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what wood to choose?

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zaphod:
Laminate the interior pieces (front, top and back) before assembly.  You can then laminate the two sides after assembly by laying it  on its side.

bionicbadger:

--- Quote from: rchadd on April 22, 2004, 11:03:58 am ---lighter MDF...

Woodn't (sic) that be called LDF (Low Density Fiberboard)? :)

MDF = Medium Density Fibreboard

think i'll have to visit a proper supplier - my local Homebase doesn't have any choice.


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Take look here : http://www.windsorplywood.com/graphics/pdf_files/sheetgood1.pdf
See they have a super lite MDF.

If you are going to laminate, then just buy some melamine, its pre-laminated(but its heavy) and comes in different colors if your supplier carries it.

DrewKaree:
Seeing your questions and noticing your admission of lack of experience with this stuff, buy yourself an EXTRA piece of whatever you use (MDF or Ply, IMO plywood will be better for you, lighter weight, just as strong as MDF, easier to machine, less dust).

DO NOT laminate your pieces before assembly.  If you do this, and you are not SPOT-ON-PERFECT with everything, what are you gonna do?  You will not be able to remove the laminate without screwing up your hard work.

When purchasing your laminate, also purchase the cheapest piece of laminate they offer (ask them for it, it'll prolly be some hideous color/pattern they hardly sell or some solid color they get cheap) and use this with the extra piece of material to practice on.  Laminating is not hard to do if you've got the right tools and READ THE DIRECTIONS, but practice will be your best friend.  I K-N-O-W you will be wanting to not waste time and get to building your cab, but practice will pay off in your final results.  

You can do it some other way, of course.  I would consider it foolishness for someone without experience to do this without practicing it first.  I will probably elicit all sorts of "I did it without doing that, and it worked fine" posts, but if those people were honest, they'll also tell of the area they did that "you can't really see it, I'm the only one who knows it's there".  NO ONE does it perfectly the first time.  There's a reason people pay good money to have countertops installed.  I'm just happy I get a chunk of that money.  

 8)

SNAAAKE:

--- Quote from: hyiu on April 22, 2004, 11:11:23 am ---if you're going to laminate it... then don't use MDF...

you can actually use some cheaper plywood....

because if you laminate, you don't really care if the wood surface is nice or not.... the laminate will cover it anyway...

go get some cheap plywood... which means the surface is rougher... not as good as oak and stuff.... and before applying the laminate... just lightly sand it with like 60-100 grid... so that they're reasonably flat... but no need to be very smooth....



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Wrong.

Do use MDF if you laminate.It cost about the same as ply anyway.The cheap long grain ply is like $20 a sheet and so is MDF.And laminate sticks MUCH better on MDF.I did laminte plywood before.Wasnt happy at all.The surface was rough even with sanding.The laminte started coming off after like a month.
Why bother sanding when you can get smooth MDF for the same price.
(thats my local home depot)


hyiu:
Since I most likely have less experience with laminate than snaaake....

plz take my words with a grain of salt... and at your own risk..... :P :P :P



--- Quote from: SNAAAKE on April 23, 2004, 02:36:02 am ---
Wrong.

Do use MDF if you laminate.It cost about the same as ply anyway.The cheap long grain ply is like $20 a sheet and so is MDF.And laminate sticks MUCH better on MDF.I did laminte plywood before.Wasnt happy at all.The surface was rough even with sanding.The laminte started coming off after like a month.
Why bother sanding when you can get smooth MDF for the same price.
(thats my local home depot)




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