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Mame Compiler 64 v2.0.197

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headkaze:
Mame Compiler 64 Homepage

Note that v1.18 is for compiling MAME 0.136u1+. For earlier versions you must use v1.17. For instructions and downloads please visit the website above.

MKChamp:
Nice little app. Hopefully, this will please the people that would have benefited from the *cough* binary *cough*.

I added the white box/decoding/decrypting/updating/etc. removal to the hicore diff. There's a new one posted as hi_119u2, it actually can be used in place of the hi_117u3 (for versions 117u3 - present) but was generated and only tested with 119u2.

headkaze:

--- Quote from: MKChamp on September 30, 2007, 01:34:33 am ---Nice little app. Hopefully, this will please the people that would have benefited from the *cough* binary *cough*.

I added the white box/decoding/decrypting/updating/etc. removal to the hicore diff. There's a new one posted as hi_119u2, it actually can be used in place of the hi_117u3 (for versions 117u3 - present) but was generated and only tested with 119u2.

--- End quote ---

The hi_119.diff included in the Mame Compiler archive had to get created manually. I tried applying hi_117u3.diff to 119 then adding the disclaimer skips manually. It produced a really strange diff file. So I went through modifying it manually using the hi_117u3.diff in a text editor. The resulting diff looked right this time (20 KB instead of 100 KB +).

I also had to add a -w switch to diff for removing whitespace. So the command I was using is


--- Code: ---diff -w -r -c -N old src >hi_119.diff
--- End code ---

Not sure why I had to add that switch while you didn't. Are you using the Unix version of diff or something?

MKChamp:
The reason the diff that it created was so huge was because when a patch is applied to a version that had 'little' changes here and there from the version the diff was created from (117u3) what it does is create a "~" copy of the file it patched. So, then when you diff the new source, it sees new files (the ~ ones) and creates them in the diff. Since those files aren't called in the make file, they don't affect the compile.

headkaze:

--- Quote from: MKChamp on September 30, 2007, 02:00:18 am ---The reason the diff that it created was so huge was because when a patch is applied to a version that had 'little' changes here and there from the version the diff was created from (117u3) what it does is create a "~" copy of the file it patched. So, then when you diff the new source, it sees new files (the ~ ones) and creates them in the diff. Since those files aren't called in the make file, they don't affect the compile.
--- End quote ---

Ahhh okay, I getcha, mystery solved then!

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