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Author Topic: Hoping for a neato idea.  (Read 1764 times)

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Zakk

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Hoping for a neato idea.
« on: June 14, 2024, 01:39:50 am »
So finally got around to completely restoring my 20+ year old cabinet. Almost everything except the marquee light and the control interface board had failed. PC, monitor, and of course the at-the-time NOS wico grommets.

So replaced everything, re-taught myself how it all works, and bob's yer uncle. But since I was renovating the basement, and I had some beefy 5" beams looking for a use, I built it a little cubby. With the 9 foot ceilings, it leaves a fair bit of space over the cab. So wondering if anyone has any ideas what might look cool in there. The basement is being redone with a 70's/80's "ski chalet motif" since it's in a log house in the mountains (and the basement had been done in drywall and drop ceilings). My thought had been to suspend a fully lit model of the Enterprise A... but I also considered a lit shelf which might showcase some rare games/consoles. I don't really just want to hang a lighted beer sign or something (I've got those elsewhere), but just keep staring at it and thinking something really cool could go there. I'd put a lit star destroyer, but with the current state of star wars (and star trek isn't much better to be honest), I thought maybe even one of the new TOS enterprise models...

Anyone have a better idea for this spot? I can build anything, but coming up with the ideas is meh. I also don't want to use AI when I have access to this wonderful pool of retro nostalgia minds. Area is 35"W 23"H and 25" D.

It's funny, the cabinet is massive, but building a TALL enclosure makes it look kind of tiny.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2024, 01:42:11 am by Zakk »
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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2024, 11:59:32 am »
I'm in the shallow end of the pool it seems.  8)

No matter! I think I've arrived at a solution. I plan to box out the area with another piece of 5x5. I'll then line the inside with acrylic smoked mirror. I'll install a hook in the center at the top, then I can hang/display almost anything in there. I think the first item will be a hypercube, which honestly should look pretty kickass, like a 21st century disco ball. Then I can rotate in a lighted 1/350 enterprise, and maybe even a space 1999 eagle (loved the look of those ships as a kid). it also leaves the option of adding in say a lighted "nintendo" sign or something like that in there, just to keep it fresh.

I also think a very slow motor to turn the cube would be in order. Since there will be a power cord, maybe an arduino control so that it only rotates so far before reversing, would also allow me to adjust the speed I think.
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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2024, 04:52:55 pm »
I also think a very slow motor to turn the cube would be in order. Since there will be a power cord, maybe an arduino control so that it only rotates so far before reversing, would also allow me to adjust the speed I think.
An inexpensive 28BYJ-48 might work for small models, but it isn't very powerful.
- Near the bottom of that post, there's a link to an Arduino sketch to do back-and-forth rotation with that motor.

If you need more power, a NEMA 17 stepper motor (commonly used in 3d printers) would be a good choice for this application.
https://forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php/topic,161063.0.html

Since the motor will be rotating slowly, an A4988 driver is probably quiet enough.
- If the motor is too noisy, upgrade to a TMC2130 V1.1 that has the same basic pinout as the A4988. (handy for swapping it on a breadboard while testing)

To power the motor and Arduino, you will need 5v, 12v, and ground.
- You can get them from either an arcade-style power supply or a Molex in your computer.
- The DPST is a power switch for the 5v and 12v.  Ground is always connected.
- On the 5v input to the Arduino, use a 10uF electrolytic capacitor for filtering.
- On the 12v input to the driver, use a 100uF electrolytic capacitor for filtering.

The stepper motor connects to breadboard j24 thru j28.

For your setup, you might not need the limit switches on breadboard b5 and b6, but they would be a very good way to avoid getting the power cable for the hypercube all twisted up.
- To make it bulletproof, you can use hall-effect sensors for the main limit switches and add an emergency microswitch limit switch in case the motor is too close to the hall-effect switch when power is applied.  The reverse only triggers on the high/low transition.  If the magnet starts too close to the switch, it will be below logic high so it won't reverse.  I have an updated sketch with the emergency switch feature if you're interested.

To do the back-and-forth motion without limit switches, you'll need to modify the Arduino sketch from the other thread.
- In the main program loop, you can use one for/next loop to go x steps in one direction, then a second for/next loop to go in the other direction.




Scott
« Last Edit: June 15, 2024, 05:40:57 pm by PL1 »

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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2024, 11:32:42 am »
Oh that's cool. I'm trying to figure out the size/weight right now. I'm trying to figure out if the 15" or the 10" cube would look better in the space. I don't know how well the cube will project onto the surrounding mirror, or if I'll have to also add supplemental lighting, but that should just be trial and error. I got the cross beam installed today, I'm going to build a mockup of 'the cube' to see if the 15" is too big for the space, or if the 10" is too small. I'll fabricate a solid hanging system, likely out of tube steel, so that I can hang pretty much anything in there. Mirror panels already ordered. I think it could look really neat. Thanks for the tips, I'll check out going exactly that route since almost all items will have to have powered lighting of some sort.


**edit. I stepped it up a bit. Now on 3 sides I planned to put in mirror sheets, with the cube being in the center, but hey, why not take advantage of the space behind the mirrors in the enclosure....

I think if I make infinity mirrors in the 3 walls surrounding the infinity mirror cube (which is essentially what it is), I can probably either make it +infinity neat, or just make it a real mess that overloads the senses. I'll likely start with directional mirror acrylic on the 3 sides, then MAYBE add in mirror panels and RGB leds behind it, and maybe even do the top of the enclosure, depending on how neat the effect is... Also from the mockup looks like the 10" cube will actually have a better effect than the 15", which has a point-to-point radius of 25" which is pretty much the entire space. The $ savings on teh smaller cube can go to the extra lighting and the controller....
« Last Edit: June 16, 2024, 02:20:28 pm by Zakk »
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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2024, 05:07:58 pm »
almost all items will have to have powered lighting of some sort.
Then you'll definitely want the version with an emergency switch.



Before you connect the stepper motor to the driver, you need to adjust Vref so the driver provides enough current to move the motor but not so much that it damages it.
- This "MechDriverAdjustment" sketch will work with either the A4988 or TMC2130 driver. (TMC2130 reads Vref from a different location)

Code: [Select]
// Adjustment sketch for A4988 driver board installed on stepper motor mech control board.

/*
Sketch sets direction and step pins to constant high so you have time to adjust Vref on the driver.

1. Without stepper motor attached, adjust Vref. (Initial safe setting)
  - Read voltage off metal top of potentiometer on driver.

2. Power off.

3. Attach stepper motor with jumpers, multimeter set to amps in series with coil 1.

4. Power on.

5. Adjust Vref to control current output of driver. (Final accurate setting)
*/

// Adapted from https://dronebotworkshop.com/stepper-motor-hall-effect/

// Define connections
#define DIR       8   // Arduino pin that connects to A4988 driver board DIR pin.
#define STEP      9   // Arduino pin that connects to A4988 driver board STEP pin.

void setup() {

  // Setup the stepper controller pins as Outputs and set the pins to HIGH
  pinMode(DIR,OUTPUT);
  pinMode(STEP,OUTPUT);
 
  digitalWrite(DIR,HIGH);
  digitalWrite(STEP,HIGH);
 
}
 
void loop() {

}

Once you have Vref properly adjusted, load this "MechHallSwitchesInterrupt" sketch on an Arduino Pro Micro.
- You'll need to greatly increase the variable "pd" from 180 to 4000(?) on line 22 to slow it way down.

*** Test your setup to ensure that the variables on lines 23 and 26 that control the first direction of travel and the limit switch direction changes are correct. The emergency switch must be in the first direction of travel. ***

Code: [Select]
// Stepper motor mechanism controlled by an Arduino Pro Micro, a stepper motor driver board, two Hall Effect directional limit switches, and an emergency reverse microswitch.

// Stepper motor goes one direction until it triggers one Hall Effect switch and goes the other direction until it triggers the other Hall Effect switch and goes the original direction again.

// The emergency reverse switch is there in case power is shut off when the magnet is too close to the Hall Effect sensor on the first travel direction end.
// When power is reapplied, the voltage on that input starts below logic HIGH so the Arduino doesn't see a falling transition from HIGH to LOW.

// *** Test your setup to ensure that the variables on lines 23 and 26 that control the first direction of travel and the limit switch direction changes are correct. ***

// Adapted from https://dronebotworkshop.com/stepper-motor-hall-effect/


// Define connections
#define SWITCH_A  2            // Arduino pin that connects to the limit switch closest to the stepper motor.
#define SWITCH_B  3            // Arduino pin that connects to the limit switch farthest from the stepper motor.
#define SWITCH_E  7            // Arduino pin that connects to the emergency reverse switch.
#define DIR       8            // Arduino pin that connects to the stepper driver board DIR pin.
#define STEP      9            // Arduino pin that connects to the stepper driver board STEP pin.


// Variables
int pd = 180;                  // Pulse duration period in microseconds.  Minimum value is 180 for TMC2130 in Halfstep, 85 in Qtrstep, 45? in 16 μsteps.
boolean setdir = HIGH;         // Set first travel direction to HIGH or LOW. *** Verify that the first travel direction is correct for your setup. ***
boolean emergswdir = !setdir;  // Set emergency reverse switch direction to opposite of setdir.

boolean nearswdir = HIGH;      // Set near switch new direction to either HIGH or LOW. *** Verify that the direction changes triggered by the limit switches are correct for your setup. ***
boolean farswdir = !nearswdir; // Set far switch new direction to opposite of nearswdir.

// Near limit switch interrupt handler.
void limit_a (){
  setdir = nearswdir; // Change motor travel direction.
    delayMicroseconds(pd);
  Serial.println("Go away from the motor"); // Print direction and carriage return.
} // End near limit switch interrupt handler.


// Far limit switch interrupt handler.
void limit_b (){
  setdir = farswdir; // Change motor travel direction.
  Serial.println("Go toward the motor"); // Print direction and carriage return.
} // End far limit switch interrupt handler.


// Emergency reverse switch interrupt handler.
void limit_e (){
  setdir = emergswdir; // Change motor travel direction.
  Serial.println("Emergency reverse"); // Print direction and carriage return.
} // End emergency reverse switch interrupt handler.


void setup() { // Start program setup.

// Set the stepper controller pins as outputs.
pinMode(DIR,OUTPUT);
pinMode(STEP,OUTPUT);

// Set the switches as inputs.  Use INPUT_PULLUP for an internal pullup resistor.  Use INPUT if your Arduino requires an external pullup resistor.
pinMode(SWITCH_A, INPUT);
pinMode(SWITCH_B, INPUT);
pinMode(SWITCH_E, INPUT_PULLUP);

// Attach interrupt pins to handlers.
attachInterrupt(digitalPinToInterrupt(SWITCH_A), limit_a, FALLING);
attachInterrupt(digitalPinToInterrupt(SWITCH_B), limit_b, FALLING);
attachInterrupt(digitalPinToInterrupt(SWITCH_E), limit_e, FALLING);

} // End program setup.


void loop() { // Main program loop.

    // Turn the motor one step in the current direction.
    digitalWrite(DIR,setdir);
    digitalWrite(STEP,HIGH);
    delayMicroseconds(pd);
    digitalWrite(STEP,LOW);
    delayMicroseconds(pd);
    // Print step, direction (0 or 1), and carriage return.
    Serial.print("Step ");
    Serial.println(setdir);

} // End main program loop.


Scott

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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2024, 11:26:54 am »
Going to peruse the part for the spin/light control today. I have a couple of motors from a failed drone-repair, but no idea if they have any kind of non-zero-drag startup power, although I'm quite sure they work with variable power, so could be that they get a jolt to start turning then scale down the voltage...

I did a fair bit of arduino experimentation when I built a custom alarm system for my gun vault a few years ago, I -think- I have a box full of switches, sensors, breadboards and a million led's somewhere, but I will have to grab another arduino and I'll pick up some of those gikfun boards as well.

Definitely nice not to have to figure out the programming... I seem to recall that was the longest part of my last build, getting the nuances of the programming. I made a TOS star trek panel that actuated not only a relay for the lights, but one for an electro magnetic lock for the door, AND a backup power supply in case of power outage. You had to punch in a sequence after the motion sensor was triggered, or a blaring siren went off. Best $20 alarm system I ever had... it even ran banks of LEDS which lit the guns, and monitored the heat on the LED heatsinks, dimmed them if they got hot, etc. I remember getting ALL that done and debugged (took weeks to get everything done) and the first arduino board (can't recall which gen) burned out, but the newer revision I replaced it with ran for years until I sold that house (presumably still working...)

Appreciate you just laying everything out though, should make it much quicker. I am quite sure now that I'm going the arduino route that I will incorporate a lot more "stuff" to the build, I mean, why only use it for spinning a cube? :)

Ahh rabbit holes...I remember thee.
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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2024, 03:51:19 pm »
I have a couple of motors from a failed drone-repair
Drone motor . . . as in a motor that spins a propeller fast enough to generate lift?   :dizzy:

The code only works with a stepper motor.

You can find lots of NEMA 17 stepper motors on Amazon for under $10.  This one is $7.65 and has a 5% coupon.
https://www.amazon.com/Nema17-Stepper-Stable-Reinforced-Sealed/dp/B0CZ4LV37B/?th=1

I'll pick up some of those gikfun boards as well.
Here are some less expensive ones to consider.
https://www.amazon.com/ElectroCookie-Solderable-Breadboard-Electronics-Gold-Plated/dp/B07ZYNWJ1S/?th=1
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09WZY8H3X/?th=1


Scott

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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2024, 05:06:36 pm »
I have a couple of motors from a failed drone-repair
Drone motor . . . as in a motor that spins a propeller fast enough to generate lift?   :dizzy:

The code only works with a stepper motor.

You can find lots of NEMA 17 stepper motors on Amazon for under $10.  This one is $7.65 and has a 5% coupon.
https://www.amazon.com/Nema17-Stepper-Stable-Reinforced-Sealed/dp/B0CZ4LV37B/?th=1
I would assume that these drone motors are speed controllable AND would have fairly good torque ratings?? My concern is the overall weight that I'm spinning around, not sure if a $2 stepper motor would be up to the task. I mean worst case I can just build some gearing into the mount for speed reduction, but torque is the big variable. The cube itself is 6lbs, plus whatever handing device and gearing/mount. Overcoming the initial inertia of startup is more what I was thinking about here. Maybe I should take a look at just a beefier stepper motor.


Quote from: PL1
I'll pick up some of those gikfun boards as well.
Here are some less expensive ones to consider.
https://www.amazon.com/ElectroCookie-Solderable-Breadboard-Electronics-Gold-Plated/dp/B07ZYNWJ1S/?th=1
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09WZY8H3X/?th=1


Scott

Those should work. Amazon is REAL sketchy about deliveries out where I'm at, but I can usually get things routed to the post office in town...

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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2024, 11:12:45 pm »
I would assume that these drone motors are speed controllable AND would have fairly good torque ratings??
They run at variable but high speed in one direction -- they aren't designed to reverse.

The torque rating will actually be lower because of the high rotation speed.
- Picture trying to get a car to move from a dead stop using only 4th gear.  You'll stall the engine every time.
- For those who don't drive stick, your automatic transmission probably goes R N D 2 L. L = low gear = more torque.

My concern is the overall weight that I'm spinning around, not sure if a $2 stepper motor would be up to the task.
As I said earlier, a $2 28BYJ-48 might work with a light plastic model, but definitely will not work for what you're doing.



I mean worst case I can just build some gearing into the mount for speed reduction, but torque is the big variable. The cube itself is 6lbs, plus whatever handing device and gearing/mount.
Building a gear box for a drone motor for this application is 100% GUARANTEED fail.

Overcoming the initial inertia of startup is more what I was thinking about here. Maybe I should take a look at just a beefier stepper motor.
The Mostly Printed CNC (MPCNC) uses 76 OZ/in NEMA 17 motors.



NEMA 17 is the mount-hole pattern size, not the torque rating, so you can easily change to another NEMA 17 motor with more torque  if this 84OZ/in one isn't strong enough. (Didn't expect you'd need to turn a 6 pound assembly.)
https://www.amazon.com/STEPPERONLINE-Stepper-Bipolar-Connector-compatible/dp/B00PNEQKC0/
- Worst case, you might need to move up to a more expensive NEMA23 motor and driver.

You should be able to rotate a 6 pound mass if you get a properly rated motor (not sure exactly how much torque you'd need   :dunno) and design the rotation mech correctly.

Consider using something like a 2" lazy susan bearing (smaller is better) . . .



. . . the bottom would be attached to the shelf and the cube would be mounted on a hollow tube (red) passing through the center of the bearing (blue) and attached to the top plate of the bearing.

LED wiring goes through the tube.

A metal arch (gray) from one corner of the top of the bearing to the opposite corner connects the top to the stepper motor. (green)
- The arch transmits the torque from the motor to the cube.


Scott

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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2024, 11:41:19 am »
Hmm, very good, never thought about the reverse, and yeah, I just grabbed a 5lb weight and started really trying to figure out how easily it is to start it turning. A fair bit...

Acrylic tubing was what I was going with. The place that sold the mirrors also sold acrylic tubes, so I added in a 6' length of 2" ID tubing. My thought was to hide both the power wire and the hanging wire inside that, and glue the gearing to the tube (which would hopefully also reduce swing/sway in the setup). I want the tube to be as inconspicuous as possible, I should be able to just grind it to fit the corner contours. I'm hoping that 2" will be sufficient, but I can always order something different if not. Cube is on the way, no idea about the mirrors. Shipping is ALWAYS an issue out here, smaller shipping companies just "lose" packages.

I'll just hunt for a stepper motor that will work no questions. Cost is not an issue, I just wanted to use what I have on hand, since those little motors were $$$ and didn't work as advertised. I'll get something industrial where I can see the operating parameters.

Lazy susan might work. It would give me something to hold the tubing, probably just cross bolt across the top of it, attach the gearing, and bob's yer uncle.

Thanks for the help, I would very likely have been muddling at these bits for weeks trying to get it right...
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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2024, 04:49:06 pm »
I'll just hunt for a stepper motor that will work no questions. Cost is not an issue, I just wanted to use what I have on hand, since those little motors were $$$ and didn't work as advertised. I'll get something industrial where I can see the operating parameters.
In that case, move up to a NEMA 23 motor and driver.   ;D

You can use a combination of the AccelStepper library, the bounce sketch demonstrated at the end of the first video, and my sketch for the limit and emergency switches.





Lazy susan might work. It would give me something to hold the tubing, probably just cross bolt across the top of it, attach the gearing, and bob's yer uncle.
The other thing that you'll need is a way to mount the magnets for the Hall-effect sensors and a tab (green) to hit the emergency reverse microswitch (red) -- didn't show those in the earlier diagram.

The larger the rotation radius of the tab for the emergency switch and mounting the magnets, the closer you can get to 360 degrees of rotation. (blue)


Scott

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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2024, 08:51:19 am »
You might be able to get away with not using the Hall-effect sensors and take advantage of the acceleration control available in the AccelStepper library.

In the main program loop, have the motor go X steps CW then X steps CCW.

In the interrupt code for the emergency switch, have the motor stop then go X + Y steps CCW.
- The Y value gives you room so when the main program loop resumes you won't hit the emergency switch again until the next time you power the system on.

Will a sudden stop triggered by the interrupt cause any damage to the mech?
- If so, Hall-effect limit sensors may have enough range to allow for a safe rapid deceleration, but you'll still want to keep an emergency microswitch.

Pretty sure the command that you need for relative motion of the motor is move().


Scott

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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #12 on: June 19, 2024, 02:59:48 pm »
I gotta be honest, I was straight up just going to use 2 microswitches. I have some that are silent, pretty simple to send a reverse signal that way I would think, just register a keypress.
I'm also toying with using a controller I have here, I used it to run an entire reef tank, so I'm familiar with the coding and sensors. There's a simple breakout box that accepts simple analogue signals AND I have a multitude of controllable 120 outlets. I can wire in a dedicated 20A line to the controller, and then I can run a fairly heavy load. I'm thinking about controlling more than just that disco ball. In fact, what hit my brain was adding a motion sensor, active during certain hours, which would cold-start everything in the room, the lights on the bar, the arcade machine, the pinball and maybe even an ice machine. During the winter it would fire up the electric fireplace.  The controller is just sitting here (since you just can't have a reef aquarium in the forest), so it's wasting away, and I was hesitant to sell it if I can find a use for it. MUCH more expensive than an arduino, but I already have it.

chrome-extension://efaidnbmnnnibpcajpcglclefindmkaj/https://help.neptunesystems.com/downloads/docs/APEX_manual.pdf

It's actually fairly impressive what that thing can do right out of the box.
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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2024, 10:28:44 pm »
I was straight up just going to use 2 microswitches.
It seems like a regular microswitch could take quite a beating, especially if you aren't using AccelStepper to decelerate the motor before impact.   :scared

Another option to consider:  Do you have any proximity or beam-break optical sensors?

Something like these Adafruit 2167 3mm beam break sensors would be great.



I'm also toying with using a controller I have here, I used it to run an entire reef tank, so I'm familiar with the coding and sensors. There's a simple breakout box that accepts simple analogue signals AND I have a multitude of controllable 120 outlets.
Sounds interesting.

Hope you can get that controller to play nice with a NEMA23 driver/motor and your 6 lb. disco cube.   :cheers:


Scott

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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #14 on: June 20, 2024, 02:28:02 am »
I think it will have to be tested. I'm thinking at such a slow speed, impact would be negligible, although I might 3d print some bumper stops in flexible pla...
Trying to just keep it as simple as possible. I did order one of those drives though, seems like a good little motor. I'll likely start with printed gearing, but if need be, I'll get gears either routed out of something solid, OR have the cad files cnc'd. Again, trying to keep it simple. The less pieces, the less to go wrong sort of thing.

Until I get the motor, and build a mockup I really don't know what problems I'm going to have. I haven't found a nice bearing yet either, I'm thinking a proper roller bearing, perhaps even a packed one, would be less rickety than a lazy susan roller. The smoother the bearing, the less likely I'll have issues with the gearing. Again, until I can muck about with that motor, I won't know what I have to work with. I have about 5" of working space for the apparatus. That motor I believ is under 3" so that is perfect.

Compounding things, I'm also levelling a backyard, and cutting a road into the mountain to make a beach down by the creek. It's crazy that I seem to have less time now than I did when I worked full time :)
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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #15 on: June 20, 2024, 07:17:54 am »
I'll likely start with printed gearing, but if need be, I'll get gears either routed out of something solid, OR have the cad files cnc'd. Again, trying to keep it simple. The less pieces, the less to go wrong sort of thing.
I wouldn't trust anything 3d printed to transmit torque to your 6 lb. cube.

A direct drive setup will be more simple than a gear box.

See if you can find a flange shaft coupler for your motor's shaft.

Maybe fabricate something like this:
- Flattened oval plate 1/4"(?) thick plate or thinner with bent edges for rigidity?
- D-shaped hole for the motor shaft or attach the flange shaft coupler.
- Two holes (green) to attach the cube.
- Semi-circular slot for the wiring.
- The edge of the plate can hit the limit switch. (red) Narrow down this end of the oval to reduce weight and allow more range of rotation.



I haven't found a nice bearing yet either, I'm thinking a proper roller bearing, perhaps even a packed one, would be less rickety than a lazy susan roller.
A roller bearing like a trackball/skateboard bearing is designed for the load to be perpendicular to the axis of rotation.
- That could work if you're going to put a bearing on each end of the bolt through the top of the tube that you described earlier.
- The height of the bearing might be a problem, given the limited clearance.

You may want a bearing like a lazy suzan that is designed for the load to be parallel to the axis of rotation.

Pretty sure the search term you're looking for is "thrust bearing".  You'll probably want to get one with washers.
- Bonus: These are much more stable and thinner than a lazy suzan bearing. (3mm and 5/64" for the two linked below)

https://www.amazon.com/XIKE-TC3244-Thrust-Bearings-Washers/dp/B0CYZMZ15V/

https://www.amazon.com/uxcell-AXK5578-Bearings-Diameter-Thickness/dp/B07GC7VWMM/?th=1




Scott
EDIT: Updated plate image to include slot for wiring.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2024, 09:48:47 am by PL1 »

JudgeRob

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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #16 on: June 22, 2024, 11:15:15 pm »
Hey dude, that project sounds nice! 

Why don't you just use a servo motor?  There are plenty of 360 degree ones, they have a built-in gear box for torque and with the explosion of hobby robotics, there are some really beefy ones that should have plenty of power.  And programming the movement speeds and direction would be super simple. 

Good luck, can't wait to see how it turns out!

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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #17 on: June 23, 2024, 05:27:17 am »
Why don't you just use a servo motor?  There are plenty of 360 degree ones, they have a built-in gear box for torque and with the explosion of hobby robotics, there are some really beefy ones that should have plenty of power.  And programming the movement speeds and direction would be super simple. 
Thanks for the rabbit hole.   :P   :lol

A servo sounds like an interesting option.

Pros:
- Don't need limit switches.
- Wide variety of inexpensive high-torque models.
- You can get ~2"/50mm dual-arm 25-tooth aluminum servo horns since plastic ones won't handle the torque.
  -- Dual-arm allows you to apply even force to both sides of the tube for smoother rotation and provides room for the wiring.
  -- If you want to get closer to 360 degrees of rotation, you might need to use a single arm horn or a right angle horn.
   

Cons:
- Some servos are noisy.
- Some only provide 1/2 the torque they are supposed to be rated for.
- There might be a problem with sudden motion when initializing the servo position of a standard 3-wire servo.
  -- Looks like you can avoid that by using a feedback servo motor like this one or this one.




Scott
« Last Edit: June 23, 2024, 05:37:55 am by PL1 »

Zakk

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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #18 on: June 24, 2024, 12:12:02 am »
I'm sort of just waiting for this cube thing to arrive. I'll admit that I am a bit concerned that it really will look like an updated disco ball, so kind of just going to set it in place and see, do from there.
I worked with that space this weekend, made a shelf for it, and think I do want it to be flexible use. For example if people are coming over (and honestly...we're 20 miles from even the smallest town, but hey you never know), I want to be able to put a monitor up there, either twin the arcade screen OR twin the main screen, which usually has sports of some sort on it. I'm thinking a monitor in an enclosure that just slides in there and plugs in. So that got me thinking that I look at the space as a cartridge based receptacle.  Sort of be able to just swap out components. I don't want to get bored with a cube, if that makes sense. We'll see this week. 

That said, the servo motor does seem to make more sense. I watch enough battlebots I should have thought of that.

Really enjoying playing that machine again though, that's for sure. Putting it in its own space was totally the right call.
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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #19 on: June 25, 2024, 05:50:33 pm »
Cross member is in, shelf is in, and monitor set in place for now.
I am digging the swappable use idea. It would be neat to be able to put say a Christmas scene in there at Christmas, TV for hockey season, maybe even do the whole cube thing in a swappable box. That would make it easier to tweak/repair.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2024, 06:44:06 pm by Zakk »
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Re: Hoping for a neato idea.
« Reply #20 on: June 26, 2024, 09:45:17 pm »
Cube showed up, not sure what's going on with all my acrylic mirror, they still haven't charged the credit card and no shipping #.

Anywho, it's an awfully neat little cube. Lots of options and settings, but just not sure how much effort I want to put into it, totally not sold that I'm going to like the final effect.

Put it this way, I have a dance club worth of lasers, lights, smoke and overpowered speakers in my garage. Almost any of them are more impressive overall than the cube. Don't get me wrong, it's one of the best looking light boxes I've ever seen, right up there with some of the fiber optic beer signs I have kicking around, but you kind of do have to be fairly up close to appreciate what is going on with it, and 9 feet in the air may not cut it. Not sure. I'll have to put a hook and try it in place in the next couple of days here, but honestly I think the twinned monitor is a more eye-catching effect, since it shows what the players are seeing on the screen. I can't help but think the response to it would be "but what else does it do?

Effect wise, the cube is pretty wild. It's sound and/or bluetooth controlled, I haven't even scratched the surface with the options, but it's basically a disco lamp.  I'll have for hang it, set it to sound activated mode, and have a few games of smash tv or something...
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