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Author Topic: Workshop slippers?  (Read 5449 times)

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BadMouth

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Workshop slippers?
« on: November 03, 2021, 05:31:44 pm »
Having a basement workshop, I often slip down there for quick tasks or sometimes the quick task turns into hours.  After tracking sawdust upstairs too often, I had to leave a dedicated pair of slippers in the workshop.  Also had my painting flip flops as a backup.

Well, I tossed out the slippers when the level of aluminum chips tangled in the fuzzy liners became too scratchy.  Wouldn't you know it, three weeks later one of the cheap flip flops fell apart.

On the lookout for some new shop slippers.  Must be able to scoot my feet into them without using hands.  Anyone have any recommendations? 

I saw some crocs on sale and thought that the smooth surface would be easier to clean chips from, but the round holes on top would let more chips fall in.

lomoverde

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2021, 08:49:18 am »
You can get crocs that are enclosed:

https://www.crocs.eu/p/specialist-ii-clog/204590.html?cgid=men-footwear&cid=100#start=17

Or take a trip to the hospital and see what the docs are rocking.

wp34

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2021, 10:52:56 am »
Props for having a basement workshop.  Color me jealous!   :cheers:

I started using a pair of Nike shoes that are effectively slip-ons.

https://www.nike.com/t/glide-flyease-shoe-1QKrmG/DN4919-800

No laces and I can put them on like slippers (no hands).  The sole is padded with ZoomX foam which is super light and bouncy.  No need for shop floor foam padding.

Mike A

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2021, 10:55:35 am »
You guys do realize it takes 20 whole seconds to tie your shoes right?

I just wear an old pair of sneakers in my shop.

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2021, 12:23:26 pm »
I walk around in adidas sandals all day.  Thick rubber sole.  It's fine for the workshop and they are like $20.

BadMouth

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2021, 01:07:26 pm »
You guys do realize it takes 20 whole seconds to tie your shoes right?

I just wear an old pair of sneakers in my shop.
I'm usually just running down there (repeatedly) to get a tool while working on something upstairs.  The electronics stuff is down there as well. Sometimes it's a matter of taking the thing downstairs to use the vice or hammer for 5 seconds.

I also get a chuckle out of having dedicated workshop slippers, but it does prevent things from being tracked upstairs.


Ordered the enclosed Crocs for $26.  Blue was a lot cheaper than black.

Vigo

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2021, 03:16:00 pm »
Crocs make my feet sweat so I can't stand anything closed by them. Been waiting for step-in shoes to start going down in price. There are a bunch of them, but all hovering around $100. Can't justify that for garage/yardwork shoes. I currently just mash my feet into permanently tied sneakers.


wp34

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2021, 04:20:54 pm »
Crocs make my feet sweat so I can't stand anything closed by them. Been waiting for step-in shoes to start going down in price. There are a bunch of them, but all hovering around $100. Can't justify that for garage/yardwork shoes. I currently just mash my feet into permanently tied sneakers.



The Nike's I linked are technically step-ins but the top is mesh and I've found they are not the best to walk around the yard in.  Your feet slide around a little on hills.  The ones you posted look more like traditional shoes you can step into.

Vigo

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2021, 05:03:46 pm »
I wonder if they perform any different. Hopefully someone does a compare. I agree, I need a full shoe to be tight enough for those hills in the yard. Otherwise, I don't much care.

I admit I didn't click your link above because I just assumed it was those ugly easter candy colored monstrosities that Nike called their step-in shoe. Yours look much, much better.


wp34

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2021, 05:51:30 pm »
I wonder if they perform any different. Hopefully someone does a compare. I agree, I need a full shoe to be tight enough for those hills in the yard. Otherwise, I don't much care.

I admit I didn't click your link above because I just assumed it was those ugly easter candy colored monstrosities that Nike called their step-in shoe. Yours look much, much better.



Yeah I see what you mean.   :cheers:

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2021, 02:54:27 am »
I'm almost entirely a form follows function kinda guy but man are those things ugly.

My footwear of choice for the workshop is actually a pair of slippers as they are known here, otherwise referred to as flip-fops, slaps, thongs, sandals, etc... depending on where you live.

I have a 100 yd walk to my shop but admittedly it is a different climate than most see.

Not osha approved of course, but I am not dealing with a lot of metal shavings regularly either I guess.

And of course local custom is to leave your shoes at the door and be barefoot in anyone's home.

If it was cold, I think second to crocs would be javeryh's suggestion of slip in sandals like the ones all my soccer playing friends wear.

Adidas ones are pretty comfy.
Relax, all right? My old man is a television repairman, he's got this ultimate set of tools! I can fix it.

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2022, 01:04:59 pm »
USMC issue RAT boots.  Closed tongue, so nothing can get in.  For full comfort mode, tie a knot at the ends of the laces, leave them unlaced and pull your pant leg down over them.

If you are wearing slippers, or any soft-toed/open shoe in the shop, you are asking for trouble.  Feet are too important to leave them unprotected.

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2022, 03:37:04 pm »
When dealing with heavy, hot, sharp, etc. things where I am concerned about maiming myself my feet wind up in the steel toed boots that I use for all else when necessary.

Except for ripping full sheets of plywood I can usually get away with slippers while working on arcade machine stuff though.

Just wind up with dirty feet.

If I was still living on the East coast I would be dressed quite differently!
Relax, all right? My old man is a television repairman, he's got this ultimate set of tools! I can fix it.

Zebidee

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2022, 11:29:30 am »
Everything at our place was built by workers wearing flip-flops, even while doing stuff like cutting and welding steel. They might take them off sometimes when climbing over a rooftop or something.

I go a grade higher and wear sandals around in my workshop, but that is mainly because otherwise the hard concrete floor makes my feet filthy and kills my arches.  Oh, and we have centipedes here, freaking large red/black/orange/yellow ones over 30cm long with a powerful neurotoxin that hurts like nothing you can even imagine if they bite you (actually you can - imagine that you just stepped on a land mine and your foot is now bologna but is still on fire for several days, I know what I'm talking about). So, sandals.
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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2022, 01:30:20 pm »
Everything at our place was built by workers wearing flip-flops, even while doing stuff like cutting and welding steel. They might take them off sometimes when climbing over a rooftop or something.

I was working on a project on my CNC and accidentally knocked a 12" square piece of 3/4" MDF onto my Nike-clad foot.  It hit corner down on the bridge of my foot.  Had me limping for several days.

Do what you want, but it doesn't take something massive to do damage.  An unlucky incident is all it takes.  But hey, if you're into taking those kinds of chances, no skin off anyone else's toes  :D

Vigo

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2022, 01:40:28 pm »
I agree with that sentiment. The minute I am running a major power tool I'll try to make a point to put on hard work boots. I find that 80% of the time I'm in the garage, I'm doing something small enough. Epoxying, soldering, sanding, using a drill to fix something up, etc... I'm gonna be too lazy to lace up boots unless there is heavy stuff in motion.

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #16 on: February 02, 2022, 04:40:12 pm »
Everything at our place was built by workers wearing flip-flops, even while doing stuff like cutting and welding steel. They might take them off sometimes when climbing over a rooftop or something.

I was working on a project on my CNC and accidentally knocked a 12" square piece of 3/4" MDF onto my Nike-clad foot.  It hit corner down on the bridge of my foot.  Had me limping for several days.

Do what you want, but it doesn't take something massive to do damage.  An unlucky incident is all it takes.  But hey, if you're into taking those kinds of chances, no skin off anyone else's toes  :D

Sorry to hear about your foot.

You are using the wrong pronoun, as I agree with you. It wasn't ME wearing flip-flops while building houses. The builders wear what they want. Mostly they wouldn't know where to buy proper boots, even if they could afford them. You might say I should insist they wear this or that, and sometimes I even do that, but that won't get them wearing proper footwear.

I imagine that when you invite a professional tradesperson/contractor to do a job at your home, you don't usually tell them what expensive safety equipment to use. They'd probably just politely tell you to mind your own business. Same here.

Like many people already know, I'm talking about Thailand and lax safety regulations/habits, awareness is not great. It is like another world. Even so, in my experience the workers take a great amount of care and serious incidents are thankfully rare. Did I mention that it gets very hot & humid in Thailand, and that the culture requires removal of footwear before entering any "clean" space (like a home, or even just sitting on a mat to eat lunch)?

If it was ME working all day on a building site then I'd be sure to wear some proper boots. Still probably wouldn't bother for most small jobs though because those cultural rules also apply to me. Maybe I need some decent slip-ons? Yeah maybe I do :)
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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #17 on: February 02, 2022, 07:46:24 pm »
When dealing with heavy, hot, sharp, etc. things where I am concerned about maiming myself my feet wind up in the steel toed boots that I use for all else when necessary.

Except for ripping full sheets of plywood I can usually get away with slippers while working on arcade machine stuff though.

Just wind up with dirty feet.

If I was still living on the East coast I would be dressed quite differently!

it's just above freezing in my stone unheated basement.
i am debating on small 110v hanging heaters to put in multiple spots on the ceiling so I can patch and paint the stone walls and insulate the sill plate or just go full on 220v shop heater.

i can spend all night down there working as long as the temp is over 60.

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #18 on: February 02, 2022, 10:09:43 pm »
When dealing with heavy, hot, sharp, etc. things where I am concerned about maiming myself my feet wind up in the steel toed boots that I use for all else when necessary.

Except for ripping full sheets of plywood I can usually get away with slippers while working on arcade machine stuff though.

Just wind up with dirty feet.

If I was still living on the East coast I would be dressed quite differently!

it's just above freezing in my stone unheated basement.
i am debating on small 110v hanging heaters to put in multiple spots on the ceiling so I can patch and paint the stone walls and insulate the sill plate or just go full on 220v shop heater.

i can spend all night down there working as long as the temp is over 60.

Eeeek!
Talk about cold feet-

I had one of those little heaters in my board shop out on Cape Cod.
Even just one in a 300sq ft place made a huge difference.
That WAS above ground though-

I'm such a sissy now that if it gets down to 60F I need to put on jeans and maybe a long sleeve shirt
 :laugh:
Relax, all right? My old man is a television repairman, he's got this ultimate set of tools! I can fix it.

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #19 on: February 02, 2022, 11:36:14 pm »
I used to wear these suede slip on shoes in my workshop years ago. Someone even commented on those comfy shoes in the forum when they showed up in a pic I posted. Bits of metal and other debris didn't cling to them much, hmm I may have to find me another pair of them...

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #20 on: February 03, 2022, 07:45:35 am »
I donít know how you guys can possibly expect to find all the metal shavings or broken glass on the floor unless youíre bare foot.


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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #21 on: February 03, 2022, 08:56:49 am »
I used to wear these suede slip on shoes in my workshop years ago. Someone even commented on those comfy shoes in the forum when they showed up in a pic I posted. Bits of metal and other debris didn't cling to them much, hmm I may have to find me another pair of them...

You can drink my liquor from an old jam jar, but don't stick to my suede slip shoes.
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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2022, 10:06:18 pm »
When dealing with heavy, hot, sharp, etc. things where I am concerned about maiming myself my feet wind up in the steel toed boots that I use for all else when necessary.

Except for ripping full sheets of plywood I can usually get away with slippers while working on arcade machine stuff though.

Just wind up with dirty feet.

If I was still living on the East coast I would be dressed quite differently!

it's just above freezing in my stone unheated basement.
i am debating on small 110v hanging heaters to put in multiple spots on the ceiling so I can patch and paint the stone walls and insulate the sill plate or just go full on 220v shop heater.

i can spend all night down there working as long as the temp is over 60.
Not sure whether it would affect your paint,  but I've been running a smallish kerosene heater.  I had it as an emergency backup heat source, but the basement got too cold to comfortably work with the recent single digit temps.  IIRC, it was rated for 300 square feet, but it heats my 800 sq ft basement well enough that after a few hours it's too warm to wear a sweatshirt.  I also tried a 1500 watt "milk house heater" which works well in small rooms, but didn't accomplish much in the basement.

On the workshop slippers...
The enclosed crocs have worked well for slipping on for quick tasks.  If I end up getting into a project and staying down there all day, my feet do sweat from them even while wearing socks.  I do put on boots when I plan to be down there for a while, but sometimes a quick task turna into hours.

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #23 on: February 06, 2022, 10:12:42 pm »
Not sure whether it would affect your paint,  but I've been running a smallish kerosene heater.

Can't paint when it is too cold, it won't dry properly, so you need some environmental heat for that as much as for comfort while painting.
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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #24 on: February 07, 2022, 10:08:45 am »
Yeah, I'd go with something with real flame, but vent-free indoor grade. Everything I've had electrical heat has felt slow and wasteful.


https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200664868_200664868


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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2022, 01:08:33 pm »
Yeah, I'd go with something with real flame, but vent-free indoor grade. Everything I've had electrical heat has felt slow and wasteful.

Careful with vent free gas heaters in a workshop.  They put out a lot of moisture, which can already be an issue in a basement location.  Leads to mold, rusty tools, etc.  Also don't want to be using an open flame anywhere solvent vapors or fine sawdust are created and could ignite.

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #26 on: February 08, 2022, 01:12:34 pm »
The very idea of that thing seems ---smurfing--- crazy to me.  That carbon monoxide isn't magically disappearing.  But basements freak me out anyway, so you cave people do your cave people things.

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #27 on: February 08, 2022, 02:12:45 pm »
Yeah, I'd go with something with real flame, but vent-free indoor grade. Everything I've had electrical heat has felt slow and wasteful.

Careful with vent free gas heaters in a workshop.  They put out a lot of moisture, which can already be an issue in a basement location.  Leads to mold, rusty tools, etc.  Also don't want to be using an open flame anywhere solvent vapors or fine sawdust are created and could ignite.


Well, YMMV, but there is a real difference between using vent-free as a primary constant heat source and using it as a supplemental heat boost. I generally turn on heat for 15 minutes before working in the winter, it toasts up the room very well, then about every hour I give another 5-10 minutes of heat to keep things at 70. Winters in MN are way too dry to begin with. Never needed in any amount to create a moisture issue, and not running much when i am working.

Also, electrical isn't necessarily much safer. Nichrome wire at 1500 degrees is going to be a light up flammable vapor quickly. Probably electric radiant oil heating is better if the element is sealed, but it is a slow heat source. (Could be a good option for drying paint over many hours.)


The very idea of that thing seems ---smurfing--- crazy to me.  That carbon monoxide isn't magically disappearing.  But basements freak me out anyway, so you cave people do your cave people things.


My understanding is that carbon monoxide generally isn't created at a significant level because it is a full combustion instead of a partial combustion that most flame heat creates. Couldn't tell you specifics of the real difference. They come equipped with safety sensors to begin with, and at least in my case, I'm not using in any rooms that have particularly great air sealing, so I am not too concerned.

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #28 on: February 08, 2022, 06:52:24 pm »
Carbon monoxide is very dangerous, and insidious as you cannot see or smell it.

Here is a true story from a few years ago in Australia. It happened near a rural village I used to live in, though I did not live there at the time of this story.

Bloke on a farm wants to clean out a water tank. So he gets his petrol water pump, pressure cleaner, to help. Goes inside to work. Gets a bit tired and sits down to rest.

His wife finds him late for lunch, he seems to be asleep, so she goes into the tank to to get him.

Then his brother (visiting from out of town) goes looking for him and the wife at the tank, finds both people in there in a bad way, goes into the tank to help out.

Finally a neighbour who heard screams goes to the tank to work out what is going on. Sees all three in there looking bad. Being cleverer than most, they go to get help.

All three died. A huge chunk of a family, of a community, wiped out in one go.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-17/poisonous-gas-detected-in-water-tank-where-three-bodies-found/8279576
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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #29 on: February 08, 2022, 10:43:21 pm »
When dealing with heavy, hot, sharp, etc. things where I am concerned about maiming myself my feet wind up in the steel toed boots that I use for all else when necessary.

Except for ripping full sheets of plywood I can usually get away with slippers while working on arcade machine stuff though.

Just wind up with dirty feet.

If I was still living on the East coast I would be dressed quite differently!

it's just above freezing in my stone unheated basement.
i am debating on small 110v hanging heaters to put in multiple spots on the ceiling so I can patch and paint the stone walls and insulate the sill plate or just go full on 220v shop heater.

i can spend all night down there working as long as the temp is over 60.
Not sure whether it would affect your paint,  but I've been running a smallish kerosene heater.  I had it as an emergency backup heat source, but the basement got too cold to comfortably work with the recent single digit temps.  IIRC, it was rated for 300 square feet, but it heats my 800 sq ft basement well enough that after a few hours it's too warm to wear a sweatshirt.  I also tried a 1500 watt "milk house heater" which works well in small rooms, but didn't accomplish much in the basement.

On the workshop slippers...
The enclosed crocs have worked well for slipping on for quick tasks.  If I end up getting into a project and staying down there all day, my feet do sweat from them even while wearing socks.  I do put on boots when I plan to be down there for a while, but sometimes a quick task turna into hours.

single digit made basement no man's land.
i've used kerosene torpedo heaters 20yrs ago but it stinks the house up a bit.
I saw they have propane torpedo's now.

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #30 on: February 08, 2022, 10:47:43 pm »
Yeah, I'd go with something with real flame, but vent-free indoor grade. Everything I've had electrical heat has felt slow and wasteful.


https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200664868_200664868

these are significantly more than 220v electric heaters but research is telling me they heat better.
I'm not worried about humidity.
I keep two dehumidifies with hose bypasses on both ends of my stone basement because of moisture.
now paper doesn't even mildew.

if I can find a used pellet stove cheap enough i may put one down there also.

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #31 on: February 09, 2022, 01:20:35 am »
As Zebidee points out, burning things in enclosed spaces (especially below ground level) is a bad idea.

Residue from burning ---steaming pile of meadow muffin--- wreaks havoc with finishes anyway.

The electric thing probably won't kill you or pollute your work- and they work!

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Stiebel-Eltron-CK-150-1-Trend-Wall-Mounted-Electric-Fan-Heater-CK-150-1-Trend/301366972?g_store=&source=shoppingads&locale=en-US&&mtc=Shopping-BF-F_D26P-G-D26P-026_002_AIR_CIRC_ACC-NA-NA-Feed-SMART-NA-NA-New_Engen&cm_mmc=Shopping-BF-F_D26P-G-D26P-026_002_AIR_CIRC_ACC-NA-NA-Feed-SMART-NA-NA-New_Engen-71700000072275519-58700006336256927-92700057184004007&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIp7ehzvzx9QIVARLnCh2qIAzLEAQYAyABEgJhKPD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

Holy ---steaming pile of meadow muffin--- is that a long link.
Relax, all right? My old man is a television repairman, he's got this ultimate set of tools! I can fix it.

BadMouth

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #32 on: February 09, 2022, 08:18:11 pm »


  But basements freak me out anyway, so you cave people do your cave people things.

Mine's not so much a cave.  I can see the backyard through the door and two small windows.  It's only five steps below grade in the back.  At my previous house, you could walk out at ground level.

I watch a lot of HGTV.  Always bugs me that houses in Texas are built on slabs.  All my plumbing, electrical, & HVAC are easily accessed and serviceable because they are in an unfinished basement.  Don't need to crawl in the attic, crawlspace, bust concrete or tear open walls to fix anything. 

I bought a carbon monoxide detector with a level readout for the basement when I started using the kerosene heater.  It has never read anything but zero, even when placed near the heater.  I am paranoid that it doesn't work.  I keep meaning to take it outside and put it next to the tailpipe.  There is another carbon monoxide detector upstairs.




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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #33 on: February 09, 2022, 10:24:11 pm »
Slabs are slow, loud, and banging.

 :cheers:

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #34 on: February 12, 2022, 10:58:32 am »
As Zebidee points out, burning things in enclosed spaces (especially below ground level) is a bad idea.

Residue from burning ---steaming pile of meadow muffin--- wreaks havoc with finishes anyway.

The electric thing probably won't kill you or pollute your work- and they work!

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Stiebel-Eltron-CK-150-1-Trend-Wall-Mounted-Electric-Fan-Heater-CK-150-1-Trend/301366972?g_store=&source=shoppingads&locale=en-US&&mtc=Shopping-BF-F_D26P-G-D26P-026_002_AIR_CIRC_ACC-NA-NA-Feed-SMART-NA-NA-New_Engen&cm_mmc=Shopping-BF-F_D26P-G-D26P-026_002_AIR_CIRC_ACC-NA-NA-Feed-SMART-NA-NA-New_Engen-71700000072275519-58700006336256927-92700057184004007&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIp7ehzvzx9QIVARLnCh2qIAzLEAQYAyABEgJhKPD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

Holy ---steaming pile of meadow muffin--- is that a long link.

the one i'm looking at is 220v, a few dollars more, 5k watts and puts out 17k BTU.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08HVWQ3ZQ/ref=ox_sc_saved_image_2?smid=A2DB5OMOSIF4AG&th=1

i'll also need to buy an external thermostat and breaker for the panel so looking at closer to $175.
but...i have uninsulated steel basement doors leading out.
so, i need to put the insulated exterior door a friend gave me in the opening so i'm not just funneling hot air outside.
but i need to move my brewing equipment first so i have room to do it.

it's a process.  :laugh:

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #35 on: February 12, 2022, 12:19:49 pm »
Sounds like a process. Good luck for sure!

Are you installing really close to the breaker? 50 feet of 8/2 romex is over $100 these days.  :(

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Re: Workshop slippers?
« Reply #36 on: February 13, 2022, 12:17:23 am »
Sounds like a process. Good luck for sure!

Are you installing really close to the breaker? 50 feet of 8/2 romex is over $100 these days.  :(

oh yeah.
bought 25ft of 6/4 in october for a hot tub and that was $120.
same thing is $160 now.

if i put it in the far corner away from the stairs up it'll be about 20ft of wire.
best place i think.
If I put it next to the box where the stairs are i imagine the heat will just shoot up the stairs.
so 25' of metal clad 8/2 with ground is $63 on amazon.
i'll check ebay, home depot and my electrician friend who sometimes has "scrap" from job sites.
plus i'll need him to show me how to add the breaker and wire the panel without killing myself.
I think i know how but i've never done it.