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Author Topic: is glue necessary  (Read 981 times)

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AlienInferno

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is glue necessary
« on: May 19, 2022, 09:45:26 pm »
I need to rebuild my OG mame machine to fit through a smaller than normal width door in my house for what is my game room.  Normally I prefer to glue all my joints on my cabs.  With either screws, nails, clamps, etc.  I was thinking I could make it so I can piece it together in place sans glue.  This will allow me the full size cab I want/need for the monitor I'm using.  I'm thinking about glueing blocks onto the side pieces and just screw the middle pieces (speaker panel, coin panel, etc) to the side pieces to complete the build.  My only worry is stability and whether it will fall apart after a while.

I know that companies sell kits that go together like ikea furniture not to mention that ikea has been putting furniture together this way for years but I'm wondering if anyone has done this themselves.  Maybe with some links or helpful tips.

vertexguy

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Re: is glue necessary
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2022, 11:17:34 pm »
Several builds on here have used threaded inserts.  Mines not finished but I have a fair amount of lessons learned documented with photos on them in my build thread. 

http://forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php/topic,161694.0.html


Also check out bperkins lakeside arcade build for a completed example.

http://forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php/topic,156272.0.html

« Last Edit: May 19, 2022, 11:21:45 pm by vertexguy »

RandyT

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Re: is glue necessary
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2022, 10:43:28 am »
My suggestion is to start initially with furniture bolts and inserts as long as the structure design is sound.  You can always decide to glue it later if you start to have a problem, albeit with more work rebuilding it.

But I'll also state that glue is definitely recommended for an arcade cabinet.  Yes, bolt-up furniture is a thing, but unless you are talking about the more costly stuff, usually made with hardwoods, glue is still recommended when assembling anything you want to be sturdy.  Unlike an Ikea bookshelf, arcade machines can take a beating and over time some of those joints can loosen and start to fail.  Putting a heavy monitor topside will amplify some of those stresses and would really need to be taken into account when designing the structure.

As with anything, the method of construction should be engineered based on the shape and size of the structure, the weight it must support and what it is intended to endure.  The correct answer is really something only you can provide, unless you can offer some detailed dimensions, component weights, the type of material and whether you tend to be use it aggressively or are a more conservative player.  All of these things come into play when deciding the best build approach.

But if you do decide to go with furniture hardware, selecting the correct ones for the job will go a long way in keeping it sturdy.  The best ones have a large diameter with pockets drilled or milled perpendicular to the joint.  The large diameter provides more surface area, which reduces the amount of material compression, thereby keeping the joint tighter for longer.  But this type of hardware tends to be more costly and really requires a CNC machine to install easily.     

Xiaou2

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Re: is glue necessary
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2022, 10:51:55 am »
Coarse thread screws, are insanely strong.

 But even more to consider... is that the sum total strength, is also based on the entire structure,
which enforces each others strength and stability.

 Then there is the depth of the screws, and the type of Joints you use.
If you tried to screw a small screw into the center of a 1/2" board... its easy to understand that such a
joint could easily split the wood with even the mildest of pressure.

 As such, smart joinery is key.   You can glue railing strips of wood inside the cabinet for allowing deeper screw
depths... as well as to allow certain parts to rest on these wide-area "railings".  You screw the parts to the railings.
And you can add strength to the railing, screwing them to the cabinet.

 Personally, I always screw things together, without any glue.  This allows me to easily take anything apart,
at any time... for any reason.  Ive re-used wood / parts often,  as well as have re-used all of the screws.
Ive never had any issues with strength, or things coming apart.

 Look at any Deck, or house framing... and realize that there is no glue on either of them.


 EDIT:  Basically speaking... if you are concerned about the strength and longevity.. then "over-build" a
thicker and beefier inner skeleton framework.

 Furniture type of hardare will never hold up to serious stresses.  They are not designed for that kind of thing.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2022, 10:57:04 am by Xiaou2 »

RandyT

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Re: is glue necessary
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2022, 12:58:42 pm »
Coarse thread screws, are insanely strong.

Anything screwed into wood can tear out.   A deck is not a cabinet, and unless it is fully framed with 2x4s, you won't be using screws with nearly as much length/surface area.

The right kind of "furniture hardware" is the key.  If it can hold up to being used on a "marital bed", it'll hold up on an arcade cabinet ;)  But framing is always an option if one doesn't mind the extra weight, which is actually beneficial in an arcade cabinet.

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Re: is glue necessary
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2022, 09:03:08 pm »
I never glue my cabinets and I think many of them are just about bomb proof.   The method I've finally settled on is to put 2x2s in the corners of joints to use as a surface to screw into... works great.   Gluing does add a lot of strength, but it becomes a pain if you want to change something or repair a damaged area.

MartyKong

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Re: is glue necessary
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2022, 12:56:55 pm »
Assuming your happy with your original OG Mame build (and don't plan on moving anytime soon) an alternative might be to widen the door entrance. My brother purchased a 80 inch monster TV set for movie night back in the day and widening the doorway was the answer. A bit of drywall, frame remove/replace was all it took. Of course, If your looking to update your cab that works too. Just another idea ;)

Zebidee

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Re: is glue necessary
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2022, 04:57:33 pm »
I avoid using glue if possible. With plywood, blocking pieces (1 generally use 1"x1") and appropriate screws you don't need glue.

However, if you use MDF (or a nailgun), then I'd suggest glue with the blocking pieces. Use a quality PVA-based wood glue like Titebond II, as it is easy to use and water cleanup (comes off hands easily), non-toxic, good for great many applications, dries reasonably fast, and is sandable. If the piece isn't screwed in, use a clamp and some scrap wood (or put something heavy on it) to keep the joins together while it dries.

Selley's Aquadhere is a common Australian brand/variant.

I also use Titebond (or other PVA wood glue) to strengthen or fill any dodgy parts of low-quality or splitting plywood. Use a clamp while it dries. Titebond is also good for sealing edges to keep moisture out, like someone suggested earlier.
Check out my completed projects!


AlienInferno

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Re: is glue necessary
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2022, 06:19:17 pm »
I never glue my cabinets and I think many of them are just about bomb proof.   The method I've finally settled on is to put 2x2s in the corners of joints to use as a surface to screw into... works great.   Gluing does add a lot of strength, but it becomes a pain if you want to change something or repair a damaged area.

This is what I was planning on doing.  Technically it's how I built my first one except I glued and screwed the blocks in. 

Assuming your happy with your original OG Mame build (and don't plan on moving anytime soon) an alternative might be to widen the door entrance. My brother purchased a 80 inch monster TV set for movie night back in the day and widening the doorway was the answer. A bit of drywall, frame remove/replace was all it took. Of course, If your looking to update your cab that works too. Just another idea ;)

I removed the door and frame to fit a Area 51.  Now if I wanted to widen the door farther then that I would have to move wall studs and some of the kitchen cabinetry as my arcade room is technically a dining room off the kitchen.