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So ... 3d Printers....

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lilshawn:
i build wiff squars and sirkuls an stuff in tinkercad.

real cad is 2 hard

RandyT:

--- Quote from: Ond on April 24, 2024, 06:26:58 pm ---
Thanks, that web print is as per the mesh that I designed:

--- End quote ---

I considered that they might be fully modeled, but my brain recoiled at the possibility. It does look nicely organic!


--- Quote from: lilshawn on April 25, 2024, 11:51:50 am ---i build wiff squars and sirkuls an stuff in tinkercad.

real cad is 2 hard

--- End quote ---

I was fortunate enough to be exposed to parametric modeling at my last 9 to 5 (over 20 years ago...oof) and it was a slog.  When it was being explained to me and while watching someone use it, I could literally feel my synapses re-routing and it was painful.  But one day, as if by some sort of biological sorcery, it just "clicked" and it was downhill from there.  Those learning curves can sometimes feel like a straight vertical line, but they are surmountable.  The tools have also become quite a bit better since then.

That stated, you might want to take a look at Plasticity.  It's CAD, but meant for those who might feel more at home using something like Blender or those who like modifying primitives (squars and sirkuls an stuff..lol.)  There's still a learning curve that my brain rejects due to the parametric modeling programming I received, but it looks very capable in the hands of someone more accustomed to more artistic ways of designing things.

But on the free side for local installs, there are basically only a couple of decent options: FreeCAD (and it's forks) and Blender.  FreeCAD has it's own ways of doing things, which parametric modelers who are already trained seem to despise, but if you are going in cold, there's no reason not to learn it.  Blender, as you probably know, is an insanely capable beast and there is a plugin in the works for doing CAD functions within it.  With all that capability, the learning curve is particularly steep. It's a 3D modeling application, so there is a ton of stuff not particularly aimed at functional design work.  So unless your interest is in the artistic over the functional or you already have experience in that realm, I wouldn't recommend that direction to someone who just wants to design their own parts.

Ond:

--- Quote from: RandyT on April 25, 2024, 12:45:00 pm ---I considered that they might be fully modeled, but my brain recoiled at the possibility. It does look nicely organic!


--- End quote ---

I was tempted to make them even more bumpy and irregular but settled for the result you see. 3D printers are such a natural progression from 3D design. I guess it's taken me this long to acquire one because I wasn't that impressed with them in the early days. I have a few build tasks coming up which will need printed parts. I'll post the results here as well.  I'm also doing a larger articulated mech spider with more detail, just for fun! Happy to share the STL when its ready.  :cheers: 

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