerned.
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When all is said and done, generally much more is SAID than DONE.

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #21 on: October 17, 2007, 05:12:11 pm »
Does anyone have the Cherry D42X microswitches? I only have D42Y version. The X ones should be a lot lighter too (.15N instead of .75N) I would guess they would make a lot less sound too.

Personally I never cared so much about the clicking, but I hate the force it takes to activate them. The Cherry microswitches I have are just too hard to press. If I didn't press exactly at the right spot on the pushbutton it would tilt the button plunger and touch down on the other side without even activating the switch at all. I went with leaf switches now, but still, it would be nice if I could put my old pushbuttons to use in some other projects.



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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #22 on: October 18, 2007, 06:24:56 am »
No joy!!!

My Honeywell switches look and work similar to your and I think the mod might help.

MY Cherry switches are a different story.  First off, the case consists of four parts - the base, the cover and two plastic pins - there is no way to remove the cover without shearing the heads off the pins - not that it matters as the cover will stay on without them and the switch body will hold it in place anyway.

However, the guts of the switch are totally different as well - instead of a torsion spring built into the arm, mine had a tiny coil spring with a pre-load in extension on it - this gave a positive snap action to the switch and no piece of paper was going to quiet this.

Looks like I might be in the market for some micro-leafís after all - although the clicking really isnít audible to me beneath the panel anyways.
It's not what you take when you leave this world behind you, it's what you leave behind you when you go. - R. Travis.
When all is said and done, generally much more is SAID than DONE.

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #23 on: October 23, 2007, 04:34:25 pm »
just buy soft-touch microswitches. People don't seem to realize there are a variety of cherry switches out there, with differing levels of "resistance" on how hard you need to push on it, and the resulting "click" sound is proportionally more intense.  Get the softest ones... one inside a closed control panel you won't really feel or hear them.
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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #24 on: October 24, 2007, 11:52:57 am »
My $0.02

The buttons I ordered some time ago (translucents from LizardLick) came with cherry switches.  I find them very easy to open, and easy to apply this mod to.

I tried just a small unfolded bit of paper for #1; this removed a fair bit of the click, minor change in feel and response, and seems to be holding up under moderate usage.

Added folded bit for #2, clicking gone, softer feel, more responsive overall.

So I think I'll apply this mod to all my buttons - it's really easy and quite cheap.  If the paper keeps coming loose, then maybe it's time to buy some other switches, but for now...

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #25 on: October 24, 2007, 12:26:25 pm »
Finally, some feedback!

Thanks. Let me know how it holds up. I haven't built my cab yet so I need to see how it lasts over time from some good usage.

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #26 on: October 24, 2007, 03:49:14 pm »
Switch I took apart looked like this:

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #27 on: October 24, 2007, 04:56:58 pm »
From the specs I checked, my Cherry switches are like that too. I didn't feel like breaking them to find out for sure though.
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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #28 on: October 25, 2007, 01:55:43 am »
Nice drawing. Spring loaded huh?  :dunno

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #29 on: October 25, 2007, 06:38:01 am »
Nice drawing. Spring loaded huh?  :dunno
Yup - I didn't draw that though, I just stole it from Cherry's website. 8)
It's not what you take when you leave this world behind you, it's what you leave behind you when you go. - R. Travis.
When all is said and done, generally much more is SAID than DONE.

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #30 on: October 25, 2007, 10:14:29 am »
BTW in the specs for the Cherry D4 series microswitches, they show a low vs standard force configuration by moving (and changing)  the spring. This results in 15g or 75g activation force.
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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #31 on: October 25, 2007, 11:59:39 am »
BTW in the specs for the Cherry D4 series microswitches, they show a low vs standard force configuration by moving (and changing)  the spring. This results in 15g or 75g activation force.
My switches appear to be configured as the "Light force" version and they click more loudly than the Honeywell version that efjayel was trying to improve on.

It's not a huge concern to me, but anyway...
It's not what you take when you leave this world behind you, it's what you leave behind you when you go. - R. Travis.
When all is said and done, generally much more is SAID than DONE.

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #32 on: October 25, 2007, 12:08:29 pm »
BTW in the specs for the Cherry D4 series microswitches, they show a low vs standard force configuration by moving (and changing)  the spring. This results in 15g or 75g activation force.

It looks like there is also another structure added to connect the spring to in the lighter version.

This discussion illustrates a point I made in a different discussion.  These things are not created equal by a long shot and their outward appearance has little to do with what is inside or how they perform.

I'd like to bring up something else that might be useful in the context of this discussion.  "Snap" switches are an improvement over leaf switches in one very important respect.  That "snap" action makes a very fast, very positive closure of the contacts.  Undesirable switch "bounce" is virtually eliminated by this action.  So while minimizing the throw of the lever can be seen as desirable, preventing the "click" entirely is not necessarily a good thing.  And while one can mod a switch to quiet it down, the resistance provided by the switch isn't going to change much as it is a function of the spring arrangement used in that model.

FWIW.

RandyT
« Last Edit: October 25, 2007, 12:10:54 pm by RandyT »

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #33 on: October 25, 2007, 04:55:12 pm »
thing about the snap that I don't like is that it has to "snap" back into position so the buton can be used again. This mod prevents that "snap" back and allows it to work a little more like leaf switches in that after feeling it out, its easier to figure out the throw distance of the button and not have to allow the button to move back(snap) into its complete upward position to press it again.

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #34 on: October 25, 2007, 07:08:20 pm »
thing about the snap that I don't like is that it has to "snap" back into position so the buton can be used again. This mod prevents that "snap" back and allows it to work a little more like leaf switches in that after feeling it out, its easier to figure out the throw distance of the button and not have to allow the button to move back(snap) into its complete upward position to press it again.

I understand.  But one very important difference between the mechanics of a leaf switch and the mechanics of a "snap" switch that has been modified not to "snap" is that, unlike with the leaf switch, pressure cannot be brought to bear directly on the contacts of the modified snap switch.  The mechanism used for interference could result in unreliable contact closure.

RandyT

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #35 on: October 25, 2007, 07:22:45 pm »
This discussion illustrates a point I made in a different discussion.  These things are not created equal by a long shot and their outward appearance has little to do with what is inside or how they perform.
The design might look slightly different, but does it really matter if it uses a spring or a bent piece of metal under tension?
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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #36 on: October 25, 2007, 07:29:19 pm »
The design might look slightly different, but does it really matter if it uses a spring or a bent piece of metal under tension?

Absolutely.

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #37 on: October 25, 2007, 07:39:40 pm »
The design might look slightly different, but does it really matter if it uses a spring or a bent piece of metal under tension?

Absolutely.

I don't really notice a difference though.
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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #38 on: October 26, 2007, 06:43:03 am »
The design might look slightly different, but does it really matter if it uses a spring or a bent piece of metal under tension?

Absolutely.

I don't really notice a difference though.
I do.

The Honeywell switches (bent piece of metal) have a moderate actuation force and a mild clicking which was easily 80% defeated by the single strip of paper inserted in Step 1 (even without the folded strip).

The Cherry switches (spring) have a very slightly stronger actuation force, but a comparatively loud clicking and a very positive "snap" (almost a hammer motion), in either the on or off position.  It hits hard enough that there is no way a piece of paper will diminish it on the NC contact (sponge rubber, maybe, or maybe removing the contact altogether), and even if you did, you still have a distinct click when it hammers the NO contact which would be tough to avoid.

Tear them apart and try to do something about the noise and you might change your opinion!!!!
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When all is said and done, generally much more is SAID than DONE.

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Re: Removing The Click From Cherry MicroSwitches And Get Better Response
« Reply #39 on: October 26, 2007, 07:31:13 am »
You claim the Cherry switches (with spring) have a higher actuation force. That's obviously wrong. The low force version needs an operating force of 15g which is about the lowest you can get. The one I have is rated at 75g and I measured it (crudely I must admit) to be around 80g.

My point was that it's not just the spring vs bent metal. It's the whole design.

I actually did take my Cherry D42Y switch apart and the noise almost disappears when I put some paper in there. You must have done something wrong when you tried. The trick is to destroy the snap action and I don't see why it wouldn't work on any other type of snap action switch.

Personally I don't really care about the sound, but I do agree that the switch works better without the "snap action". One problem I have with microswitches is that when I fire quickly sometimes the switch misses a press because of the long throw (especially the snap back). With the paper inserted this is much less of an issue.

I'd be more interested in lowering the operating force. The lowest force switches I have now are the Ultimarc T-Stick low force switches. These are actually "Micro-Leafs" and it takes between 20g and 25g to operate them. Wonder how much the leaf switches are, but they feel very light.

Another problem I have with microswitch pushbuttons is the problem they have with the uneven load. You get resistance only on one side. This means the plunger will be pushed into the side and sometimes it will not even activate the switch when the other side runs into the stop. The centered plunger tip of the leaf button is better there too.

:edit: Measured a leaf switch and it needs 100g to operate it. That's including the switch spring though. The whole microswitch pusbutton assembly (with Cherry D42Y) needs 140g
« Last Edit: October 26, 2007, 08:02:52 am by patrickl »
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