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Raspberry Pi = New Gen of Small Cabs?

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kahlid74:

--- Quote from: 404 on March 02, 2012, 09:26:41 am ---
--- Quote from: kahlid74 on March 02, 2012, 09:13:27 am ---
--- Quote from: 404 on March 01, 2012, 03:12:24 pm ---
--- Quote from: kahlid74 on March 01, 2012, 09:47:17 am ---I'll be getting one to test and play with but I think from an emulation standpoint the fanless systems currently out now (Mini-ITX) will still be superior.

My problem with the Raspberry Pi is how much it can truly handle.  I'd like to play with it as a SAN/NAS and push it's data backbone.

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It's way too early to tell. We still need a mature linux distro and dependencies such as SDL fully working and ported in order to even begin working on emulation. the XBMC guys already have a working prototype of XBMC running on the pi. That in itself should alleviate having to port quite a few basic libraries to the device.

buying a device just for XBMC is well worth the mere $35 price tag considering many media players with less features are going for anywhere between $75-$200+ dollars.

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How well does XBMC work?  I've seen ATOMs rock at XBMC and other Atoms fail wonderfully.  My experience with Media Center PC's is that even if the specs are the same, no two computers run video the same.

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Very impressive!  makes me want to make a NAS with it big time now.

ark_ader:
Raspberry pi is as powerful as my Xbox 1.  They are currently $15 and XBMC runs very well.

My 5v Pi though will be integrated into a self sustaining environment, that could eventually replace my power hungry desktop.

That is the attraction, and if the model A comes to fruition we will see more Linux capable people in the job market.   :applaud:

What I would like to know if the Model A will be able to run Froyo, which is miles better than Linux for an OS, and could be compatible with Windows 8 in the future.

I cannot see kids learning Python, but I could see them programming in a cheap c#/XNA capable box/environment.

At the end of the day, it is for the children to own and learn.

Which is the best thing that could ever come out this industry in the last 10 years. ;D

Vigo:
I don't know if I quite buy the "It's for the children" thing. That sounds more like an excuse to get grant money for the project. Sure, it might be another step in the right direction for making computers available to anyone, but why is this not available only and exclusively to educational organizations and schools? I am pretty sure that this will mostly be falling into the hands of techy adults.

I personally am much more excited about OLED. That stuff looks amazing.

404:

--- Quote from: kahlid74 on March 02, 2012, 11:53:45 am ---Very impressive!  makes me want to make a NAS with it big time now.

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Considering the huge bottleneck in terms of having to use usb to to ide or sata, that kind of project would be no different than buying a standard pogoplug or seagate goflex. I have the seagate goflex net which basically is a tiny 1.2ghz arm device with two sata ports. Got it running arch linux, works nice. Time for me however, to move on to a better, stronger nas.


--- Quote from: Vigo on March 02, 2012, 05:12:03 pm ---I don't know if I quite buy the "It's for the children" thing. That sounds more like an excuse to get grant money for the project. Sure, it might be another step in the right direction for making computers available to anyone, but why is this not available only and exclusively to educational organizations and schools? I am pretty sure that this will mostly be falling into the hands of techy adults.

I personally am much more excited about OLED. That stuff looks amazing.

--- End quote ---

You have to understand the reasoning behind the raspberry pi. The inventors are from the UK which brings us to the backstory here. During the late 70's-80's, the BBC began sponsoring a computer literacy program in the UK. The cornerstone of this project was a number of computers such as the BBC Micro. As time went on, cheaper acorn compatible units were released and home computing in the UK flourished. The idea behind the Raspberry Pi is the essentially the same.

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